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Diabetes Exchange List

Carbohydrate Exchanges

Carbohydrate Exchanges

For foods without labels, use Carbohydrate Exchange Lists. Foods with a similar amount of carbohydrate per serving size are grouped together, and one carbohydrate exchange equals 15 grams of carbohydrate. What about foods without labels? Not all foods carry Nutrition Facts labels, so another way to count carbohydrates is to use Carbohydrate Exchange Lists. In the exchange system, foods with a similar amount of carbohydrate per serving size are grouped together. The foods within each list can be “exchanged” for one another during meal planning, and you end up with about the same amount of carbohydrate. One carbohydrate exchange equals 15 grams of carbohydrate. ONE CARBOHYDRATE EXCHANGE EQUALS 15 GRAMS OF CARBOHYDRATE. The Exchange Lists for Meal Planning is a helpful meal-building tool. You have the flexibility to mix and match your carbohydrate food choices, while staying within your carbohydrate budget for each meal. For example, if your goal is 45 grams of carbohydrate per meal, you may eat 3 exchanges of carbohydrate at each meal. Let’s put this into play: Let’s say you wanted to have some rice at lunch. One exchange of rice is 1/3 cup of cooked rice. If your goal is 45 grams of carbohydrate at a meal, then you can eat 1 cup of rice (or 3 exchanges of carbohydrate). So that’s 3 exchanges x 15 grams carbohydrate per exchange = 45 grams of carbohydrate. In the mood for a different meal? Using the same goal of 45 gram carbohydrate per meal, you could also choose: Each food item listed above equals 1 carbohydrate exchange – so that’s a total of 3 exchanges, or 45 grams of carbohydrate. Remember that the exchange system merely lists SERVINGS of carbohydrate that equal 15 grams of carbohydrate. Don’t confuse SERVING SIZE with PORTION SIZE. The portion size Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Planning: Exchanges

Diabetes Meal Planning: Exchanges

If you have diabetes, chances are, at some point, your doctor or maybe a dietitian has talked to you about your “diet.” Maybe you were given a “diabetic diet” to follow at some point. Or maybe you were given a list of foods to eat and foods to avoid. Perhaps you’re counting carbs or fat grams. Meal planning is a key part of diabetes self-management. Medical nutrition therapy Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is the term used to describe the “diagnostic, therapy, and counseling services” provided by a registered dietitian (RD) for disease management — in this case, for diabetes. The goals of MNT are to: • Promote and support healthful eating patterns to improve overall health • Reach individualized blood sugar, blood pressure, and lipid goals • Achieve and maintain a healthy body weight • Delay or prevent complications of diabetes Meal-planning approaches are not “diabetic diets.” Rather, they’re meant to be viewed as healthful ways of eating that can lead to improved diabetes and weight control. An RD can help you determine what approach is best for you, especially if you’re unsure. This week, we’ll look at one of the approaches that’s been around for a long time: the diabetes exchange system. Diabetes exchanges The diabetes or food exchanges have been around since about 1950. Prior to this time, there was no organized way of helping people with diabetes manage their food choices. The American Diabetes Association, the American Dietetic Association, and the U.S. Public Health Service teamed up to provide a solution, creating what is known as the exchange system. The goal was to provide an educational tool for people with diabetes that would provide consistency with meal planning while promoting a wide variety of foods for overall health Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Exchange List (exchange Diet)

The Diabetic Exchange List (exchange Diet)

The Diabetic Exchange Lists represent food choices a diabetic can make that are similar enough in nature to be exchanged for other foods on the list. This is a meal planning system for diabetics that was created by a committee of the American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetes Association for diabetics who want to use diet as a means of controlling their blood sugar levels. The exchange list was created mainly for those individuals who suffer from type 1 or type 2 diabetes; however, it can be used by anyone who needs a particular diet and even those who want to eat healthy foods as part of their daily diet plan. The foods on the exchange list are all basically healthy for you and can be used by anyone. The exchange list divides foods into six different food groups that are different when it comes to their fat, protein, carbohydrate, and calorie counts. Each item on the exchange list consists of foods that are similar to one another. Each item on a food exchange list contains foods that are basically the same when it comes to their fat, protein, carbohydrate, and calorie counts when compared to other foods on the list. When using the exchange list as part of your meal plan, you will likely see that the choices vary in the amount of food you can eat. This is because the exchange list is based on the weight of the food and some foods weigh more than others but have the same amount of nutrients when compared to other foods on the list. The Food Types on the Exchange List The different types of food on the exchange list includes the following: Starches and breads Meat (which is divided into very lean, lean, medium-fat, and high-fat categories) Vegetables Fruits Milk (which is divided into skim, low fat, and whole milk products) Fat Foods that can be exchanged wit Continue reading >>

Exchange List For An 1800 Calorie Diabetic Diet

Exchange List For An 1800 Calorie Diabetic Diet

The American Diabetes Association and the American Dietetic Association developed the diabetic exchange diet to help manage weight and blood sugar for the diabetic. The diet divides foods into groups based on similarities in calorie and carbohydrate contents. Food items within each group can be exchanged for one another. The 1,800-calorie diabetic diet is appropriate for active women and men with diabetes. You should consult your doctor before starting this or any other diet plan. Video of the Day Starches are a major source of carbohydrate in the diet. Diabetics need to control the amount of starch in their diets to help control blood sugar. Whole grains offer a better option than refined grains, so you should consider options carefully. If you follow the 1,800-calorie diabetic exchange diet, you can have 10 starch exchanges a day. A starch exchange is equal to a 1 ounce bagel, half an English muffin, one slice of bread, 3/4 cup of cold cereal, 1/2 cup of peas or corn, 1/2 cup of sweet or white potato, five crackers and 1/3 cup of rice or pasta. Fruits are also a source of carbohydrates in the diet. Diabetics following the 1,800-calorie diabetic exchange diet can have three fruit exchanges a day. A fruit exchange is equal to 1 small apple or orange, 4 ounces of banana, 12 cherries, 17 grapes, 1/2 cup unsweetened canned fruit, 2 tablespoons of dried fruit, 1 cup of melon or 1/2 cup of orange juice. Diabetics should choose whole fruit over the juice because the added fiber in the fruit helps to control hunger and prevents blood sugar spikes. Low-fat and fat-free milk and yogurts are recommended for the diabetic to limit their intake of saturated fat, and the risk of heart disease. Two milk and yogurt exchanges are recommended a day on the 1,800-calorie diabetic exchange Continue reading >>

1,200 Calorie Diabetic Food Exchange

1,200 Calorie Diabetic Food Exchange

Nutrition plays a major role in managing diabetes. To keep blood glucose and insulin levels within a goal range, people who have diabetes can use a variety of strategies such as carbohydrate counting and the diabetes exchange. If you are overweight, your physician may recommend a 1,200-calorie exchange meal plan. Losing excess weight helps your body regulate blood sugar better. Follow a 1,200-calorie plan under your doctor's supervision, because this is a very low-calorie diet. Video of the Day The diabetes exchange list is a method of ensuring you get the same amount of nutrients and calories each meal. The goal is to reach and maintain a healthy weight and maintain your goal blood-glucose level. Typically, a doctor or dietitian prescribes this type of diet. The exchange list groups foods together that have roughly the same amount of protein, carbohydrate, fat and calories. This allows you to swap out, or exchange, foods on the list without worrying about counting calories or carbohydrates. Using the Exchange for Meal Planning To use the exchange, you'll need the full exchange list to plan your meals. Your doctor or dietitian can provide you with a copy of the American Diabetes Association's "Exchange List for Meal Planning." The list is broken down by section and includes a section for starches, fruit, milk, vegetables, protein, fats, other carbohydrates and condiments. To plan a meal, choose items from the exchange list for each meal, based on the guidelines your doctor sets for you. To reach a total of 1,200 calories using the exchange list, an example is to choose five starch exchanges, five meat exchanges, four fat exchanges, three non-starchy vegetable exchanges, two fruit exchanges and two milk exchanges each day. The goal is to distribute the exchanges evenly t Continue reading >>

1,400-calorie Diet Exchange Servings

1,400-calorie Diet Exchange Servings

The exchange diet is a system put together by the American Dietetic Association and groups foods based on how they affect your blood sugar. Foods are grouped into starches, meats, non-starchy vegetables, fruits, milk, fats and a few smaller categories, including fast foods. Exchanged foods within the same group have similar effects on blood sugar levels, which is especially important if you have diabetes. Based on a 1,400-calorie diet, limit the servings you consume from each group to avoid going over your allotted exchanges. You can have seven starch exchanges for a 1,400-calorie diet. Starch exchanges have 15 grams of carbohydrates, less than 3 grams of protein, less than 1 gram of fat and about 80 calories. One exchange of starch is a slice of wheat bread, 1/2 cup of oatmeal, 1/3 cup of pasta or rice or 3 cups of popcorn. Starchy vegetables, beans and legumes also fit into this exchange group. Single exchanges of these foods includes 1/2 cup of corn, a 3-ounce baked potato, 1/2 cup of mashed sweet potato, as well as 1/2 cup of baked beans or lentils. Plan your meals each day and aim to include a serving from each group at every meal or snack. For example, to use your seven starch exchanges, have two exchanges at breakfast, two at lunch, one as a mid-afternoon snack and two exchanges at dinner. Meat Exchanges Meat, seafood, eggs and cheese are all included in the meat group. You can have five meat exchanges on a 1,400-calorie diet, but you need to stick to lean meats and seafood to avoid consuming too much fat and too many calories. One exchange of lean meats has no carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein, less than 3 grams of fat and 45 calories. Lean-meat options include skinless chicken, beef sirloin, pork tenderloin, fish, shellfish and lamb chops. Meats are counted by Continue reading >>

The Exchange System | Diabetes Health

The Exchange System | Diabetes Health

We dont use them anymore, said my certified diabetes educator when I asked for a copy of the exchange lists used for meal planning. Many doctors, however, still use the exchange system. This meal planning system has survived for some 50 yearsdespite being somewhat eclipsed in recent years by the more precise practice of carb counting. Especially for those recently diagnosed with diabetes who are just beginning to make dietary changes, the exchange system helps to keep things simple. In addition, its versatile, and it teaches sound nutrition. The exchange system groups similar kinds of foods into various exchange listsfor instance, theres a fruit list, a vegetable list, a starch list, and others. Portion sizes are specified for each food. You should be able to exchange any food on a list for another food on the same list, because they are designed to have the same amount of calories, carbs, fat, and so on. The starch list, for example, includes bread, tortillas, pasta, rice and starchy vegetables like potatoes. Each serving provides approximately the same nutrients, and they are all interchangeable in your meal plan. Your meal plan tells you how many servings from specific lists you can have at each meal. Meeting with a registered dietitian is the best way to help you individualize the plan and to determine the calorie count and distribution of meals that are right for you. If youve been frightened by expectations of a diet that tells you what you cant eat, youll be delighted to discover that new, popular options are available on todays exchange lists. This versatility, while not all-inclusive, provides plenty of choices and will help you adhere to the plan. Those who dont know the difference between a carb and a calorie soon learn. The exchange system shows that carboh Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Diet Exchange List Is Not A Weight-​loss Plan

The Diabetic Diet Exchange List Is Not A Weight-​loss Plan

Recently, I saw that a friend of mine had posted on her refrigerator a simplified list of food exchanges for diabetics. She does not have diabetes, so I asked her why she would need a diabetic diet exchange list. She said that she wants to lose weight. I tried to explain that the exchange system is not a weight-​loss plan. Its purpose is to help people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-​dependent diabetes) figure out how much insulin to inject. She said that she was using the list to help her count calories. I tried to explain that counting calories is not an effective way to lose weight. She looked at me as if I’m nuts. She believes that she knows far more about dieting and weight control than I do. After all, she has been dieting for years because of her stubborn weight problem. She therefore has years of experience in counting calories and estimating portion sizes. She’ll diet and lose a few pounds, then gain them right back. I have no personal experience with dieting. Because I have eaten a low-​fat, high-​fiber, starchy diet all of my adult life, I have never been overweight. I just eat grains and beans and vegetables and fruit until I feel full. The diabetic exchange system or diabetic exchange list is an approach to meal planning. It was introduced in 1950 by the American Diabetes Association and the U.S. Public Health Service. It has been revised several times since then. The purpose of the exchange system is to help people with type 1 diabetes estimate how much carbohydrate (sugar and starch) is in a meal. Once they know that, they supposedly can figure out how much insulin they will need to keep their blood sugar from going too high or too low after they eat the meal. The idea is that the more carbohydrate you eat, the more insulin you would need. But Continue reading >>

Diabetic Exchange List And Charts

Diabetic Exchange List And Charts

Diabetic Exchange Lists The objective of using diabetic exchange lists is to maintain the proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats throughout the day. Patients should meet with a dietician or diabetes nutrition expert for help in learning this approach. In developing a menu, patients must first establish their individual dietary requirements, particularly the optimal number of daily calories and the proportion of carbohydrates, fats, and protein. The exchange lists should then be used to set up menus for each day that fulfill these requirements. The following are some general rules: The diabetic exchanges are six different lists of foods grouped according to similar calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and fat content; these are starch/bread, meat, vegetables, fruit, milk, and fat. A person is allowed a certain number of exchange choices from each food list per day. The amount and type of these exchanges are based on a number of factors, including the daily exercise program, timing of insulin injections, and whether or not an individual needs to lose weight or reduce cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Foods can be substituted for each other within an exchange list but not between lists even if they have the same calorie count. In all lists (except in the fruit list) choices can be doubled or tripled to supply a serving of certain foods. (For example 3 starch choices equal 1.5 cups of hot cereal or 3 meat choices equal a 3-ounce hamburger.) On the exchange lists, some foods are "free." These contain fewer than 20 calories per serving and can be eaten in any amount spread throughout the day unless a serving size is specified. The exchange list are listed below (they are from various sites): ~Mays~ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Exchange

Diabetic Exchange

Tweet A diabetic exchange diet is designed to allow you easy control over the amount of sugar and cholesterol you allow into your body. A successful diabetic exchange diet will help to control you weight and your sugar levels. It is necessary to carefully measure food in a diabetic exchange diet, and it is generally recommended to eat 3 meals and one snack per day. The diabetic exchange divides foods into 6 specific groups, and measures food per serving size. Try the Food Exchange Calculator A balanced diet will take the correct proportion from each food group, and your dietician will tell you the number of servings that should be eaten from each food group per day. Food in the same group may be exchanged to give variety. Be sure to carefully measure or weigh each food and drink item. Diabetic Exchange food groups This list is certainly not comprehensive, but it does contain a wide variety of foods that conform to the diabetic exchange diet. Some foods may not be included that are perfectly alright to eat, but patients on a diabetic exchange diet should avoid eating foods in the ‘PROHIBITED LIST.’ However, because a food does not appear in the prohibited list, it is not necessarily alright to eat. Bread and Starch 1/2 cup of cooked lima beans 1/2 cup of cooked pasta 1/2 a 6-inch piece of pita bread 1/2 cup of mashed potatoes or a small jacket potato 1/3 cup of cooked rice 1/2 cup of cooked green peas 1/2 a hamburger or hot dog bun 2 rice cakes One 6-inch round small tortilla 1/2 cup of cooked winter squash 1/2 3-inch bagel 1 slice of bread (not oversized) 1/2 cup of cooked cereal 1/2 cup of corn or 1 medium corn on the cob 6 saltine crackers / three 2-1/2-inch square crackers 1 small dinner roll 1/2 cup cooked dried beans (I.E; kidney, pinto, lentils, chick peas, wh Continue reading >>

Making Sense Of The Diabetic Exchange Diet

Making Sense Of The Diabetic Exchange Diet

If you look at dietary exchange lists and feel confused, you are not alone. Long columns of foods and serving sizes can be overwhelming to the eye, but these lists are useful. A complete exchange diet plan includes an exchange list for each of the food groups. It helps people plan meals that manage carbs and blood glucose, maintain a healthy weight, and receive optimal nutritional value for overall well-being. What's on an Exchange List It may help to think of each exchange list as a vending machine. All of the items in a particular vending machine have, per serving size given, the same amount of carbs, protein, fat and calories. Or, to view it another way, the food items in each machine are interchangeable meal-planning selections. The items in a particular exchange list are called exchanges because they are interchangeable. Though the foods taste different, you can swap one item for another as they have similar dietary value. There are typically separate exchange lists for: Starches and breads Vegetables Fruits Milk (with sub-lists for skim, low-fat and whole products) Meats (with sub-lists related to percentages of fat) Fats If you know how many grams of carbohydrate you can have per meal, and you know each item in an exchange list contains an equal number of carbs, meal planning becomes easier. Using the Lists Work with your doctor or dietician to create a plan that meets your specific needs and ask questions until you understand how to implement the plan. Keep a record of your meal and snack food exchanges, and have measuring cups handy to serve yourself the correct portion sizes. The items on the Starch/Bread Exchange List each contain 15 grams of carbohydrate, 0-3 grams of protein, 0-1 grams of fat, and about 80 calories. Whenever possible, choose whole-grain foo Continue reading >>

Exchange System: Diabetes Forecast

Exchange System: Diabetes Forecast

Ever wonder about the "exchanges" included in each Diabetes Forecast recipe? In the past, most people with diabetes followed the exchange system for meal planning. And although carbohydrate counting has generally taken over as the tool of choice, many people still rely on exchanges. Neither method is necessarily better than the other, but some people find that the exchange system guides heart-healthy eating (by rating the leanness of meats) and aids weight management (by grouping foods based on calories as well as carbohydrates). Others prefer carbohydrate counting's precision: By viewing a specific food's nutrition label, you get a more accurate idea of its carbohydrate and calorie content than you would from a generalized list. Here's how the exchange system works: Foods are grouped into categories with similar nutrient makeup-like starches, carbohydrates, meats, fats, fruits, nonstarchy vegetables, and free foods-so little math is involved in meal planning. Any food from a certain category can be exchanged for another on the list since they're similar in the amount of carbohydrate, calories, fat, and protein. (But note: Serving sizes vary for each food item.) Before you decide to start this meal plan, schedule an appointment with a registered dietitian who can familiarize you with the system and individualize it to your specific needs. A dietitian will be able to tell you how many exchanges from each category you can eat per meal. A slice of bread, half an English muffin, and a half cup of oats each counts for one starch exchange. If your meal plan allows for two starch exchanges at breakfast and you typically nosh on an English muffin, you would substitute with two slices of toast or a cup of oatmeal. Zesty Salmon Burgers, for instance, will use up half of a carboh Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food Exchanges Made Easy

Diabetic Food Exchanges Made Easy

The food exchange system can make eating and meal planning with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes much easier. Understanding the basics of the food exchange system can also help you manage blood glucose levels. In the food exchange system, food is categorized into 3 main groups: Carbohydrates Protein (eg, meat) and protein substitutes (eg, eggs, cheese, soy) Fats The Carbohydrates Group The Carbohydrates group is further broken down into bread/starch, fruit, milk, other carbohydrates (sugar and sweets), and vegetables. When a meal plan says 2 1/2 carbohydrate exchanges (1 bread/starch, 1 fruit, 1/2 milk), it means that there are many servings for those kinds of carbohydrates. You can refer to food exchange lists for the exact measurement of carbohydrates in food—these lists are posted in almost every diabetic cookbook, or refer to the diabetic exchanges listed at the end of each recipe. For example, for those 2 1/2 carbohydrate exchanges, you might choose 1 slice of bread, 1 medium fresh peach, and 1/2 cup of skim milk. You could also choose 1/2 cup of cooked pasta, 1 cup of cubed melon, and 1/2 cup of nonfat yogurt. In general, 1 carbohydrate exchange (bread/starch, fruit, and milk) provides 12 to 15 grams of carbohydrates. Since a serving of vegetables only has 5 grams of carbohydrates, it takes 3 vegetables to equal 1 carbohydrate exchange. The Protein Group The Protein group is broken down into very low-fat protein, low-fat protein, medium-fat protein, and high-fat protein. A protein exchange provides 7 grams of protein and varying amounts of fat. Again, look to a food exchange list or the exchanges listed at the end of each recipe for the amount of protein exchange for each serving. The Fats Group The Fats group is divided into monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, Continue reading >>

Food Exchange (us)

Food Exchange (us)

Tweet In 1950, the US Food Exchange list was developed by the American Dietetic Association, the American Diabetes Association and the US Public Health Service to target meal planning problems. The aim of this concept was to provide people with diabetes with the tools to incorporate consistency in their meal planning and include a wider variety of foods. Carbohydrate exchanges are 15g per portion, which is different to the United Kingdom carbohydrate portions of one per 10g. You should not change to another method of counting food values if you use the US Food Exchange as this may require changing your medication if you have diabetes. What is food exchange? The word exchange refers to the food items on each list which may be substituted with any other food item on the same list. One exchange is approximately equal to another in carbohydrate, calories, protein and fat within each food list. The last published version of the Exchange Lists for Meal Planning was published by the American Diabetes Association and the American Dietetic Association in January 2013. These food exchange lists can be used to assess serving sizes for each food group. Diabetic exchange A diabetic exchange diet is designed to allow you easy control over the amount of sugar and cholesterol you allow into your body. A successful diabetic exchange diet will help to control your weight, BMI (Body Mass Index) and your sugar levels. It is necessary to carefully measure food in a diabetic exchange diet, and it is generally recommended to eat three meals and one snack per day. The diabetic exchange divides foods into six specific groups, and measures food per serving size. Try the Food Exchange Calculator A balanced diet will take the correct proportion from each food group, and your dietician will tell yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

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