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Diabetes Exercise Plan

Exercise And Diabetes: How To Improve Your Quality Of Life

Exercise And Diabetes: How To Improve Your Quality Of Life

If you suffer from diabetes, it can be difficult to find an exercise plan that will work well for you. Exercise and diabetes may seem impossible if you suffer from the condition, but there are actually a numerous amount of health benefits that come with an effective exercise plan. Below is some expert advice from our founding physician about the benefits of exercise for diabetics, and how being physically active can improve, and maintain, your blood sugar levels. If you are a diabetic, and are looking to get more physically fit, there is an added health benefit that can come with your sweat and tears. “According to recent medical studies, improving your own blood sugar levels could be as simple as adding a basic, daily exercise routine,” says Caroline J. Cederquist, M.D. “The results of this particular study were printed in the Annals of Internal Medicine, and suggest for type 2 diabetes patients, exercise should be as regularly prescribed as any other drug,” says Dr. Cederquist. How Exactly Does Exercise Help Manage Diabetes? The results of this exercise and diabetes study were based on a study group that consisted of 251 adults with type 2 diabetes. Their ages ranged from 39 to 70, and their body mass index, or BMI, was 35. These subjects were not administered insulin, and none of them had a daily exercise routine. The basis of this study was to find out what happens when people with diabetes added aerobics and/or weight lifting to their lifestyles. Before beginning the study, each participant was given a physical check up to make sure that they were able to proceed. Once cleared for the study, they were coached in an exercise routine for one month to ensure that they would be able to proceed with the prescribed exercise and diabetes program. Following the fir Continue reading >>

Start Working Out With T1d

Start Working Out With T1d

WRITTEN BY: Christel Oerum Editor’s Note: Christel is a blogger, personal trainer, diabetes advocate, fitness bikini champion and fitness personality. She has been living with Type 1 diabetes since 1997. Most of us like the idea of exercising and being active. We know that it’s good for us and that we probably should turn it up a notch, but there is so much information out there on what to do, when to do it, fancy new diets, etc., that it’s hard to know what to believe. When you then throw in Type 1 diabetes, it may feel like information overload and I unfortunately do see people just give up sometimes. It’s simply too much and there’s too little guidance on what to do and how to successfully exercise with diabetes. In this post, I’ll try to give you the tools you need to get started on a safe and effective workout routine. Set realistic goals Goal setting is one of the most overlooked, but in my opinion most important, factors in successfully starting a workout regime, whether you have Type 1 diabetes or not. Just wanting to be healthy and fit is a noble goal, but it’s not specific enough to keep you motivated and give you a clear path to success. I always ask my clients to spend the time necessary to think about what you really want and write down very specific short and long-term goals. The key word here is to be realistic. A long-term goal might be to run a marathon while a short-term goal might be a 5K. It could be improving your strength by X%, do 10 pushups, be able to walk around the block without being winded, lose X pounds, or whatever is important and motivating for you. There are no bad health goals, only too vague ones. When you have a clear goal, you can start working towards it, measure your progress, and make changes to your plan if you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

5 Best Exercises For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, exercise offers surprising benefits. As it lowers your stress levels, it lowers your blood sugar level. How much exercise is right for you? For people with diabetes, The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends 150 minutes of aerobic exercise each week. Exercise is so important for people with diabetes that the American Diabetes Association recommends that these patients miss no more than two days of aerobic exercise in a row. 5 exercises for people with diabetes There are many exercises that will benefit people with diabetes. Here are five we recommend: Walking — Because anyone can do it almost anywhere, walking is the most popular exercise and one we highly recommend for people with diabetes. Thirty minutes to one hour of brisk walking, three times each week is a great, easy way to increase your physical activity. Tai Chi —This Chinese form of exercise uses slow, smooth body movements to relax the mind and body. In 2009, researchers at the University of Florida studied 62 Korean women assigned to one of two groups—a control group and an exercise group that began a regular practice of Tai Chi. Those who completed the tai chi sessions showed significant improvement in blood sugar control. They also reported increased vitality, energy and mental health. Yoga — A traditional form of exercise, yoga incorporates fluid movements that build flexibility, strength and balance. It is helpful for people with a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. It lowers stress and improves nerve function, which leads to an increased state of mental health and wellness. According to the ADA, yoga may improve blood glucose levels due to improved muscle mass. Dancing —Dancing is not only great for your body. The mental work to remember dance ste Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fitness

Diabetes And Fitness

Tweet Knowing that you have to exercise and how to actually do it are two different things. The type, level and duration of physical activity that you undertake as a diabetic will depend on what is suitable for you, something you should agree with your doctor or healthcare team. We are developing our Fitness and Exercise area to encompass the information any diabetic would want to know about sports, fitness and exercise in relation to diabetes. Fitness and Exercise Guides The fitness and exercise guides look at keeping active, how sports can affect your blood sugar and how to prevent hypoglycemia during physical activity. People with diabetes are encouraged to exercise regularly. Gyms are ideal settings for people who want to lead an active lifestyle. Having diabetes needn’t be a barrier to actively enjoying sports and exercise. Type 2 diabetes is very closely associated with weight. Weight Loss Guides The weight loss section deals with losing weight through diet, exercise, keeping your motivation and more serious measures such as surgery and pills. What is the best kind of physical activity to help prevent or manage diabetes? The best type of physical activity will depend on your individual situation. Generally, aerobic exercise, strength training and flexibility training should be combined to form a comprehensive exercise routine. What is aerobic exercise and how can it help diabetes? Aerobic exercise increases how fast your heart beats, raises your breathing rates, and works your muscles out. For the average person trying to lose weight, approximately 30 minutes per day, around five days a week should yield clear results. However, if you are starting out on exercise and haven’t been active, much less than that can make a real difference. Aerobic exercise for diab Continue reading >>

Tailor-made Training To Suit Your Diabetes Condition

Tailor-made Training To Suit Your Diabetes Condition

Exercise is so powerful it’s almost like taking medicine. But a prescription that works for you won’t be ideal for everybody with diabetes. That’s why it’s important to work with your doctor to customize your exercise plan to fit your circumstances, starting with which kind of diabetes you have and how you’re treating it now. Whichever strategy you choose, you’ll want to bring blood sugar down — but not too far. To keep close tabs on it, test an hour before your workout, then again a half hour later to find out if your levels are rising or falling. If they’re falling and on the low side, you may want to eat about 15 grams of carbohydrate before you start exercising. If your blood sugar is high and rising, you may need more insulin. Once your blood sugar becomes more stable, your doctor may allow you to monitor less often, but self-testing following a workout is always a good idea. The readings you get will help clarify how exercise should work into your overall diabetes-management plan, which will vary from one situation to the next. People with type 1 diabetes need to approach exercise with extra caution. If you work out too soon after taking insulin, the glucose-lowering tag team of insulin plus exercise can be too much of a good thing and lower your blood sugar to dangerous levels. On the flip side, having too little insulin in your blood while you exercise can make blood sugar build up and potentially cause ketoacidosis. To ensure your safety, check with your doctor about taking steps like the following: Avoid peak hours. Try to time your workout so that you’re not exercising when insulin activity peaks, often within the first hour or two of an injection, depending on which type you use. Adjust your dose. You may be able to drop your daily insulin Continue reading >>

The Insulin Sensitivity Exercise Plan

The Insulin Sensitivity Exercise Plan

The Insulin Sensitivity Exercise Plan is a carefully designed, essential component on your path toward a healthier and more functional lifestyle. Exercise can actually be a form of natural medicine to help you to increase your insulin sensitivity. Why have so many exercise plans failed to work for you? If you have had experiences similar to many of our customers, you may be wondering how to take one more leap of faith after trying fad diets, taking a “magic pill,” or ordering exercise machines that promise to take six inches off your waist in three weeks. Unrealistic claims and expectations, a lack of understanding the important psychological and neurological factors, missing support systems, rigid structures, limited variety, and poorly designed plans all contribute the disappointment many of us have faced. We understand. That’s why a fundamental requirement in the design of our program was to structure it in a way that maximized your ability to achieve long-term success. If that makes you a little skeptical, please stay tuned, we’re going to show you how to transform your experience of exercise. Our approach and process is also designed to work in conjunction with the nutritional changes you are making. You’ll soon learn how these programs complement each other to further support your ability to succeed. First, we want you to understand how we’ve structured this exercise program in order to help you achieve significant improvements in your health and fitness. This isn’t the typical exercise plan. The overall objective of this unique program is to delay, or even reverse the symptoms and conditions that manifest as a result of insulin resistance. A unique structure to increase your insulin sensitivity First, this plan has two distinctive components – “ Continue reading >>

A Workout Program For Diabetes

A Workout Program For Diabetes

This article applies to type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes (within the limits of exercise for pregnancy), and pre-diabetes. Ask your doctor about exercise if you have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes usually occurs later in life and is mostly a lifestyle disease that results from obesity and lack of exercise. Insulin may be insufficient or the cells that take up glucose may be resistant to the action of insulin. Ultimately, the result can be the same as in type 1 diabetes, that is, a complete failure of the beta cells and insulin supply. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy, and although potentially serious, it is usually a temporary event with full recovery after childbirth as long as weight is controlled. It could suggest susceptibility to diabetes later in life. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose is abnormally high but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Without attention to diet, weight loss, and exercise, a progression to diabetes is often inevitable. Lifestyle Approaches to Managing Diabetes The Diabetes Prevention Program and similar trials showed that attention to lifestyle with nutrition and exercise, and a weight loss of 7% to 10% of body weight, can reverse pre-diabetes. Other than weight loss, for people with diabetes and pre-diabetes, formal exercise programs help manage blood glucose by making insulin action more efficient and by using and enhancing the storage of blood glucose in muscle, thereby lowering abnormal blood glucose levels. This efficient function of insulin is described in the term “insulin sensitivity.” Weight training can build extra muscle and therefore increase the storage capacity for glucose. Glucose is stored with water as “glycogen.” This aspect may be particularly important as we age and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health: Add Resistance Training To Your Workout

Diabetes Health: Add Resistance Training To Your Workout

You've been walking, swimming, or cycling to hit your goal of 30 minutes of aerobic exercise just about every day. That's fabulous! But do you schedule in any resistance training? If not, you'll want to read why two diabetes exercise experts think you should and how they suggest you get started. What's resistance training? Resistance training is any exercise that causes your muscles to contract against something. The effort makes the muscle stronger, says Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist and athlete who has lived with type 1 diabetes for 44 years. Colberg is the author of The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan (Da Capo Press, 2005). Adults -- at any age -- can benefit from resistance training. People older than 50 can benefit the most because of age-related muscle loss. Also, with more muscle mass, your body increases its ability to store the blood glucose that comes from the foods you eat. Regular resistance training can lower your blood glucose level. What are common types of resistance training? Exercises that incorporate resistance bands, dumbbells, weight machines, or even your own body weight are considered resistance training. Colberg suggests starting with inexpensive resistance bands found at discount stores such as Wal-Mart and Target, or even just household items such as bottles of water or cans of food. If you're ready to step it up, buy a set of dumbbells. A pair of 5-pound dumbbells costs around $10. Start with 2- to 3-pound dumbbells and work up to 5 pounds. Ten pounds is plenty for most people. Does adding resistance training to cardio exercise help my diabetes? "Studies show that it's the combination of aerobic exercise and resistance training that may be more beneficial in lowering A1C than aerobic training alone," says Carla Cox, Ph.D., RD, CD Continue reading >>

8 Best Workouts For Diabetes

8 Best Workouts For Diabetes

No doubt you’ve heard about the wonders of exercise (how it helps you lose weight, sleep better, and feel more energetic), but for people who have diabetes, exercise is absolutely essential. "Trying to manage diabetes without being physically active is like a singer performing without a microphone," says Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, author of Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical… Continue reading >>

Exercise

Exercise

Everybody benefits from regular exercise. If you have diabetes, or are at risk of diabetes it plays an important role in keeping you healthy. For a person with diabetes exercise helps: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress. Warning- Don’t take part in strenuous physical activity if you are feeling unwell or have ketones present in your blood or urine. Before commencing a regular exercise program see your doctor for a full medical examination. Initially take it slow - you don’t want to start off too hard, if you are not used to the exercise you will be sore the next day and this will not make exercising a fun experience! Over time, you can slowly increase the intensity of the exercise. If you have any diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, you should talk to your doctor or an accredited exercise physiologist before you start increasing the intensity of your exercise. Anything that gets you moving. Here are some suggestions for you to discuss with your doctor: Walking Swimming Cycling/ exercise bike Dancing Gardening Golfing Weight training Tai Chi Water aerobics Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e.g. taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting up to change the TV station instead of using the remote control, housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time. For good health, you should be doing about 30 minutes of exercise every day. If this is not possible, then this time can be divided in 3 x 10 minutes sessions. You can break up exercise throughout the day. If you need to lose weight, 45-60 minutes everyday. You do not need to puff to gain the benefi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

A consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association For decades, exercise has been considered a cornerstone of diabetes management, along with diet and medication. However, high-quality evidence on the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes was lacking until recent years. The present document summarizes the most clinically relevant recent advances related to people with type 2 diabetes and the recommendations that follow from these. Our recently published technical review on physical activity/exercise and type 2 diabetes (1) includes greater detail on individual studies, on prevention of diabetes, and on the physiology of exercise. The present statement focuses on type 2 diabetes. Issues primarily germane to type 1 diabetes will be covered in a subsequent technical review and ADA Statement. The levels of evidence used are defined by the ADA in ref. 2. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PREVENTION OF TYPE 2 DIABETES Two randomized trials each found that lifestyle interventions including ∼150 min/week of physical activity and diet-induced weight loss of 5–7% reduced the risk of progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes by 58% (3,4). A cluster-randomized trial found that diet alone, exercise alone, and combined diet and exercise were equally effective in reducting the progression from IGT to diabetes (5). Therefore, there is firm and consistent evidence that programs of increased physical activity and modest weight loss reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in individuals with IGT. EFFECTS OF STRUCTURED EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND BODY WEIGHT IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Boulé et al. (6) undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of structured exercise interventions in clinical trials of ≥8 weeks duration Continue reading >>

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Regular and safe physical activity is especially important for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar and Exercise The most common concern people have about exercise and diabetes is how to keep their blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Here are some general guidelines to follow: Exercise at the same time every day, if possible. This will help you find out how exercise affects your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you start to exercise, eat a carbohydrate snack. If your blood sugar is 250 or higher, don't start exercising until your blood sugar level is under 250. Exercise with a friend who knows that you have diabetes and knows how to help if your blood sugar gets too low. Make sure you have ID with you that lets people know you have diabetes. If you're sick or have an infection, don't exercise until you're feeling better. Being sick affects your blood sugar. Taking insulin or diabetes pills to lower blood sugar Blood sugar can go too low (hypoglycemia) during exercise if you take too much insulin, the insulin is absorbed too quickly, or the insulin peaks during exercise. It can also happen if you take insulin or pills and don't eat enough carbohydrate. Here are some things you can do: If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you exercise, eat at least 30 grams of carbohydrate before you begin. This will help keep your blood sugar level from dropping too low during exercise. Bring a carbohydrate snack with you whenever you exercise in case your blood sugar level drops too low during or right after you exercise. If your exercise will last for more than an hour, check your blood sugar after each hour of exercise. If your blood sugar is 100 or less, you should eat a carbohydrate snack. Check y Continue reading >>

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