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Diabetes Epidemic In America

An American Epidemic

An American Epidemic

ON February 10th thousands of people crowded into a diabetes exhibit in Denver. They waited in lines to test the newest blood sugar meters. Matt Hoover, a star of the small screen, spoke about how he lost 157lb (71kg) and gained a wife. Representatives dispensed gewgaws. “It's an insulated bag,” explained one, “So if you've got a hot chicken...” No one had a hot chicken, though. The diabetic diet can be a Spartan affair. Over at the “Cooking Cardiologist” presentation, a dietician announced that people with diabetes should feel free to enjoy raisins—just not too many raisins. Not so many years ago such a scene would have been strange. Colorado is the kind of healthy, outdoorsy state where everyone seems to have a big dog and SUVs are splattered with mud. It has the lowest rate of obesity in the nation, and not coincidentally, about the lowest rate of diabetes. Just under 5% of Coloradans have been diagnosed with the disease. But that is not all that low. And the fact that it is one of the lowest in the country suggests the extent of the diabetes epidemic in America. The disease has become more than twice as common since 1980, and the rate is rising precipitously. According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 7% of Americans, roughly 21m people, have diabetes. At least 54m Americans have elevated blood sugar levels and are at risk of developing the full-blown disease. Rates are considerably higher among American Indians, African-Americans and Latinos. The economic costs of the disease were conservatively estimated at $132 billion in 2002, and the figure is rising. “If you look forward 10 or 15 years,” says Dr C. Ronald Kahn of the Joslin Diabetes Centre in Boston, “we really won't be able to afford the amount of health care this is goin Continue reading >>

The Terrifying Rise Of Diabetes, In Every Corner Of The U.s.

The Terrifying Rise Of Diabetes, In Every Corner Of The U.s.

Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S., due to sugary diets and the lack of exercise. If current disease rates continue, one in three Americans will have diabetes by 2050. Over time, the condition can lead to kidney failure, limb amputations and blindness, among other complications. That Data Dude created this interactive map showing the percent of the current population that has been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Colorado stands out by far as the healthiest state by this measure: In many of its counties, 4 percent or less of the population has been diagnosed with diabetes. South Dakota, Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, West Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina are at the opposite end of the scale. In counties in South Dakota, North Carolina, and Mississippi more than 14 percent of the population had been diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The map shows that only 10 counties in the U.S. experienced a decrease in diabetes rates between 2004 and 2012: McCracken County, Kentucky Arlington County, Virginia Hawaii County, Hawaii Beckham County, Oklahoma San Francisco County, California Roosevelt County, Montana Cuming County, Nebraska Mellette County, South Dakota Preston County, West Virginia Logan County, Nebraska In five more counties, in Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Virginia and Washington, rate remained unchanged. But in all the other counties in the U.S. – that’s 2,992 of them – diabetes prevalence has gone up. More stories from Know More, Wonkblog's social media site: - Premature death among American women is on par with Mexico, even though the U.S. spends 10 times as much Continue reading >>

Diabetes Epidemic In Mexico Is Fueled By Deep-fried Tamales And Many Gallons Of Soda : Npr

Diabetes Epidemic In Mexico Is Fueled By Deep-fried Tamales And Many Gallons Of Soda : Npr

A chile-rubbed pork taco is topped with french fries in the Merced market in Mexico City. The taco costs 10 pesos less than 50 cents. Cheap, high-calorie food is contributing to Mexico's obesity problem. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption A chile-rubbed pork taco is topped with french fries in the Merced market in Mexico City. The taco costs 10 pesos less than 50 cents. Cheap, high-calorie food is contributing to Mexico's obesity problem. Anais Martinez is on the hunt in Mexico City's Merced Market, a sprawling covered bazaar brimming with delicacies. "So this is the deep-fried tamale!" she says with delight, as if she'd just found a fine mushroom specimen deep in a forest. The prized tamales are wrapped in corn husks and piled next to a bubbling cauldron of oil. "It's just like a corn dough patty mixed with lard, put in a corn husk or banana leaf, steamed and then deep fried," says Martinez of this traditional Mexican breakfast. "And then after you fry it, you can put it inside a bun and make a torta [sandwich] out of it. So it's just like carbs and carbs and fat and fat. But it's actually really good." And it only costs 10 pesos roughly 50 cents. What's for breakfast? One Mexican option is a deep-fried tamale: a corn dough patty mixed with lard, wrapped in a corn husk or banana leaf and then put in a bun. Carbs upon carbs. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption Martinez is a designer in Mexico City. She studied gastronomy here and now moonlights for a company called Eat Mexico giving street food tours. Deeper in the market there's an area packed with taco stalls. Customers stand at the counters or sit on wobbly plastic stools. The young cooks fry, flip and chop various meats into tortillas. They pound strips of flank steak out on wooden cutting boards. Piles of red c Continue reading >>

Global Diabetes Epidemic

Global Diabetes Epidemic

Photo: Diabetes screening © 2015 Uttam Kamati, Courtesy of K4Health Photoshare How Badly Are Developing Countries Hit? The World Health Organization (WHO)’s first global report on diabetes underscores how diabetes is no longer a disease of predominantly rich nations but is increasing in all regions, including in developing countries. In 2014, there were 422 million cases of diabetes, or 8.5 percent of the world’s population. In 2012 alone, 3.7 million people died from the disease, 1.5 million directly and 2.2 million indirectly. We ask: In which region is diabetes most prevalent? A. Africa B. Americas C. Eastern Mediterranean D. Europe E. South-East Asia Of the six WHO regions, Africa has the lowest prevalence, with 7.1 percent of its population suffering from diabetes. However, diabetes prevalence in Africa has more than doubled since 1980 and 25 million Africans now suffer from the disease, compared to only 4 million in 1980 and it looks like it will continue on a sharp upward direction. Sixty-two million people suffer from diabetes in the Americas, or 8.3 percent of the total population, which is a 344 percent increase since 1980. About one in twelve Americans today has diabetes, compared with one in twenty a generation ago. Nearly one in seven people in the Eastern Mediterranean, or 13.7 percent, suffer from diabetes. There has been an alarming increase in prevalence in this part of the world, which includes the Arabian Gulf countries, Afghanistan, Iran, and Pakistan. The number of sufferers has risen from 6 million in 1980 to 43 million today, a more than 700 percent increase. The Eastern Mediterranean also has the highest mortality rate from diabetes of all WHO regions, 139.6 per 100,000 people aged 20+. With 7.3 percent of its population suffering from diabe Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic In African Americans

The Diabetes Epidemic In African Americans

The Diabetes Epidemic in African Americans The Diabetes Epidemic in African Americans Type 2 diabetes is a condition that affects the way people process food for energy. But its really more than thatits an epidemic thats affecting the health of our nation. Its one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, running up total health care and treatment costs to $174 billion each year. This is especially true for African Americans, who are almost twice as likely to have type 2 diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. But rest assured, there is a lot you can do now to controland even preventdiabetes and lower your risk of complications. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that causes your blood sugar level to be too high. This happens when the body doesnt make enough insulin or cant use the insulin it makes effectively. You could have symptoms like unusual thirst, frequent urination and infections, or blurred vision. Or, you may have no symptoms at all. Over time, untreated diabetes can affect many parts of your body, such as your kidneys, heart, eyes and feet. Compared to our countrys overall population, African Americans (especially African American women) are at a much greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are African American, you are also more likely to have serious complications from diabetes, such as kidney disease, blindness and amputations. And African Americans are twice as likely to die from diabetes compared to non-Hispanic whites with diabetes. Why? For one thing, it runs in the family. If your parent, grandparent or other family member has diabetes, its more likely you will develop the disease. Health conditions like high cholesterol and high blood pressure also contribute to diabetes and its complications. And although African America Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Kids: The Growing Epidemic

Type 2 Diabetes And Kids: The Growing Epidemic

Before the obesity epidemic in the United States, type 2 diabetes was practically unheard of in people under 30. That explains the former name for the disease: adult-onset diabetes. Not long ago, almost all children with diabetes suffered from the type 1 form of the disease, which means their bodies couldn't produce enough insulin. And type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas may produce normal insulin levels but cells become resistant to it, typically took decades to develop. But type 2 diabetes isn't just for adults anymore. The number of children and adolescents with the condition (most of whom are diagnosed in their early teens) has skyrocketed over the last 20 years and is still climbing, prompting experts to call it an epidemic. Because young children who are obese are more likely to become diabetic when they're older, experts are paying particular attention to how much -- or how little -- pre-adolescents eat and exercise. Disease researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) made the prediction that one in three children born in the United States in 2000 will likely develop type 2 diabetes sometime in their lifetime unless they get more exercise and improve their diets. The prediction was especially serious for Latino children. Without changes in diet and exercise, their odds of developing diabetes during their lifetime were about 50-50. Type 2 is not usually as life-threatening or dramatic as type 1 at the time of diagnosis, but it does increase the likelihood that children may develop serious long-term complications in later life such as blindness, kidney disease, and heart disease. With proper medical treatment and a self-care program that incorporates exercise, glucose monitoring, and nutrition, however, your child can likely keep his or h Continue reading >>

Chronic Disease Prevention And Health Promotion

Chronic Disease Prevention And Health Promotion

Working to Reverse the US Epidemic At A Glance 2016 The rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes in the United States has begun to fall, but the numbers are still very high. More than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes, and 86 million are living with prediabetes, a serious health condition that increases a person’s risk of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working to reverse the US diabetes epidemic by tracking disease trends, focusing on prevention, identifying effective treatments, and improving medical care. Public Health Problem People with diabetes either don’t make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can’t use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). Insulin allows blood sugar (glucose) to enter cells, where it can be used for energy. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin or can’t use it effectively, blood sugar builds up in the blood. High blood sugar levels can lead to heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, and type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. The health and economic costs for both are enormous: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2013 (and may be underreported). Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. More than 20% of health care spending is for people with diagnosed diabetes. People who have one or more of the following risk factors should talk to their doctor about getting their blood sugar tested: Being overweight. Being 45 years or older. Having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Being physically active less than 3 times a week. Ever having g Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic

The Diabetes Epidemic

In the 1990s, the prevalence of diabetes took a sharp and unexpected upward turn, according to annual surveys of more than 100,000 participants conducted by scientists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Their study, "Diabetes Trends in the U.S.: 1990-1998," appeared in the September 2000 issue of Diabetes Care . Related Articles 'Poisoning by sugar' and the 'safe for diabetics' foods myth Do 'heart healthy' diets cause diabetes? What is diabetes? The glycemic index: why everyone's talking about it Diabetes is a potentially devastating disease that tends to be taken less seriously than it should because its beginning symptoms may not be alarming. However, its slow progression can lead to recurrent infections and ulcerations, nerve damage, gangrene (which often results in amputations), blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and stroke. Individuals with diabetes have a reduced life expectancy. About 16 million Americans have diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases' latest estimates. As a result of the new research, that figure could increase by several million. Frightening statistics he study found that in eight years, the prevalence of diabetes among adults in the United States rose by 33 percent, from 4.9 percent in 1990 to 6.5 percent in 1998. Among Hispanics, it increased by 38 percent, going from 5.6 percent to 7.7 percent. Among African-Americans, it increased by 26 percent, going from 7.0 percent to 8.9 percent. These numbers are cause for concern. But by far the most worrying are those in the 30 to 39 age group. There, the prevalence increased by 70 percent, from 2.1 percent in 1990 to 3.7 percent in 1998. The youngest age group that the study considered, those 18 to 29, showed on Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Biggest Epidemic In Human History

Diabetes: Biggest Epidemic In Human History

Remember back in history class, when they talked about the Great Diabetes Epidemic of 1665? Of course you don’t; there was never any such thing. Certainly, there have been many epidemics throughout history. These could be enormously destructive; killing millions, toppling empires, depopulating entire landscapes.1 But diabetes as a mass killer? That’s something new. But that is exactly where we are today. Epidemiologists are warning that the Great Diabetes Epidemic is upon us – right now. The result of the combination of obesity and type 2 diabetes (“diabesity”) is likely to be the biggest pandemic in human history.2 Perhaps the word “epidemic” sounds overly dramatic to some ears. But the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) explains that “epidemic” simply refers to an increase in the number of cases of a disease above what is normally expected in a population in a given area. Relatedly, “pandemic” refers to an epidemic that has spread over several countries or continents, usually affecting a large number of people.3 And so CDC refers quite specifically to the diabetes “epidemic” that currently affects almost 30 million Americans, which is forecast to rise to nearly 55 million people over the next decade.4, 5 This chart illustrates the growth in diabetes in the U.S. through the year 2030: Regarding the spread to other countries, the World Health Organization estimates that the number of people with diabetes grew by nearly 300% from 1980 to 2014, to 422 million worldwide.6 That number is also predicted to rise, to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040.7 Altogether, taking into account both the number of people it will affect, and what it will cost to treat, one researcher has gone so far as to predict that type 2 diabetes is on t Continue reading >>

Facing America's Diabetes Epidemic

Facing America's Diabetes Epidemic

Facebook 0 Twitter 0 livefyre Email Print A recent study has linked type 2 diabetes with a higher incidence of breast cancer among women, adding to the already large pile of health problems that have been linked with the chronic disease. The statistics for Type 2 diabetes are staggering. There are more than 20 million Americans with Type 2 diabetes, a high sugar condition caused by poor nutrition, being obese, and a lack of exercisefactors that can all mostly be prevented. About two-thirds of the people with Type 2 diabetes have been diagnosed, which leaves about 6 million people walking around with undiagnosed diabetes. Thats a huge number of people who have a very serious disease and dont know it. And that makes Type 2 diabetes, like hypertension, another silent killer. Unlike Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 diabetes is not a failure of the pancreas, but an inability to produce adequate amounts of insulin for a body that is out of control. On top of that, the insulin that is being produced is not acting the way it should, a situation called insulin resistance that occurs when the insulin can no longer stimulate the cells to process the sugar in the blood. This causes the sugar to build up in the blood, ultimately doing damage to the heart, eyes, and kidneys, and creating small-vessel disease. Type 2 diabetes is now an epidemic, and if not corrected in this generation, it will probably be responsible for most of the strokes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease that we will encounter in our sixties and seventies. Type 2 diabetes is especially common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and certain Asian populations. Most people develop Type 2 diabetes because they are overweight. Basically the human body does two things: it takes in calories, and it burns c Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic Still Has A Disproportionate Impact On Some Americans

The Diabetes Epidemic Still Has A Disproportionate Impact On Some Americans

HuffPost joined The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on World Diabetes Day to discuss the scope of the diabetes epidemic in the United States, including the disproportionate impact on communities of color, among pregnant women and in poor and underserved communities. Please follow along in the video below. Continue reading >>

Combating Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic In America Essay

Combating Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic In America Essay

Combating Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic in America Essay Combating Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic in America Essay In order to combat the epidemic of type 2 diabetes in America, a series of subsidies and social programs promoting and mandating nutrition and exercise for weight loss should be created with the trillion dollar budget. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in America is rising and has doubled over the last 30 years to 23 million (Campbell). Currently, it costs the nation about $90 billion a year to treat the complications of type 2 diabetes (Hoerger). Added with the co-morbidities of type 2 diabetes, namely cardiovascular disease, obesity, and kidney failure, it becomes apparent that drastic measures are needed. In order to combat this epidemic, the U.S. Congress is proposing to use a trillion dollars to do whatever it takes to reduce the show more content The daily food energy intake of Americans has been consistently rising since the early 1970s while the energy expenditure has remained constant. A closer look at the data indicates that calories from fat are the same or even slightly decreased, while the calories from carbohydrates have increased by about 20% (Gaesser). Coincidentally or not, this is also about the same time that high fructose corn syrup was introduced. Between 1970 and 2000 consumption increased from 0.6 to 73.5 lbs per person per year (Bray). Doing the math, this would result in an additional 360 calories a day, though it should be noted that other sugars were decreased over this time so the impact is roughly half of that. At the same time, the energy intake increased from 3200kcal/day to 3900 kcal/day (Gaesser). Taking this a step further is the fact that there is a strong linkage between diabetes and obesity or excess weight gain. Between 60 and 90 Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Today, more than 1.7 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese. A diabetes epidemic is underway. According to an estimate of International Diabetes Federation comparative prevalence of Diabetes during 2007 is 8.0 % and likely to increase to 7.3% by 2025. Number of people with diabetes is 246 million (with 46% of all those affected in the 40–59 age group) and likely to increase to 380 m by 2025. The comparative prevalence of IGT is 7.5% in 2007 and likely to go up to 6.0 by 2025. The number of people with IGT is 308 million in 2007 and likely to be 418 m by 2025. (1) Almost 80% of the total adult diabetics are in developing countries. The regions with the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, where 9.2 % of the adult population is affected, and North America (8.4%). The highest numbers, however, are found in the Western Pacific, where some 67 million people have Diabetes, followed by Europe with 53 million. India leads the global top ten in terms of the highest number of people with diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed by China with 39.8 million. Behind them come USA; Russia; Germany; Japan; Pakistan; Brazil; Mexico and Egypt. Two major concerns are that much of this increase in Diabetes will occur in developing countries and that there is a growing incidence of Type 2 Diabetes at a younger age in Continue reading >>

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

As one of today’s fastest growing health challenges, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in the United States. In fact, the number of Americans diagnosed with diabetes has risen from 10.4 million people in 1998 to 21 million people today, according to the CDC, and the number is expected to rise even more in the near future. The American Diabetes Association projects that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that by 2050, the number of diagnoses will increase by 165 percent. As we recognize American Diabetes Month during November, let’s take a closer look at why more people are developing the disease and what our UnityPoint Clinic providers say we can do to reverse this trend. The Rise of Diabetes in the United States The number of people living with diabetes isn’t just up in the United States, but all over the world. While diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere, the CDC estimates that as many as 29.1 million Americans have diabetes (21 million who are diagnosed and another 8.1 million who are undiagnosed). This means that over 9 percent of the United States population has some form of diabetes. The rise in diabetes incidence across the United States is largely linked to the following three factors: More Americans are becoming overweight or obese and increasingly physically inactive – both known risk factors for diabetes. A person’s chances of developing diabetes increases with age. Now that the baby-boomer population is aging, more people from this generation are being diagnosed with the disease. Type 2 diabetes is especially common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and certain Asian populations, which are all growing populations in the United States. Diabetes Complications Type 2 D Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

It is estimated that almost 8 percent of Americans have some form of diabetes. What's even more worrying is that the number of people with diabetes is on the rise not just in the United States, but all over the world. Scientists have been working to find out why more people are developing diabetes and looking for strategies to help reverse this trend. Diabetes in the United States In the United States, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. In 1980, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with diabetes, compared with 17.9 million today. Diabetes is expected to rise significantly in the near future. It is estimated that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that the number of cases will increase in this country by 165 percent by 2050. Researchers believe that the following factors play a role in the increase: The baby-boomer population is aging, and your chances of developing diabetes increases with age. The Hispanic population is one of the fastest-growing segments of the United States population, and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing diabetes. Americans are becoming increasingly overweight and physically inactive, both known risk factors for diabetes. The Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere. There is evidence that 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. If current trends continue, this number is projected to reach 380 million within the next 20 years. Diabetes affects developed and developing countries alike. In fact, the largest increases in diabetes prevalence in the years to come are projected to take place in developing countries. According to the International Diabetes Federation, India currently has the highest concentration of people with diabetes, Continue reading >>

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