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Diabetes Expected Prevalence

U.s. Leads Developed Nations In Diabetes Prevalence

U.s. Leads Developed Nations In Diabetes Prevalence

New and detailed data from the new International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, released at this week’s World Diabetes Congress in Vancouver, Canada (Nov 30-Dec 4) reveals that, unsurprisingly, the United States has the highest prevalence (11% of the population aged 20-79 years) of diabetes among developed nations. This league table includes countries of the European Union plus Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Israel, Andorra, Norway, Switzerland, and the U.S. itself. And in terms of estimates of absolute numbers of people with diabetes in these nations, the U.S., with almost 30 million people with diabetes, has around two thirds the number of cases of all the other 37 nations in the developed nation league combined (46 million). In terms of prevalence, Singapore finished a close second to the U.S. (10.5%), followed by Malta (10%), Portugal (10%), and Cyprus (9.5%) in 3rd, 4th, and 5th place respectively. The countries with the lowest estimated prevalence in the 38 nation league were (lowest first), Lithuania, Estonia, and Ireland (all around 4%), followed by Sweden, Luxembourg, the U.K., and Australia (all around 5%). Canada, the host nation for the World Diabetes Congress, has the 12th highest prevalence, at 7%. “The prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide,” says Professor Nam Cho, chair of the IDF Diabetes Atlas committee. “While the exact cause of type 1 diabetes is currently unknown, trends such as urbanisation, unhealthy diets and reduced physical activity are all contributing lifestyle factors that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.” The individual country data follows the release of the Diabetes Atlas summary, revealing that an estimated 415 million people globally have diabetes in 2015, wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence Estimates For Local Populations

Diabetes Prevalence Estimates For Local Populations

Healthcare professionals can use the estimates to understand: the estimated total number of people in their area with diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) the estimated proportion of people in their area that have been diagnosed with diabetes This can help with planning services that address rising levels of diabetes and tracking progress towards closing the gap between diagnoses and the total number of cases. The estimates take into account the age, sex, and ethnic group distribution, and deprivation of the area. The diabetes prevalence model does not make a distinction between the types of diabetes. The estimates use data from the Health Survey for England (2012, 2013 and 2014), which looks at the changes in health and lifestyles across the country. Population data are from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and GP registered populations. The documents that accompany the estimates include: estimates by CCG tool for the impact of obesity on diabetes summary analysis of estimates of diabetes prevalence across England technical document explaining how the estimates are created Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes Is Expected To Be On The Rise

Prevalence Of Diabetes Is Expected To Be On The Rise

Prevalence of diabetes is expected to be on the rise Daniella Potter, Se-Anne Rall and CNS reporter The annual cost of diabetes -- including health care needs -- exceeds $827 billion (728 billion euros), according to the World Health Organisation World Diabetes Day was started in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threats posed by diabetes. As November 14 marks World Diabetes Day, the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology (CDE) says nearly five million people in South Africa are possibly living with diabetes. This is because an estimated 7% to 9% of the countrys population between the ages of 20 and 79 have diabetes. A statement issued by the centre read: Given the fact that proportionately Africa has the highest number of people with undiagnosed diabetes (over two-thirds of people unaware that they have the condition), many more South Africans may actually have diabetes. The CDE describes diabetes as a chronic health condition that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, which lowers blood glucose. It may also occur whenthe body cannot use the insulin it produces. ALSO READ:Education and vaccination are vital to eliminating Rabies Types 1 and 2 are the two common types of diabetes. According to theInternational Diabetes Federation, it is predicted that the global prevalence of diabetes is expected to rise exponentially over the next 25 years so that by the year 2040, it is believed that one in every 10 adults will have diabetes. Therefore, CDE is using World Diabetes Day to educate South Africans of the need for screening to ensure early diagnosis and treatment of Type 2 diabetes in a bid to prevent serious diabetes-related complications. The CDE explained that the IDF and World Health Organisation started World Diabetes Dayin Continue reading >>

Improving Health Through Leadership And Innovation

Improving Health Through Leadership And Innovation

Diabetes What’s the Story? Diabetes is the eighth leading cause of death in New Jersey. It is the fifth leading cause among Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians; sixth among males; and eighth among Whites and females. In New Jersey, nearly 2,000 deaths each year are due to diabetes. The age-adjusted death rate due to diabetes is about 18 per 100,000 standard population. The age-adjusted death rate among males is more than double the rate among females. The rate among Blacks is much higher than that of other racial/ethnic groups but the gap is narrowing. The DOH Diabetes Prevention and Control Program seeks to reduce the health impacts of diabetes by increasing awareness of diabetes and its complications, improving the quality of diabetes care and access to care, developing partnerships and increasing community involvement to address diabetes issues, and utilizing data to better apply resources and improve health outcomes. Did you know? The rate of new adult diabetes cases is increasing in the state. In 2016, the diabetes prevalence was 9.2%. Approximately 640,000 adults have diabetes statewide. Continue reading >>

Incidence, Prevalence And Genetic Determinants Of Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Protocol

Incidence, Prevalence And Genetic Determinants Of Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Protocol

Incidence, prevalence and genetic determinants of neonatal diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol In the absence of existing data, the present review intends to determine the incidence, prevalence and/or genetic determinants of neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM), with expected contribution to disease characterization. We will include cross-sectional, cohort or case-control studies which have reported the incidence, prevalence and/or genetic determinants of NDM between January 01, 2000 and May 31, 2016, published in English or French languages and without any geographical limitation. PubMed and EMBASE will be extensively screened to identify potentially eligible studies, completed by manual search. Two authors will independently screen, select studies, extract data, and assess the risk of bias; disagreements will be resolved by consensus. Clinical heterogeneity will be investigated by examining the design and setting (including geographic region), procedure used for genetic testing, calculation of incidence or prevalence, and outcomes in each study. Studies found to be clinically homogeneous will be pooled together through a random effects meta-analysis. Statistical heterogeneity will be assessed using the chi-square test of homogeneity and quantified using the I2 statistic. In case of substantial heterogeneity, subgroup analyses will be undertaken. Publication bias will be assessed with funnel plots, complemented with the use of Eggers test of bias. This systematic review and meta-analysis is expected to draw a clear picture of phenotypic and genotypic presentations of NDM in order to better understand the condition and adequately address challenges in respect with its management. EpidemiologyGenetic: neonatal diabetes mellitusSystematic review Continue reading >>

Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Estimates for the year 2000 and projections for 2030 Abstract OBJECTIVE—The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and the number of people of all ages with diabetes for years 2000 and 2030. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Data on diabetes prevalence by age and sex from a limited number of countries were extrapolated to all 191 World Health Organization member states and applied to United Nations’ population estimates for 2000 and 2030. Urban and rural populations were considered separately for developing countries. RESULTS—The prevalence of diabetes for all age-groups worldwide was estimated to be 2.8% in 2000 and 4.4% in 2030. The total number of people with diabetes is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. The prevalence of diabetes is higher in men than women, but there are more women with diabetes than men. The urban population in developing countries is projected to double between 2000 and 2030. The most important demographic change to diabetes prevalence across the world appears to be the increase in the proportion of people >65 years of age. CONCLUSIONS—These findings indicate that the “diabetes epidemic” will continue even if levels of obesity remain constant. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, it is likely that these figures provide an underestimate of future diabetes prevalence. The number of people with diabetes is increasing due to population growth, aging, urbanization, and increasing prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity. Quantifying the prevalence of diabetes and the number of people affected by diabetes, now and in the future, is important to allow rational planning and allocation of resources. Estimates of current and future diabetes prevalence have been published previously Continue reading >>

The Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

The Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Common health risks, associated symptoms, and impact on healthcare costs Diabetes, a disease affecting blood glucose control, is a growing issue worldwide. From 1980 to 2014, the number of people affected by diabetes almost quadrupled from 108 million to 422 million worldwide, or a growth in diabetes prevalence of 4.7% to 8.5%.1 This growth trend is not estimated to stop or slow in the future, according to the IDF Diabetes Atlas, by 2040 the number of worldwide diabetics are expected to grow to 642 million, representing a potential future healthcare crisis for patients and providers alike.2 The healthcare costs are also expected to balloon. In the years between 2007 and 2012, the total healthcare costs associated with diabetes rose from $174 billion to $245 billion, or 41% in just a 5-year period.3 The majority of diabetes cases occur in developing countries, representing a high proportion of the disease’s economic burden. Prevalence of diabetes in Asian countries is particularly high and expected to increase.4 In fact, 60% of the world’s diabetic population are concentrated in Asian countries, with socio-economic growth, industrialization, and urbanization being three of the most common factors associated with increased prevalence of the disease.4 Diabetes is also growing in potentially epidemic proportions in India where over 62 million people are affected.5,6 Genetic factors, improved living standards, and rising levels of obesity are some of the many reasons associated diabetes is growing in this geographic region.7 Diabetes: health effects The short- and long-term health effects associated with diabetes are many, and each of these health effects worsen with poor glycemic control. Managing diabetes appropriately with prescribed therapies, diet, and lifestyle cha Continue reading >>

Idf Diabetes Atlas: Global Estimates For The Prevalence Of Diabetes For 2015 And 2040

Idf Diabetes Atlas: Global Estimates For The Prevalence Of Diabetes For 2015 And 2040

Jump to Section 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus describes a group of metabolic disorders characterised by increased blood glucose concentration. People living with diabetes have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality than the general population. The global prevalence of diabetes in adults has been increasing over recent decades. In 1964, it was estimated that 30 million people had diabetes [15]. Less than 40 years later, the WHO estimated that there were 171 million people living with diabetes [51]. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global prevalence to be 151 million in 2000 [28], 194 million in 2003 [27], 246 million in 2006 [26], 285 million in 2009 [25], 366 million in 2011 [24], and 382 million in 2013 [23]. Each estimate was based on the latest data available. The IDF Atlas methodology was substantially updated in 2011 [19] to incorporate an analytic hierarchy process that formalised the methods to prioritise the highest quality data from available sources. The dramatic increase in diabetes has occurred in all countries, and in rural as well as urban areas. Accurate global, regional, and country-level estimates and projections of diabetes prevalence are necessary for prevention and treatment strategies to be planned and monitored, and to assess progress towards reaching the targets set by the Global Action Plan for Non-Communicable Diseases and the Sustainable Development Goals [55]. This paper provides estimates of the worldwide and regional impact of diabetes for 2015 and 2040, based on the most recent and highest quality epidemiological data. For the first time, the IDF Diabetes Atlas methodology also includes uncertainty intervals to reflect confidence levels around the prevalence estimates. These uncertainty measurements permit the Continue reading >>

Incidence And Prevalence Rates Of Diabetes Mellitus In Saudi Arabia: An Overview

Incidence And Prevalence Rates Of Diabetes Mellitus In Saudi Arabia: An Overview

Highlights • • • Diabetes is higher among females, older children/adolescent. • Diabetes is higher in urban areas than rural areas. • Further studies of the incidence and prevalence rates diabetes are needed. Abstract This study aimed to report on the trends in incidence and prevalence rates of diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia over the last 25 years (1990–2015). A systematic search was conducted for English-language, peer reviewed publications of any research design via Medline, EBSCO, PubMed and Scopus from 1990 to 2015. Of 106 articles retrieved, after removal of duplicates and quality appraisal, 8 studies were included in the review and synthesised based on study characteristics, design and findings. Studies originated from Saudi Arabia and applied a variety of research designs and tools to diagnosis diabetes. Of the 8 included studies; three reported type 1 diabetes and five on type 2 diabetes. Overall, findings indicated that the incidence and prevalence rate of diabetes is rising particularly among females, older children/adolescent and in urban areas. Further development are required to assess the health intervention, polices, guidelines, self-management programs in Saudi Arabia. Fig. 1. Flowchart of study selection. Fig. 2. Incidence rate of T1DM between 1990 and 2009 in Saudi Arabia. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common form of diabetes and is currently a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality. This is likely to worsen, given the rapidly increasing prevalence of this condition; therefore, an understanding of its etiology and pathogenesis is of considerable importance. By definition, patients with type 2 diabetes have neither autoimmune β cell destruction, as is found in type 1 diabetes, nor one of the other specific causes of diab Continue reading >>

The Prevalence Of Diabetic Retinopathy Among Adults In The United States

The Prevalence Of Diabetic Retinopathy Among Adults In The United States

A, Standard photograph 1. Retinopathyequal to this level in 4 quadrants would constitute level 43 (or 40) diabeticretinopathy, the lower threshold for moderate diabetic retinopathy. Retinopathyless than this photograph in any field would constitute mild retinopathy.B, Standard photograph 2. Retinopathy equal to this level in 1 quadrant withlesser retinopathy in the remaining quadrants would constitute level 43 (or40) moderate retinopathy. Retinopathy equal to this level in all 4 quadrants,venous beading in 2 quadrants, or intraretinal microvascular abnormalitiesin 1 quadrant would constitute level 53 (or 50) diabetic retinopathy, thelowest level of severe retinopathy. C, Severe diabetic retinopathy illustratingextensive blot hemorrhages, venous beading, and intraretinal microvascularabnormalities. Courtesy of the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy StudyResearch Group. A, Prevalence of diabetic retinopathyamong white subjects who have diabetes mellitus. B, Prevalence of diabeticretinopathy among Hispanic and black subjects who have diabetes mellitus.BDES indicates Beaver Dam Eye Study, Beaver Dam, Wis; SAHS, San Antonio HeartStudy, San Antonio, Tex; SLVDS, San Luis Valley Diabetes Study, San Luis Valley,Colo; VER, Vision Evaluation Research, Nogales and Tucson, Ariz; and WESDR,Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy, southern Wisconsin.The Barbados Eye Study was conducted in Barbados, West Indies; all participantswere black. A, Prevalence of vision-threateningdiabetic retinopathy among white subjects who have diabetes mellitus. B, Prevalenceof vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy among Hispanic and black subjectswho have diabetes mellitus. BDES indicates Beaver Dam Eye Study, Beaver Dam,Wis; BMES, Blue Mountains Eye Study, Sydney, New South Wales, Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Prevalence Figures For England

New Diabetes Prevalence Figures For England

New data from Public Health England (PHE) reveals 3.8 million people in England aged over 16 had diabetes in 2015, around 9% of the adult population. The new Diabetes Prevalence Model, produced by PHE’s National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN) and launched today at the PHE Conference at Warwick University, estimates the total number of adults with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in England. Whilst 3.8 million people are estimated to have both types of diabetes, approximately 90% of diabetes cases are Type 2, which is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes, which also provide additional benefits for health and wellbeing. The likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes is increased by being overweight (although family history, ethnicity and age can also increase risk). 1 in 4 people with diabetes are undiagnosed The model suggests that one in four people with diabetes, nearly 1 million, are unaware of their condition. Diabetes can lead to serious complications including foot amputation and kidney disease, and is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Tackling diabetes is vital to the future of the health service Based on current population trends, by 2035 4.9 million people will have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes currently costs the NHS £8.8 billion each year and tackling the rise in the disease is vital to the sustainable future of the health service. 'We want people to find out their risk' Chris Askew, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said: “These new estimates clearly show the scale of diabetes and the huge impact on people living with the condition. Too often people only find out they have Type 2 diabetes after they have developed serious complications, such as heart or kidney disease, or foot problems which can lead to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence In Sweden At Present And Projections For Year 2050

Diabetes Prevalence In Sweden At Present And Projections For Year 2050

Abstract Data on the future diabetes burden in Scandinavia is limited. Our aim was to project the future burden of diabetes in Sweden by modelling data on incidence, prevalence, mortality, and demographic factors. To project the future burden of diabetes we used information on the prevalence of diabetes from the national drug prescription registry (adults ≥20 years), previously published data on relative mortality in people with diabetes, and population demographics and projections from Statistics Sweden. Alternative scenarios were created based on different assumptions regarding the future incidence of diabetes. Between 2007 and 2013 the prevalence of diabetes rose from 5.8 to 6.8% in Sweden but incidence remained constant at 4.4 per 1000 (2013). With constant incidence and continued improvement in relative survival, prevalence will increase to 10.4% by year 2050 and the number of afflicted individuals will increase to 940 000. Of this rise, 30% is accounted for by changes in the age structure of the population and 14% by improved relative survival in people with diabetes. A hypothesized 1% annual rise in incidence will result in a prevalence of 12.6% and 1 136 000 cases. Even with decreasing incidence at 1% per year, prevalence of diabetes will continue to increase. We can expect diabetes prevalence to rise substantially in Sweden over the next 35 years as a result of demographic changes and improved survival among people with diabetes. A dramatic reduction in incidence is required to prevent this development. Figures Citation: Andersson T, Ahlbom A, Carlsson S (2015) Diabetes Prevalence in Sweden at Present and Projections for Year 2050. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0143084. Editor: Andrea Icks, Heinrich-Heine University, Faculty of Medicine, GERMANY Received: March 11, 2015; Continue reading >>

Number Of Americans With Diabetes Projected To Double Or Triple By 2050

Number Of Americans With Diabetes Projected To Double Or Triple By 2050

This page is a historical archive and is no longer maintained. For current information, please visit Older, more diverse population and longer lifespans contribute to increase As many as 1 in 3 U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue, according to a new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in 10 U.S. adults has diabetes now. The prevalence is expected to rise sharply over the next 40 years due to an aging population more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, increases in minority groups that are at high risk for type 2 diabetes, and people with diabetes living longer, according to CDC projections published in the journal Population Health Metrics. Because the study factored in aging, minority populations and lifespan, the projections are higher than previous estimates. The report predicts that the number of new diabetes cases each year will increase from 8 per 1,000 people in 2008, to 15 per 1,000 in 2050. The report estimates that the number of Americans with diabetes will range from 1 in 3 to 1 in 5 by 2050. That range reflects differing assumptions about how many people will develop diabetes, and how long they will live after developing the disease. "These are alarming numbers that show how critical it is to change the course of type 2 diabetes," said Ann Albright, PhD, RD, director of CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation. "Successful programs to improve lifestyle choices on healthy eating and physical activity must be made more widely available, because the stakes are too high and the personal toll too devastating to fail." Proper diet and physical activity can reduce the risk of diabetes and help to control the condition in people with diabetes. Effective prevention programs directed at groups at high risk of t Continue reading >>

Diabetes 2030: Insights From Yesterday, Today, And Future Trends

Diabetes 2030: Insights From Yesterday, Today, And Future Trends

Diabetes and its complications, deaths, and societal costs have a huge and rapidly growing impact on the United States. Between 1990 and 2010 the number of people living with diabetes tripled and the number of new cases annually (incidence) doubled.1 Adults with diabetes have a 50% higher risk of death from any cause than adults without diabetes, in addition to risk for myriad complications.2 Reducing this burden will require efforts on many fronts—from appropriate medical care to significant public health efforts and individual behavior change across the nation, through state- and community-specific efforts. Public awareness is a key first step. For this purpose, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) releases national diabetes statistics every 2 years, providing a point-in-time picture of diabetes for the country as a whole. However, state and metropolitan diabetes forecasts with projections several years into the future also are useful as health professionals and decision makers contemplate actions to address the diabetes epidemic. Therefore, the Institute for Alternative Futures (IAF) has prepared 2015, 2020, 2025, and 2030 diabetes forecasts for the entire United States, every state, and several metropolitan statistical areas, all of which are easily accessible on the Internet.3 This study shows how past trends, current data, and future projections provide valuable insights about the possible course of diabetes. Continue reading >>

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