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Diabetes Exercise Guidelines

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Issues Recommendations For Physical Activity, Exercise

American Diabetes Association Issues Recommendations For Physical Activity, Exercise

The updated position statement comes after a wave of recent research linking long periods of sedentary activity with poor health outcomes. People with diabetes should interrupt long periods of sitting every half hour with light activity, such as walking, leg extensions, or overhead arm movements, according to new recommendations from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The recommendation to move at least every 30 minutes represents a shift for the ADA, which previously called for moving every 90 minutes during long periods of sedentary activity, according to a statement. The full guideline appears in the November issue of Diabetes Care. Three minutes or more of light activity “improves blood sugar management in people who have sedentary jobs and in people who are overweight, obese, and who have difficulty maintaining blood sugars in a healthy range,” the group said. ADA’s updated position, which applies not only when people with diabetes are at work but also when they are at home, comes after a wave of new research connecting long periods of sitting with poor health outcomes: · A March 2016 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that sitting was responsible for 3.8% of all-cause mortality. · Watching TV for extended periods was particularly unhealthy, compared with working at a computer or reading, according to a June 2014 study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. · A January 2015 study in the British Journal of Cancer found that prolonged TV watching was not only associated with diabetes and obesity, but also with higher rates of colorectal cancer. According to the ADA’s statement, the recommendation to boost light activity during sedentary activity is especially important for those with type 2 diabetes (T2D); this grou Continue reading >>

Ada Issues New Diabetes Guidelines For Physical Activity And Exercise

Ada Issues New Diabetes Guidelines For Physical Activity And Exercise

ADA issues new diabetes guidelines for physical activity and exercise ADA issues new diabetes guidelines for physical activity and exercise The ADA releases its first independent recommendations on physical activity and exercise for all patients with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has issued updated guidelines for all patients with diabetes regarding regular, structured physical exercise. The report, published in Diabetes Care, includes a recommendation of 3 or more minutes of light activity, such as walking, leg extensions, or overhead arm stretches, every 30 minutes during prolonged sedentary activities to improve bloodsugarmanagement, particularly for patients withtype 2 diabetes. The new guidelines are the first time that the ADA has issued independent, comprehensive recommendations on physical activity and exercise for all patients with diabetes , including type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well asprediabetes. These updated guidelines are intended to ensure everyone continues to physically move around throughout the dayat least every 30 minutesto improveblood glucosemanagement, stated Sheri R. Colberg-Ochs, PhD, FACSM, consultant/director of physical fitness for the ADA and lead author of the guidelines. This movement should be in addition to regular exercise, as it is highly recommended for people with diabetes to be active. Since incorporating more daily physical activity can mean different things to different people with diabetes, these guidelines offer excellent suggestions on what to do, why to do it, and how to do it safely. The ADA's position statement is based on a review of more than 180 papers of the most recent diabetes research and includes input from leaders in diabetes and exercise physiology from the United States, Cana Continue reading >>

Exercise

Exercise

Everybody benefits from regular exercise. If you have diabetes, or are at risk of diabetes it plays an important role in keeping you healthy. For a person with diabetes exercise helps: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress. Warning- Don’t take part in strenuous physical activity if you are feeling unwell or have ketones present in your blood or urine. Before commencing a regular exercise program see your doctor for a full medical examination. Initially take it slow - you don’t want to start off too hard, if you are not used to the exercise you will be sore the next day and this will not make exercising a fun experience! Over time, you can slowly increase the intensity of the exercise. If you have any diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, you should talk to your doctor or an accredited exercise physiologist before you start increasing the intensity of your exercise. Anything that gets you moving. Here are some suggestions for you to discuss with your doctor: Walking Swimming Cycling/ exercise bike Dancing Gardening Golfing Weight training Tai Chi Water aerobics Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e.g. taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting up to change the TV station instead of using the remote control, housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time. For good health, you should be doing about 30 minutes of exercise every day. If this is not possible, then this time can be divided in 3 x 10 minutes sessions. You can break up exercise throughout the day. If you need to lose weight, 45-60 minutes everyday. You do not need to puff to gain the benefi Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are critical foci for blood glucose management and overall health in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recommendations and precautions vary depending on individual characteristics and health status. In this Position Statement, we provide a clinically oriented review and evidence-based recommendations regarding physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes. Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is planned, structured physical activity. Exercise improves blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight loss, and improves well-being (1,2). Regular exercise may prevent or delay type 2 diabetes development (3). Regular exercise also has considerable health benefits for people with type 1 diabetes (e.g., improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, etc.) (4). The challenges related to blood glucose management vary with diabetes type, activity type, and presence of diabetes-related complications (5,6). Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. TYPES AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF DIABETES AND PREDIABETES Physical activity recommendations and precautions may vary by diabetes type. The primary types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (5%–10% of cases) results from cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, producing insulin deficiency (7). Although it can occur at any age, β-cell destruction rates vary, typically occurring more rapidly in youth than in adults. Type 2 diabetes (90%–95% of cases) resul Continue reading >>

Key Points From The Updated Guidelines On Exercise And Diabetes

Key Points From The Updated Guidelines On Exercise And Diabetes

Key Points from the Updated Guidelines on Exercise and Diabetes 1Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA Edited by: Jonathan Peter Little, University of British Columbia, Canada Reviewed by: Normand Boule, University of Alberta, Canada; Jamie F. Burr, University of Guelph, Canada *Correspondence: Sheri R. Colberg, [email protected] Specialty section: This article was submitted to Diabetes, a section of the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology Received 2017 Jan 14; Accepted 2017 Feb 7. Keywords: physical activity, exercise, diabetes, guidelines, American Diabetes Association This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. No doubt remains that the adoption and maintenance of physical activity is important for overall health and blood glucose management in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) published updated recommendations and precautions about physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes ( 1 ). Given the importance of these topics, it is worth discussing the key changes and updates included in this ADA position statement (PS). Pre-Exercise Health Screening and Evaluation This PS reiterates that pre-exercise medical clearance is not necessary for asymptomatic, sedentary individuals who wish to begin low- or moderate-intensity physical activi Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes has become a widespread epidemic, primarily because of the increasing prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, almost 24 million Americans had diabetes, with one-quarter of those, or six million, undiagnosed (261). Currently, it is estimated that almost 60 million U.S. residents also have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (BG) levels are above normal, thus greatly increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes (261). Lifetime risk estimates suggest that one in three Americans born in 2000 or later will develop diabetes, but in high-risk ethnic populations, closer to 50% may develop it (200). Type 2 diabetes is a significant cause of premature mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular disease (CVD), blindness, kidney and nerve disease, and amputation (261). Although regular physical activity (PA) may prevent or delay diabetes and its complications (10,46,89,112,176,208,259,294), most people with type 2 diabetes are not active (193). In this article, the broader term “physical activity” (defined as “bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that substantially increases energy expenditure”) is used interchangeably with “exercise,” which is defined as “a subset of PA done with the intention of developing physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular [CV], strength, and flexibility training).” The intent is to recognize that many types of physical movement may have a positive effect on physical fitness, morbidity, and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis, classification, and etiology of diabetes Currently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the use of any of the following four criteria for di Continue reading >>

Exercise Guidelines

Exercise Guidelines

Find exercise guidelines for your type: In this section, you will find: Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

First-ever Guidelines On Safe Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes!

First-ever Guidelines On Safe Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes!

As a person with type 1 diabetes who exercises regularly, I can tell you it's pretty much of a guessing game. I have some strategies that I use to keep my glucose in range for my spin class, aerobics, kick box, hiking and other workouts, but they are far from fool-proof -- and I've yet to find any really solid advice on BG management during these sweat-fests. So I for one am really intrigued to see the first-ever official guidelines on managing exercise with T1D published in The Lancet journal last week as a 14-page report titled “Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement.” This comes on the heels of the ADA's sweeping 2017 Standards of Diabetes Care, which we just reviewed yesterday. The new info-packed paper honing in on exercise was compiled by an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians, including some familiar names like JDRF's Artificial Pancreas lead Aaron Kowalski, and Drs. Bruce Bode of Atlanta Diabetes Associates, Anne Peters of USC Keck School of Medicine, and Lori Laffel of Joslin Diabetes Center. It offers "guidelines on glucose targets for safe and effective exercising with T1D, as well as nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to prevent exercise-related fluctuations in blood sugar." So what did these experts come up with? Well, let me just say that it's a comprehensive and informative paper -- explaining everything from the physiology of diabetes and exercise and the body's differing metabolic responses to aerobic vs. anaerobic activity, to sports energy drinks and the relative benefits of a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet. Disclaimers, and a Green Light The authors are careful to make a few important disclaimers, first and foremost that one-size recommendations do not fit all, so strategies should be built around exer Continue reading >>

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising safely with type 1 diabetes can be quite a challenge. A paper from JDRF funded experts has acknowledged these challenges and published useful exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetes patients and providers. These JDRF experts are part of an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians led by York University Professor Michael Riddell. The paper, called “Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement” which has been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology provides guidelines on how to exercise safely and effectively with type 1 diabetes. Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF Chief Mission Officer and report contributor said in a press release, “Exercise has tremendous benefits for people with T1D, but it can be hard to predict how it will affect their blood glucose and how they feel during and following physical activity,” and that “The lack of reliable information on how to exercise safely has created obstacles for people with T1D who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. These consensus guidelines, as well as JDRF’s new PEAK program, are breaking down those barriers.” The T1D PEAK program (Performance in Exercise and Knowledge) is an initiative by JDRF to help educate people with type 1 as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers on how to exercise safely. Riddell, the lead author speaks to some of these benefits and barriers of exercise, “Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness and blood sugar goals, but for people living with type 1 diabetes, the fear of hypoglycemia, loss of glycemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management are major barriers,” In order to create the guidelines, Riddell and team reviewed observational studi Continue reading >>

New Exercise Guidelines For Type 2 Diabetes

New Exercise Guidelines For Type 2 Diabetes

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have issued a joint position statement establishing new exercise guidelines for people with Type 2 diabetes. These replace the ACSM guidelines issued in the 2000 position stand “Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes.” The new recommendations were developed by a panel of nine experts based on evidence from recent high-quality studies establishing that regular physical activity can prevent or delay the development of Type 2 diabetes and can positively impact factors such as cholesterol, blood pressure, heart health, and quality of life. Most of these benefits, the authors note, are the result of both resistance and aerobic exercise and are achieved through both short- and long-term improvements in insulin action. The panel recommends that people who already have Type 2 diabetes perform at least 150 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise spread out over at least three days of the week, with no more than two consecutive days between exercising. The panel states that for most people with Type 2 diabetes, brisk walking is considered a moderate-intensity exercise, and that the use of a pedometer and goal-setting (such as setting a target number of steps per day) are valuable tools for increasing physical activity. The experts also recommend that resistance exercise such as weight training be done at least twice a week — ideally three times — on days that are not consecutive. The panel suggests that people who are just starting weight training be supervised by a qualified trainer to ensure the most benefit and to minimize the risk of injury. According to Sheri R. Colberg, PHD, an expert in exercise science and internal medicine and the writing chair of the recommendations, Continue reading >>

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise is sure to be on your to-do list if you have diabetes. Get started with these go-to tips: 1. Make a list of fun activities. You have lots of options, and you don't have to go to a gym. What sounds good? Think about something you've always wanted to try or something you enjoyed in the past. Sports, dancing, yoga, walking, and swimming are a few ideas. Anything that raises your heart rate counts. 2. Get your doctor's OK. Let them know what you want to do. They can make sure you're ready for it. They'll also check to see if you need to change your meals, insulin, or diabetes medicines. Your doctor can also let you know if the time of day you exercise matters. 3. Check your blood sugar. Ask your doctor if you should check it before exercise. If you plan to work out for more than an hour, check your blood sugar levels regularly during your workout, so you’ll know if you need a snack. Check your blood sugar after every workout, so that you can adjust if needed. 4. Carry carbs. Always keep a small carbohydrate snack, like fruit or a fruit drink, on hand in case your blood sugar gets low. 5. Ease into it. If you're not active now, start with 10 minutes of exercise at a time. Gradually work up to 30 minutes a day. 6. Strength train at least twice a week. It can improve blood sugar control. You can lift weights or work with resistance bands. Or you can do moves like push-ups, lunges, and squats, which use your own body weight. 7. Make it a habit. Exercise, eat, and take your medicines at the same time each day to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. 8. Go public. Work out with someone who knows you have diabetes and knows what to do if your blood sugar gets too low. It's more fun, too. Also wear a medical identification tag, or carry a card that says you Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Physical Activity

Type 2 Diabetes And Physical Activity

Being regularly active is quite possibly the most important factor for health in people who have diabetes. 1People with poorly controlled diabetes have three to four times’ higher risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease or stroke, than those who do not. 2 Regular physical activity not only improves the body’s ability to control blood sugar but it has a strong positive effect on the ‘risk factors’, such as high blood pressure, obesity and high cholesterol, for cardiovascular disease. Working muscles, compared to resting ones, use more sugar which then leads to lower sugar in the blood. Doing both aerobic activity (which is any sustained movement that makes your heart and lungs work harder) and muscle strengthening exercise improves blood glucose control more than doing either type alone. 3 Your doctor may prescribe you medications for diabetes but it should be used in addition, not as a replacement, to physical activity and a balanced diet. Regular physical activity also gives you more energy, builds confidence and can help you to sleep more soundly at night. You can combine your activity time with family and friends or use it as an opportunity to reflect on things and listen to your favourite music. Physical Activity Recommendations for inactive adults with Type 2 Diabetes Aim to do the following three types of activity: Aerobic activity at relative moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week – one way to approach this is to do 30 minutes on at least five days each week. Muscle strengthening activity on two or more days a week which work all major muscles groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulder and arms) Flexibility exercises on a daily basis Do not worry if you struggle to meet the Guideline, because by Continue reading >>

Exercise Recommendations For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise Recommendations For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants: January 2016 - Volume 29 - Issue 1 - p 1318 ABSTRACTThe American College of Sports Medicine and American Diabetes Association recommend that patients with type 2 diabetes participate in at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise weekly with resistance training two or three times weekly. This article reviews the guidelines, preparticipation cardiovascular screening recommendations, and considerations for patients with diabetes and comorbidities who are planning to participate in regular exercise regimens. Joy A. Dugan is an adjunct assistant professor in the joint master of physician assistant studies/master of public health program at Touro University in Vallejo, Calif. The author has disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise. Earn Category I CME Credit by reading both CME articles in this issue, reviewing the post-test, then taking the online test at . Successful completion is defined as a cumulative score of at least 70% correct. This material has been reviewed and is approved for 1 hour of clinical Category I (Preapproved) CME credit by the AAPA. The term of approval is for 1 year from the publication date of January 2016. For patients with type 2 diabetes, exercise improves blood glucose control and reduces the risk of comorbidities including hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease. 1 According to the CDC, more than 29 million Americans (about 9% of the population) have type 2 diabetes and most are not physically active. 2,3 A joint position statement by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends at least 150 total minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic ac Continue reading >>

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