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Pets, Obesity And Diabetes: An Epidemic In 2016

Pets, Obesity And Diabetes: An Epidemic In 2016

If you’re like me, you’ve become used to hearing about the astronomical incidence of obesity and diabetes within the United States. And, predictions of how many of our children will ultimately develop diabetes is downright scary. Given this information, I wasn’t the least bit surprised to learn that two recent surveys demonstrate that the incidence of obesity and diabetes is also on the rise in our dogs and cats. Obesity survey Every year, the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) conducts a survey that tracks the prevalence of obesity in dogs and cats. The 2015 survey, available on the APOP website, assessed 1,224 dogs and cats who received wellness examinations within 136 veterinary clinics. According to aaha.org, for every animal, a body condition score (BCS) was assessed and reported. This score was based on a five-point scale as well as the animal’s actual body weight. The animals were then classified as being ideal, underweight, overweight, or obese. The APOP survey revealed that approximately 58% of the cats and 54% of the dogs evaluated were overweight or obese. Wow, these percentages are striking! Based on body size alone, more than half of our pets have a significant health issue! The APOP defines obesity as an animal being 30 percent or more above ideal body weight. APOP board member, Dr. Steve Budsberg, notes that there is a lack of consensus amongst veterinarians about exactly how obesity is defined. “Our profession hasn’t agreed on what separates ‘obese’ from ‘overweight.’ These words have significant clinical meaning and affect treatment recommendations.”1 The APOP is pushing for the adoption of a universal pet BCS system. Doing so would allow veterinarians to more consistently and accurately assess their patients, report the Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Incidence Trends For Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 To 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012

Prevalence And Incidence Trends For Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 To 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012

Importance Although the prevalence and incidence of diabetes have increased in the United States in recent decades, no studies have systematically examined long-term, national trends in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes. Objective To examine long-term trends in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes to determine whether there have been periods of acceleration or deceleration in rates. Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed 1980-2012 data for 664 969 adults aged 20 to 79 years from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to estimate incidence and prevalence rates for the overall civilian, noninstitutionalized, US population and by demographic subgroups (age group, sex, race/ethnicity, and educational level). Main Outcomes and Measures The annual percentage change (APC) in rates of the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes (type 1 and type 2 combined). Results The APC for age-adjusted prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes did not change significantly during the 1980s (for prevalence, 0.2% [95% CI, −0.9% to 1.4%], P = .69; for incidence, −0.1% [95% CI, −2.5% to 2.4%], P = .93), but each increased sharply during 1990-2008 (for prevalence, 4.5% [95% CI, 4.1% to 4.9%], P < .001; for incidence, 4.7% [95% CI, 3.8% to 5.6%], P < .001) before leveling off with no significant change during 2008-2012 (for prevalence, 0.6% [95% CI, −1.9% to 3.0%], P = .64; for incidence, −5.4% [95% CI, −11.3% to 0.9%], P = .09). The prevalence per 100 persons was 3.5 (95% CI, 3.2 to 3.9) in 1990, 7.9 (95% CI, 7.4 to 8.3) in 2008, and 8.3 (95% CI, 7.9 to 8.7) in 2012. The incidence per 1000 persons was 3.2 (95% CI, 2.2 to 4.1) in 1990, 8.8 (95% CI, 7.4 to 10.3) in 2008, and 7.1 (95% CI, 6.1 to 8.2) in 2012. Trends in many demograph Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Biggest Epidemic In Human History

Diabetes: Biggest Epidemic In Human History

Remember back in history class, when they talked about the Great Diabetes Epidemic of 1665? Of course you don’t; there was never any such thing. Certainly, there have been many epidemics throughout history. These could be enormously destructive; killing millions, toppling empires, depopulating entire landscapes.1 But diabetes as a mass killer? That’s something new. But that is exactly where we are today. Epidemiologists are warning that the Great Diabetes Epidemic is upon us – right now. The result of the combination of obesity and type 2 diabetes (“diabesity”) is likely to be the biggest pandemic in human history.2 Perhaps the word “epidemic” sounds overly dramatic to some ears. But the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) explains that “epidemic” simply refers to an increase in the number of cases of a disease above what is normally expected in a population in a given area. Relatedly, “pandemic” refers to an epidemic that has spread over several countries or continents, usually affecting a large number of people.3 And so CDC refers quite specifically to the diabetes “epidemic” that currently affects almost 30 million Americans, which is forecast to rise to nearly 55 million people over the next decade.4, 5 This chart illustrates the growth in diabetes in the U.S. through the year 2030: Regarding the spread to other countries, the World Health Organization estimates that the number of people with diabetes grew by nearly 300% from 1980 to 2014, to 422 million worldwide.6 That number is also predicted to rise, to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040.7 Altogether, taking into account both the number of people it will affect, and what it will cost to treat, one researcher has gone so far as to predict that type 2 diabetes is on t Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic Still Has A Disproportionate Impact On Some Americans

The Diabetes Epidemic Still Has A Disproportionate Impact On Some Americans

HuffPost joined The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on World Diabetes Day to discuss the scope of the diabetes epidemic in the United States, including the disproportionate impact on communities of color, among pregnant women and in poor and underserved communities. Please follow along in the video below. Continue reading >>

An American Epidemic

An American Epidemic

ON February 10th thousands of people crowded into a diabetes exhibit in Denver. They waited in lines to test the newest blood sugar meters. Matt Hoover, a star of the small screen, spoke about how he lost 157lb (71kg) and gained a wife. Representatives dispensed gewgaws. “It's an insulated bag,” explained one, “So if you've got a hot chicken...” No one had a hot chicken, though. The diabetic diet can be a Spartan affair. Over at the “Cooking Cardiologist” presentation, a dietician announced that people with diabetes should feel free to enjoy raisins—just not too many raisins. Not so many years ago such a scene would have been strange. Colorado is the kind of healthy, outdoorsy state where everyone seems to have a big dog and SUVs are splattered with mud. It has the lowest rate of obesity in the nation, and not coincidentally, about the lowest rate of diabetes. Just under 5% of Coloradans have been diagnosed with the disease. But that is not all that low. And the fact that it is one of the lowest in the country suggests the extent of the diabetes epidemic in America. The disease has become more than twice as common since 1980, and the rate is rising precipitously. According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 7% of Americans, roughly 21m people, have diabetes. At least 54m Americans have elevated blood sugar levels and are at risk of developing the full-blown disease. Rates are considerably higher among American Indians, African-Americans and Latinos. The economic costs of the disease were conservatively estimated at $132 billion in 2002, and the figure is rising. “If you look forward 10 or 15 years,” says Dr C. Ronald Kahn of the Joslin Diabetes Centre in Boston, “we really won't be able to afford the amount of health care this is goin Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Today, more than 1.7 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese. A diabetes epidemic is underway. According to an estimate of International Diabetes Federation comparative prevalence of Diabetes during 2007 is 8.0 % and likely to increase to 7.3% by 2025. Number of people with diabetes is 246 million (with 46% of all those affected in the 40–59 age group) and likely to increase to 380 m by 2025. The comparative prevalence of IGT is 7.5% in 2007 and likely to go up to 6.0 by 2025. The number of people with IGT is 308 million in 2007 and likely to be 418 m by 2025. (1) Almost 80% of the total adult diabetics are in developing countries. The regions with the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, where 9.2 % of the adult population is affected, and North America (8.4%). The highest numbers, however, are found in the Western Pacific, where some 67 million people have Diabetes, followed by Europe with 53 million. India leads the global top ten in terms of the highest number of people with diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed by China with 39.8 million. Behind them come USA; Russia; Germany; Japan; Pakistan; Brazil; Mexico and Egypt. Two major concerns are that much of this increase in Diabetes will occur in developing countries and that there is a growing incidence of Type 2 Diabetes at a younger age in Continue reading >>

Rising Global Temperatures Could Be Contributing To Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic

Rising Global Temperatures Could Be Contributing To Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic

Growing global temperatures may be playing a part in the rising numbers of people developing type 2 diabetes, suggests new research from the Leiden University Medical Center and the Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide. In 2015, 415 million adults globally were suffering from diabetes, and expectations are that the prevalence will rise by almost 55%, up to 642 million cases by 2040. In high-income countries, 91% of adults affected by diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, it was recently shown that acclimatization of patients with type 2 diabetes to moderate cold for only 10 days already improves insulin sensitivity. Physiologically, cold exposure activates brown adipose tissue (BAT) that has been identified to combust large amounts of lipids to generate heat. Previously, it has been shown that BAT activity is negatively associated with outdoor temperature. A research team headed by Leiden University Medical Center Professor Patrick Rensen set out to investigate if global increases in temperature were contributing to the current type 2 diabetes growth by negatively impacting on glucose metabolism via a reduction in BAT activity. “In the present study, we aimed to assess the association between outdoor temperature and glucose metabolism on a countrywide as well as a global scale,” Prof. Rensen and co-authors said. “We specifically hypothesized that diabetes incidence and prevalence of glucose intolerance increase with rising outdoor temperatures.” The researchers used data on diabetes incidence amongst adults in 50 US states and three territories (Guam, Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands) for the years 1996 to 2009 from the National Diabetes Surveillance System of the Centers for Dis Continue reading >>

Diabetes Epidemic - Diabetes Data

Diabetes Epidemic - Diabetes Data

Diabetes is a national epidemic and is especially prevalent in the South. The Diabetes Belt, identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2011, spans counties in most of the Southern states and reaches up through Appalachia. It's been growing since then, according to the CDC, new counties are being added; the CDC has let out the belt another notch yet it cannot contain the strain. The geographic area affected closely mirrors the "stroke belt," and its population generally is more prone to developing not only diabetes but also other chronic diseases. Nationwide, diabetes rates have nearly doubled in the past 20 years – from 5.5 percent in 1994 to 9.3 percent in 2012. In 2015, North Carolina had 10.7 percent of adults living with diabetes. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and is a serious health condition that increases a person’s risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation of the legs or feet. Carolinas HealthCare System is working to reverse the diabetes trend in our community by focusing on prevention, identifying effective treatments and improving medical care. Our clinicians are sharing best practices so we can continue to see improvement in the more than 100,000 diabetic patients under our care. In 2015, our clinicians effectively managed 74 percent of patients with diabetes and helped them keep their blood sugar under control, and 77.3 percent of patients had their blood pressure or hypertension under control. Our efforts compared to national bench marks show we are performing in the highest percentiles in several key areas including: Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

You’ve become the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal of medicine. A must-read every morning. ” Continue reading >>

If Not Us, Who? Curbing The Diabetes Epidemic Requires A Person-centered Approach

If Not Us, Who? Curbing The Diabetes Epidemic Requires A Person-centered Approach

I know from personal experience how challenging it can be to navigate the health care system. My mother was diagnosed with diabetes at an early age, and as the oldest daughter in a large family, it was up to me to coordinate her care that included frequent hospital stays. I often was frustrated with the fragmented system we found ourselves in, particularly as her condition continued to worsen. The experience convinced me that something had to be done. My mother passed away from complications related to her diabetes. She would have been proud knowing I — along with my colleagues — am fighting for innovative solutions to chronic health conditions. As the seventh leading cause of death in the United States,1 and the leading cause of kidney failure, adult blindness and lower-extremity amputations,2 there's no question that diabetes is a serious public health issue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the adult population, live with diabetes. Together, the direct and indirect costs of diabetes and related complications exacted a toll of $245 billion on our nation's economy in 2012, according to the latest five-year study by the American Diabetes Association. The recent upward trend in diabetes cases is also startling. Since the disease first emerged in the 1980s as a major threat to public health, the number of adults with diabetes has nearly quadrupled. Although much can be attributed to significant advances in diabetes research and treatment, equally important is the role health care providers, community organizations, employers and policymakers have played in addressing several underlying causes of diabetes — socioeconomic conditions such as race, income and level of education. We must continue to take Continue reading >>

Diabetes Epidemic Looms In The United States

Diabetes Epidemic Looms In The United States

Diabetes is considered one of the most expensive chronic conditions in the United States to treat in terms of total dollars spent, and it is becoming increasingly common. It was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. for 2015, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 30.3 million Americans (9.4% of the population) have diabetes, and an estimated 84.1 million people (33.9 % of the population) were prediabetic in 2015, according to the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017, a new report released by the CDC. In 2013, more than $101 billion was spent in the U.S. to diagnose and treat diabetes, according to research by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. And the CDC estimates that one in three U.S. adults are pre-diabetic. The report says that 90 percent of people in the U.S. with prediabetes have not been diagnosed, so they do not know that they have the condition. As a result, they are not aware of the potential health risks posed by diabetes. If untreated, diabetes can result in many other health issues, including: Heart disease Stroke Kidney failure Vision problems including blindness Poor blood circulation Leg or foot amputation About 95% of cases are Type 2 diabetes, also known as “adult onset” diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is also known as “juvenile diabetes.” The CDC report says diabetes prevalence varies significantly: Among adults with less than a high school education, 12.6% had diabetes. Among those with a high school education, 9.5% had diabetes, and among those with more than a high school education, 7.2% had diabetes. People who are prediabetic can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes through exercise and better nutrition, says a new campaign by the American Diabetes Association (ADA Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Abstract The “Diabesity” epidemic (obesity and type 2 diabetes) is likely to be the biggest epidemic in human history. Diabetes has been seriously underrated as a global public health issue and the world can no longer ignore “the rise and rise” of type 2 diabetes. Currently, most of the national and global diabetes estimates come from the IDF Atlas. These estimates have significant limitations from a public health perspective. It is apparent that the IDF have consistently underestimated the global burden. More reliable estimates of the future burden of diabetes are urgently needed. To prevent type 2 diabetes, a better understanding of the drivers of the epidemic is needed. While for years, there has been comprehensive attention to the “traditional” risk factors for type 2 diabetes i.e., genes, lifestyle and behavioral change, the spotlight is turning to the impact of the intra-uterine environment and epigenetics on future risk in adult life. It highlights the urgency for discovering novel approaches to prevention focusing on maternal and child health. Diabetes risk through epigenetic changes can be transmitted inter-generationally thus creating a vicious cycle that will continue to feed the diabetes epidemic. History provides important lessons and there are lessons to learn from major catastrophic events such as the Dutch Winter Hunger and Chinese famines. The Chinese famine may have been the trigger for what may be viewed as a diabetes “avalanche” many decades later. The drivers of the epidemic are indeed genes and environment but they are now joined by deleterious early life events. Looking to the future there is the potential scenario of future new “hot spots” for type 2 diabetes in regions e.g., the Horn of Africa, now experiencing droughts and f Continue reading >>

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

As one of today’s fastest growing health challenges, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in the United States. In fact, the number of Americans diagnosed with diabetes has risen from 10.4 million people in 1998 to 21 million people today, according to the CDC, and the number is expected to rise even more in the near future. The American Diabetes Association projects that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that by 2050, the number of diagnoses will increase by 165 percent. As we recognize American Diabetes Month during November, let’s take a closer look at why more people are developing the disease and what our UnityPoint Clinic providers say we can do to reverse this trend. The Rise of Diabetes in the United States The number of people living with diabetes isn’t just up in the United States, but all over the world. While diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere, the CDC estimates that as many as 29.1 million Americans have diabetes (21 million who are diagnosed and another 8.1 million who are undiagnosed). This means that over 9 percent of the United States population has some form of diabetes. The rise in diabetes incidence across the United States is largely linked to the following three factors: More Americans are becoming overweight or obese and increasingly physically inactive – both known risk factors for diabetes. A person’s chances of developing diabetes increases with age. Now that the baby-boomer population is aging, more people from this generation are being diagnosed with the disease. Type 2 diabetes is especially common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and certain Asian populations, which are all growing populations in the United States. Diabetes Complications Type 2 D Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which blood sugar (glucose) levels are above normal. The rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes in the United States has begun to fall, but the numbers are still very high. The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is working to reverse the diabetes epidemic in New York State by focusing on diabetes prevention, identifying people with prediabetes, and collecting data on prevalence of diabetes to help improve the health of all people with diabetes. Diabetes in New York State 1.6 million New Yorkers (10.0%) have diabetes The percentage of New York State adults who have diabetes increased from 6.3% in 2000 to 10% in 2014 Diabetes in the United States 29.1 million Americans have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2012 is $245 billion For more information, visit: Prediabetes Before people develop diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes first. Prediabetes is a condition where a person's blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes affects 86 million people in the United States (4.5 million New Yorkers), and 90% of the people with diabetes do not know they have it. Without lifestyle changes, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. People with pre-diabetes are also at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and for having heart disease and stroke. The good news is that people can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by: Participating in a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program (NDPP) to learn skills and get resources to help make healthy changes Losing small amounts of weight (5 to 7 percent of total body weight) Making heal Continue reading >>

Half Of Adults In The U.s. Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes, Study Finds

Half Of Adults In The U.s. Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes, Study Finds

A national wake up call to intensify efforts to control the obesity crisis with added focus on diet, exercise and monitoring blood sugar According to a study published online in JAMA today, nearly 50% of adults living in the U.S. have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition where a person already has elevated blood sugar and is at risk to develop diabetes. Diabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, may reflect lack of production of insulin to lower blood sugar (Type 1) or insulin resistance (Type 2), generally the result of obesity, poor diet or lack of exercise leading to the metabolic syndrome. Diabetes is a costly disease in the U.S, racking up an estimated 245 billion in 2012, related to consumption and utilization of health care resources as well as lost productivity, according to the researchers in the study. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, the eyes and kidneys, also resulting in poor wound healing and devastating soft tissue infections. And nearly 71,000 persons die annually due to complications associated with diabetes, based on recent statistics from the American Diabetes Association. Investigators in the study defined undiagnosed diabetes as those persons having a fasting blood sugar greater than 126 mg/dl or a hemoglobin A1C > 6.5 %, a measure of long term glucose control. Pre-diabetes was defined as having a fasting blood sugar 100-125 mg/dl, or a hemoglobin A1C of 5.7-6.4%. Researchers evaluated 5,000 patients who were part of a national survey designed to assess the prevalence of diabetes and explore trends in different subgroups and ethnicities. Results from the study indicated that in 2012, between 12% and 14% of adults had diabetes, the most recent data available. The majority of these diabetics are type 2, the result of poor diet, obesity an Continue reading >>

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