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Diabetes Europe Vs Usa

Rates Of New Diagnosed Cases Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes On The Rise Among Children, Teens

Rates Of New Diagnosed Cases Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes On The Rise Among Children, Teens

Press Release Contact: Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing among youth in the United States, according to a report published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, entitled “Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012.” In the United States, 29.1 million people are living with diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, and about 208,000 people younger than 20 years are living with diagnosed diabetes. This study is the first ever to estimate trends in new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth (those under the age of 20), from the five major racial/ethnic groups in the U.S.: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that from 2002 to 2012, incidence, or the rate of new diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in youth increased by about 1.8 percent each year. During the same period, the rate of new diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes increased even more quickly, at 4.8 percent. The study included 11,244 youth ages 0-19 with type 1 diabetes and 2,846 youth ages 10-19 with type 2. “Because of the early age of onset and longer diabetes duration, youth are at risk for developing diabetes related complications at a younger age. This profoundly lessens their quality of life, shortens their life expectancy, and increases health care costs,” said Giuseppina Imperatore, M.D., Ph.D., epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Results of this study reflect the nation’s first and only ongoing assess Continue reading >>

Differences In Disease Prevalence As A Source Of The U.s.-european Health Care Spending Gap

Differences In Disease Prevalence As A Source Of The U.s.-european Health Care Spending Gap

The united states spends far more on health care than any European country ( Exhibit 1 ). U.S. per capita spending in 2004 was $6,037, compared with $3,094 in the Netherlands, $3,169 in Germany, and $3,191 in France. Even Switzerland, which has the highest per capita health spending of any European country, spends only two-thirds as much per capita as the United States spends. 1 EXHIBIT 1 Real Per Capita Health Care Spending, United States And Ten European Countries, 2004 Previous studies have sought to explain these differences in terms of system capacity (that is, physicians, nurses, and hospital beds per capita), access to advanced technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), gross domestic product (GDP) (that is, the income effect), and prices. Neither system capacity nor access to technology appears to account for the higher level of spending in the United States compared with these European countries. 2 However, GDP is strongly related to health care spending. A 1 percent increase in GDP per capita is associated with (at least) a 1.2 percent rise in per capita health care spending, and cross-national variation in per capita GDP explains nearly 90 percent of the variation in this spending. 3 However, even when the relationship between GDP and health spending is taken into account, the United States remains a substantial outlier: Per capita spending is 42 percent higher than predicted. 4 More recent U.S.-European comparisons have attributed the unexplained residual spending in the United States to higher health care pricesa component of spending per treated case. 5 Because prices cannot be observed directly for most services, the conclusion is based on Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) data showing little difference in capacityp Continue reading >>

Growth Differences Between North American And European Children At Risk For Type 1 Diabetes

Growth Differences Between North American And European Children At Risk For Type 1 Diabetes

Growth differences between North American and European children at risk for type 1 diabetes Anita M Nucci , PhD, RD, LD,a Dorothy J Becker , MBBCh,b Suvi M Virtanen , MD, PhD, MSc,c David Cuthbertson , MS,d Barney Softness , MD,e Celine Huot , MD, MSc,f Renata Wasikowa , MD,g Hans Michael Dosch , MD, PhD,h Hans K kerblom , MD, PhD,i Mikael Knip , MD, PhD,j and The TRIGR Study Groupk cNutrition Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland, 00300; Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland and Research Unit, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland, 33014 jDepartment of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere Finland, 33014, Childrens Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital and Folkhlsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland, 00014 aDivision of Nutrition, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 30302 bDivision of Endocrinology, Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, 15224 cNutrition Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland, 00300; Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland and Research Unit, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland, 33014 dUniversity of South Florida, Pediatrics Epidemiology Center, Tampa, FL, 33612 eColumbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, New York, NY, 10032 fCHU Ste. Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3T 1C5 gMedical University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland, 50-376 hThe Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 1X8 iChildrens Hospital and Biomedicum Helsinki Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, 00014 jDepartment of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere Finland, 33014, Childrens Hospital, University of Helsinki Continue reading >>

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

The US has the highest prevalence of diabetes among all developed countries across the world, new data reveals. Almost 11 per cent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 79 suffers from the disease, according to data from the International Diabetes Federation. That’s an estimated 30 million adults across the country. Such is the scale of the issue in the US, the country had nearly two-thirds the total number of cases of all the other 37 developed nations combined, experts warned. In contrast, those nations have a total of 46 million cases between them. The International Diabetes Federation has revealed the US tops the league tables of developing countries with the highest prevalence of the disease, with 10.75 per cent of adults suffering type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Singapore and Malta come in second and third place PREVALENCE OF DIABETES IN ADULTS AGE 20-79 IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES Top Ten - Highest prevalence % Bottom Ten - Lowest prevalence % 1. United States 10.75 1. Lithuania 3.97 2. Singapore 10.53 2. Estonia 4.37 3. Malta 9.92 3. Ireland 4.39 4. Portugal 9.86 4. Sweden 4.7 5. Cyprus 9.55 5. Luxembourg 4.73 6. Andorra 8.52 6. United Kingdom 4.73 7. Slovenia 7.77 7. Australia 5.06 8. Slovakia 7.76 8. Belgium 5.09 9. Spain 7.7 9. Italy 5.12 10. Israel 7.46 10. Greece 5.16 Experts said the high number of people in the US suffering diabetes, is in large part, due to the number living with type 2 diabetes. The condition is closely linked to obesity. Dr Petra Wilson, the CEO of IDF, called on governments to take actions, including introducing taxes on unhealthy food and drink to try and curb the obesity epidemic. He said: 'As rates of type 2 diabetes increase in many countries around the world, we urgently need preventative action. 'IDF asks governments to lead the way i Continue reading >>

Europe Healthier Than U.s.

Europe Healthier Than U.s.

October 02, 2007 |Lisa Girion | Times Staff Writer Costly diseases, many of them related to obesity and smoking, are more prevalent among aging Americans than their European peers and add as much as $100 billion to $150 billion a year in treatment costs to the U.S. healthcare tab, a new study says. The study by researchers at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health found higher rates of several serious diseases -- including cancer, diabetes and heart disease -- among Americans 50 and older as compared with aging Europeans. For example, heart disease was diagnosed in nearly twice as many Americans as Europeans 50 and older. More than 16% of American seniors had diagnosed diabetes, compared with about 11% of their European peers. And arthritis and cancer were more than twice as common among Americans as Europeans. The study published on the Web today by the journal Health Affairs found that Americans were nearly twice as likely as Europeans to be obese (33.1% versus 17.1%), and they also were more likely to be current or former smokers (53% versus 43%). "We expected to see differences between disease prevalence in the United States and Europe, but the extent of the differences is surprising," said lead author Kenneth Thorpe, a public health professor at Emory and former deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Thorpe said the findings suggested that "we spend more on healthcare because we are, indeed, less healthy." The study has implications for the continuing debate over healthcare reform and attempts to illustrate the economic consequences of lifestyle choices often viewed as intensely personal. Does the Emory study mean that Americans are actually sicker than Europeans, or that their illnesses are more likely to be di Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Diabetes Management In Five Countries For General And Indigenous Populations: An Internet-based Review

Comparison Of Diabetes Management In Five Countries For General And Indigenous Populations: An Internet-based Review

Comparison of diabetes management in five countries for general and indigenous populations: an internet-based review 1 Ross Bailie ,2 Zhiqiang Wang ,1 and Tarun Weeramanthri 3 1Centre for Chronic Disease, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia 2Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia 3Western Australia Department of Health, Perth, Australia Received 2010 May 20; Accepted 2010 Jun 17. Copyright 2010 Si et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The diabetes epidemic is associated with huge human and economic costs, with some groups, such as indigenous populations in industrialised countries, being at especially high risk. Monitoring and improving diabetes care at a population level are important to reduce diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. A set of diabetes indicators has been developed collaboratively among the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries to monitor performance of diabetes care. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of diabetes management in five selected OECD countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the US and the UK), based on data available for general and indigenous populations where appropriate. We searched websites of health departments and leading national organisations related to diabetes care in each of the five countries to identify publicly released reports relevant to diabetes care. We collected data relevant to 6 OECD diabetes indicators on processes of Continue reading >>

Cost Of Diabetes Vs Other Diseases – In The Us And Globally

Cost Of Diabetes Vs Other Diseases – In The Us And Globally

What is the cost of diabetes in and within the US? Diabetes has affected approximately 29 million adults and children in the United States. That number does not include the whopping 86 million people who currently have prediabetes and are at a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The most shocking part of all this is that most of the population with prediabetes are not even aware that they have it. These numbers are only expected to grow in the upcoming years if we do not do take any preventive measures against it. According to the leading diabetes website, the American Diabetes Association, the cost associated with diagnosed diabetes was $245 billion in 2012 compared to $174 billion in 2007. That is a 41% increase in just a period of five years. Out of the $245 billion, $176 billion were the direct medical costs of diabetes. The breakdown of the medical expenditures are the following: Hospital inpatient care Prescription medications that help in treating the complications of diabetes Doctor visits Nurses and staying in the hospital Diabetes supplies The costs of medical spending are 2.3 higher in people diagnosed with diabetes than those who do not have diabetes. More than $1 out of $5 of heath care money in the United states is due to diabetes. The price of insulin has increased 3 times between 2002 and 2013. While diabetes is taking the nation by storm, there are other medical conditions that are also draining our pockets. I advise reading the following: We want to look specifically at the numbers and compare them to the cost of diabetes. The comparison will give us a good look at where the future of medical burden is heading and where diabetes sits amongst them all. Cost of other diseases and conditions Let us look at the costs associated with the other top medi Continue reading >>

Startling Results: Us Vs. European Rates Of Chronic Disease

Startling Results: Us Vs. European Rates Of Chronic Disease

Massachusetts health care wonky, with a healthy dose of reality Startling Results: US vs. European Rates of Chronic Disease Startling Results: US vs. European Rates of Chronic Disease This is amazing...New study by Ken Thorpe of Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University comparing US and European rates of chronic disease (summary from Kaiser Daily Report ): Older U.S. adults are twice as likely as older European adults to have a number of chronic diseases, many of which are related to obesity and smoking, according to a study published Tuesday on the Web site of the journal Health Affairs ... For the study, researchers from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University examined information from 2004 on the treatment of chronic diseases among adults ages 50 and older in the U.S. and 10 European nations -- Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland... The study found: 1. Older U.S. adults were twice as likely as older European adults to have heart disease. 2. Older U.S. adults were more than twice as likely as older European adults to have arthritis; 3. 12.2% of older U.S. adults had cancer, compared with 5.4% of older European adults; 4. 16% of older U.S. adults had diabetes, compared with 11% of older European adults; 5. 33.1% of older U.S. adults were classified as obese, compared with 17.1% of older European adults; and 6. 53% of older U.S. adults were active or former smokers, compared with 43% of older European adults. Something's really screwy with a society that produces results like these. Here's Thorpe's comment: "We expected to see differences between disease prevalence in the United States and Europe, but the extent of the differences is surprising," adding, "It is possible that we spend Continue reading >>

Why The French Don't Get As Much Heart Disease

Why The French Don't Get As Much Heart Disease

Why the French don't get as much heart disease Even with high-fat diets, obesity rates are loweris it the wine? How can the French eat a high-fat diet, yet face lower than expected rates of heart disease? This question has puzzled scientists for decades. Some people have thought that wine is such a beneficial drink that it can undo the damage of a rich diet. But research shows that much more than wine drinking affects the health of the French. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. What stresses moms most? Themselves, survey says First, consider the rates of obesity in France. While 31 percent of Americans are so severely overweight that they are technically obese, only 11 percent of the French are obese. And this number is a recent development. In 1997, approximately eight percent of French adults were obese. Because health problems due to excess weight take time to develop, current French health statistics reflect the impact of lower obesity rates in the past. The rates of obesity arent the only difference between France and America. Studies suggest that even moderate overweight can raise the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and several forms of cancer. In the U.S., 64 percent are now overweight or obese. French experts are worried about their countrys recent rise to over 41 percent, but this percentage is considerably less than ours. Physical activity explains some of the lower inci Continue reading >>

Obesity In America Compared To Europe

Obesity In America Compared To Europe

Michelle Fisk began writing professionally in 2011. She has been published in the "Physician and Sports Medicine Journal." Her expertise lies in the fields of exercise physiology and nutrition. Fisk holds a Master of Science in kinesiology from Marywood University. Obesity has become a global health concern.Photo Credit: TAGSTOCK1/iStock/Getty Images Americans are not the only ones seeing their weight creep up on the scale -- obesity rates continue to rise across Europe as well. Europeans are now second only to Americans in the number of people who are overweight or obese. The World Health Organization cites obesity as one of the most prevalent health concerns of this century. If you carry too many extra pounds, youre at risk for a host of physical and psychological problems. Obesity also contributes to rising health-care costs in America and Europe. As societies and governments work to ease the obesity epidemic, you can help yourself by eating nutritious foods and finding time to exercise on a regular basis. If your weight is more than what's considered healthy for a person of your height, youll be labeled as either overweight or obese. Body Mass Index is one of the simplest and most widely used tools to screen for obesity. BMI divides your weight in kilograms by your height in meters squared. If your BMI is less than 18.5, you are deemed underweight. Individuals with a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 are considered healthy. Overweight is described as a BMI between 25 and 29.9, and anything over 30 is categorized as obese. To find out your own BMI, you can use an online calculator. There are limitations to using BMI to assess your body fat though. While BMI measures extra weight, but it can't determine if that extra weight is from fat, muscle or bone mass. It also doesn't t Continue reading >>

Oecd Ilibrary | Diabetes Prevalence

Oecd Ilibrary | Diabetes Prevalence

This fourth edition of Health at a Glance: Europe presents key indicators of health and health systems in the 28 EU countries, 5 candidate countries to the EU and 3 EFTA countries. This 2016 edition contains two main new features: two thematic chapters analyse the links between population health and labour market outcomes, and the important challenge of strengthening primary care systems in European countries; and a new chapter on the resilience, efficiency and sustainability of health systems in Europe, in order to align the content of this publication more closely with the 2014 European Commission Communication on effective, accessible and resilient health systems. This publication is the result of a renewed collaboration between the OECD and the European Commission under the broader "State of Health in the EU" initiative, designed to support EU member states in their evidence-based policy making. Diabetes is a chronic disease characterised by high levels of glucose in the blood. It occurs either because the pancreas stops producing the insulin hormone (type1 diabetes), or through a combination of the pancreas having reduced ability to produce insulin alongside the body being resistant to its action (type2diabetes). People with diabetes are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke if the disease is left undiagnosed or poorly controlled. They also have higher risks for sight loss, foot and leg amputation due to damage to the nerves and blood vessels, and renal failure requiring dialysis or transplantation. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Here Are The Numbers For Italy And The World

Diabetes, Here Are The Numbers For Italy And The World

By 2035, the overall diagnosis of the different types of diabetes could reach 595 million cases. This impressive figure is due to changes in lifestyle and eating habits. Even in Italy, there could be 5 million diabetics by 2030. Which population has 382 million people? Whatever continent you thought is wrong. Is not a question of a geographical area, but the world's population of diabetics in 2013, according to the International Diabetes Federation. These alarming numbers (close to the entire population of Europe), but it may rise even more steeply to reach, 595 million people by 2035. Narrowing the field to type 2 diabetes (the form where action can be taken to prevent risk factors), the disease already afflicted 285 million people in 2010, and that figure may rise to 438 million in 2030, representing an increase of 21,000 new cases every day. These figures help us to grasp the urgency of the awareness campaigns, especially in countries like the United States, where it is estimated that today 10% of the population between 20 and 79 years have type 2 diabetes, but also in other areas of the world where the percentage of diabetics was negligible until 2000, the spread of the trend is of major concern, because of the rapid transformation of lifestyles. Consider that in 2010, Asia's share of type 2 diabetes was already 7.6% of the population and will rise to 9.1% in 2030, according to estimates by the International Diabetes Federation. Spread by geographical area If you want to draw a map of this disease, the highest number of people with diabetes in absolute terms is in China, with 98.4 million diagnosed. That is followed by India (65.1 million), the US (24.4 million) and Brazil (11.9 million). In practice, the number of people with diabetes is rapidly growing in both dev Continue reading >>

Data And Statistics

Data And Statistics

The challenge of diabetes There are about 60 million people with diabetes in the European Region, or about 10.3% of men and 9.6% of women aged 25 years and over. Prevalence of diabetes is increasing among all ages in the European Region, mostly due to increases in overweight and obesity, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. Worldwide, high blood glucose kills about 3.4 million people annually. Almost 80% of these deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, and almost half are people aged under 70 years. WHO projects diabetes deaths will double between 2005 and 2030. Risk factors Patterns of disease differ by ethnic group: type 2 diabetes is up to six times more common in people of South Asian descent and up to three times more common among those of African and African-Caribbean origin. Diet: Eating high levels of refined carbohydrates and saturated fat and not enough fruits and vegetables contributes to weight gain, thereby increasing the risk of diabetes. Physical inactivity: Studies have shown that just 30 minutes of moderate exercise a day, five days a week is enough to promote good health and reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes. Overweight and obesity (BMI over 25 kg/m2) have been estimated to account for about 65–80% of new cases of type 2 diabetes. The risk is a function of the age of onset and the duration of obesity, and weight gain during adult life. Overweight people run a lower relative risk than obese people, however the fraction of disease attributable to overweight may be as high as, if not higher than, that due to obesity. This demonstrates the importance of preventing weight gain in all ranges. Low birth weight is associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Age: The older a person is, the greater their risk of dia Continue reading >>

Obesity In America Vs Europe: 2 Maps Explain It All

Obesity In America Vs Europe: 2 Maps Explain It All

Map shows how many inhabitants per country have a BMI higher than 30 In Rubens' time, to pack a few extra pounds was the privilege of the powerful. Hence the adjective Rubenesque, describing the curvaceous ladies that fill out his paintings, who were rotund because they were rich, and all the more desirable for it. A few centuries on, thanks to industrial farming, food is no longer a status symbol and the specter of famine has receded from our collective consciousness. In fact, food abundance is such that the link between calorie intake and social status has not so much been obliterated as it has reversed. In the developed world, virtually everybody now has easy access to cheap, high-calorie fast food and ready meals. Keeping the pounds off requires more time, effort and money than most people can afford. Especially if you live in a ' food desert ', where fast food is plentiful but the elements of a healthy, balanced diet are difficult to find. As a result, the average Body Mass Index (BMI) has shot up across the developed world (and beyond). BMI is a measure of body fat based on an adult's height and weight ( here's how to calculate yours ). If your BMI is under 18.5, you're commonly accepted as being underweight. The 'normal' weight range is from 18.5 to 25. You're overweight from 25 to 30, and obese if you're over 30. Obesity is a medical condition. It means you've accumulated enough body fat for it to negatively impact your health. If you're obese, you have a higher risk of getting diabetes, osteoarthritis and certain types of cancer and/or cardiovascular diseases. Even though obesity affects a rapidly growing number of people, the share of people with a BMI>30 shows a remarkable variation across national and state borders. This map of BMIs in Europe shows Turkey a Continue reading >>

Top 10: Which Country Has The Highest Rates Of Diabetes In Europe? The Uk’s Position Might Surprise You…

Top 10: Which Country Has The Highest Rates Of Diabetes In Europe? The Uk’s Position Might Surprise You…

Every year, the IDF produces a report on diabetes rates in Europe. The latest, Diabetes In Europe Policy Puzzle: The State We Are In, sheds some interesting light on the worst-affected nations. These are the 10 nations hit most heavily by rising diabetes rates. The UK’s position might just surprise you… 10. Cyprus: 10.2 per cent of the population has diabetes The report estimates that Cyprus spends $2,295 on each person with diabetes. Not surprisingly, diabetes care is a big priority for Cyprus. The government has taken positive steps to address the issue, with a large-scale prevention plan to be introduced in 2016. 9. Spain: 10.58 Spain spends $3,090 per person. There are national and regional strategies in place, but diabetes associations aren’t happy with them. They don’t think there’s enough support or resources to make a difference. 8. Malta: 10.69 Malta spends $2,113 per person. Most of their prevention methods focus on lifestyle changes. People are encouraged to eat well, exercise more, and quit smoking. Unlike Spain, diabetes prevention programmes in Malta get a lot of political backing. 7. Macedonia: 11.44 Macedonia spends $403 per person. Their prevention programmes have a strong political backing. However, they don’t have a lot of money to spend. The Macedonian Diabetes Association says: “The funds available are limited and their duration is uncertain due to the many political, organisational and financial changes in our country.” 6. Germany: 11.52 Germany spends $4,943 per person, one of the highest in Europe. Different regions prioritise diabetes more than others, but diabetes isn’t considered a big national concern. There’s not much political commitment to prevention. Neither are there many resources allocated. The IDF report asked a Ge Continue reading >>

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