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Diabetes Epidemic 2017

National Diabetes Statistic Report, 2017

National Diabetes Statistic Report, 2017

Diabetes cases are beginning to level off, but the number is still enormous: more than 100 million people in the United States have diabetes or prediabetes. Much work still needs to be done. In July, CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) released the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. The report presents the “state of the disease” in our nation, providing the most recent scientific data on: Diabetes incidence (new cases) Diabetes prevalence (existing cases) Short- and long-term complications Risk factors for complications Prediabetes Mortality (death rate) Costs Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and use of insulin and oral medications to lower blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of additional serious health complications including vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation of toes, feet or legs, and premature death. As many as 2 out of 5 Americans are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Prediabetes is a serious health condition in which a person’s blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough yet to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Without weight loss (for those who need it), healthy eating, and moderate physical activity, many people living with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 analyzes health data through 2015, providing statistics across ages, races, ethnicities, education levels, and regions. This report reflects a point-in-time analysis, and its data provides vital perspective on the current status of diabetes and can help focus prevention and control efforts going forward. Key findings: 30.3 million Americans—nearly 1 in 10—have diabetes. Continue reading >>

China Facing Largest Diabetes Epidemic In The World, Study Says

China Facing Largest Diabetes Epidemic In The World, Study Says

WASHINGTON – China is facing the largest diabetes epidemic in the world with around 11 percent of its population suffering from the metabolic illness, while nearly 36 percent are pre-diabetic, according to a U.S. study. The survey, which included 170,287 participants and was conducted in 2013, was analyzed with the assistance of Linhong Wang from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention and was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Researchers measured levels of fasting plasma glucose of each participant. Those with levels of 126 milligrams per deciliter or higher were defined as diabetic while those with levels between 105 and 126 mg/dl were defined as pre-diabetic. Hyperglycemia is a result of two anomalies — a malfunction of the pancreas which creates insulin, or the resistance of the body to this hormone. Among the diabetic population in China, 36.5 percent were aware of their diagnosis and 32.2 percent were receiving treatment. Among those being treated, 49.2 percent had adequate glycemic control. Tibetan and Muslim Chinese had significantly lower prevalence of diabetes compared to the majority Han population (14.7 percent for Han, 4.3 percent for Tibetan, and 10.6 percent for Muslim). The adult diabetic rate in China of 10.9 percent is close to that of the United States of 9.3 percent according to 2014 figures recorded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Chinese pre-diabetic rate of 35.7 percent was also close to the U.S. rate of 37 percent recorded in 2014. With approximately 1.09 billion adults in China, some 388.1 million were projected to be pre-diabetic (200.4 million men and 187.7 million women). Diabetes is a growing public health problem throughout the world. Some 422 million adults around Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Demystifying The Global Epidemic.

Type 2 Diabetes: Demystifying The Global Epidemic.

Abstract Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has attained the status of a global pandemic, spreading from affluent industrialized nations to the emerging economies of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. There is significant global variation in susceptibility to T2D, with Pacific Islanders, Asian Indians, and Native Americans being considerably more prone to develop the disorder. Although genetic factors may play a part, the rapidity with which diabetes prevalence has risen among these populations reflects the far-ranging and rapid socioeconomic changes to which they have been exposed over the past few decades. Traditionally, obesity and its correlate, insulin resistance, have been considered the major mediators of T2D risk; however, recent evidence shows that early loss of β-cell function plays an important role in the pathogenesis of T2D, especially in nonobese individuals such as South Asians. Knowledge of the modifiable risk factors of T2D is important, as it forms the basis for designing cost-effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to slow the epidemic in populations at increased risk. Lessons learned from randomized prevention trials need to be implemented with appropriate cultural adaptations, accompanied by empowerment of the community, if the diabetes epidemic is to be slowed or halted. Continue reading >>

India’s Diabetes Epidemic Is Making A Worrying Demographic Shift

India’s Diabetes Epidemic Is Making A Worrying Demographic Shift

More than 10% of urban Indians have diabetes, at least half of Indians who have it don't know it, and the prevalence of the disease is increasingly shifting to poorer people, the largest nationally study of the disease in India has found. The Indian Council of Medical Research-India Diabetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study is the largest nationally representative study of diabetes in India and includes data from 57,000 people across 15 states; glucose tolerance tests were performed on participants to diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes. The study was published in the medical journal Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology late on Wednesday night. Across the 15 states, 7.3% of people had diabetes (the study did not differentiate between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes) and half of them had not previously been diagnosed with the condition. The prevalence of diabetes varied from a low of 4.3% in Bihar to a high of 10% in Punjab and was higher in urban areas (11.2%) than in rural areas (5.2%). It was higher in mainland states than in the northeast. The researchers found that richer states seemed to have a higher prevalence of diabetes. In rural areas of all states, the rates of diabetes were much higher than those identified in previous studies, and diabetes was more prevalent in better-off individuals. However, in the urban areas of some of the more affluent states (Chandigarh, Maharashtra, and Tamil Nadu), diabetes prevalence was higher in poorer people. For example, in urban areas of Chandigarh, the rate of diabetes was 26.9% for among people from low socio-economic background, compared to 12.9% for people from high socio-economic backgrounds. In urban areas of Punjab, the rates were 16.1% and 11.9%, respectively. This, the researchers call "evidence of an epidemiological transition"; "Our study Continue reading >>

Media Touts A New Study Blaming Diabetes Epidemic On Global Warming

Media Touts A New Study Blaming Diabetes Epidemic On Global Warming

The media is touting a new study claiming global warming could be, at least in part, to blame for the “diabetes epidemic” sweeping the globe. “When it gets warmer, there is higher incidence of diabetes,” Lisanne Blauw, a Ph.D. candidate at the Netherlands-based Einthoven Laboratory and the study’s lead author, told The Huffington Post Tuesday. “It’s important to realize global warming has further effects on our health, not only on the climate,” Blauw said. Blauw and her colleagues wrote “the diabetes incidence rate in the USA and prevalence of glucose intolerance worldwide increase with higher outdoor temperature” based on a meta-analysis of 14 years of data on diabetes and temperature in U.S. states. Researchers hypothesize “the global increase in temperature contributes to the current type 2 diabetes epidemic” since warmer weather could inhibit brown adipose tissue (BAT) that turns food into energy for the body. That could reduce the body’s ability to metabolize glucose, making Type 2 diabetes more likely. “Hot weather can be more difficult for people with diabetes,” Mona Sarfaty, director of the Consortium on Climate Change and Health, told Popular Science. “The heat keeps people from being active, which means they expend less calories, which can lead to more weight gain,” Sarfaty said. “Also, people with diabetes often have kidney problems. Dehydration — which comes with heat — can worsen kidney problems when people are dehydrated.” HuffPo, of course, mentioned climate scientists declared 2016 the hottest year on record. “On the basis of our results, a 1°C rise in environmental temperature would account for over 100 000 new diabetes cases per year in the USA alone, given a population of nearly 322 million people in 2015, Continue reading >>

Fighting The Diabetes Epidemic The Way Public Health Has Fought Hiv

Fighting The Diabetes Epidemic The Way Public Health Has Fought Hiv

In the U.S. and other high-income countries, diabetes is a good news, bad news scenario. On one hand, people who have diabetes today fare better than they did 20 years ago. They are living longer and suffering fewer complications, such as heart disease, kidney disease, amputations, strokes, and blindness. SEEBRI NEOHALER should not be initiated in patients with acutely deteriorating or potentially life-threatening episodes of COPD or used as rescue therapy for acute episodes of bronchospasm. Acute symptoms should be treated with an inhaled short-acting beta2-agonist. As with other inhaled medicines, SEEBRI NEOHALER can produce paradoxical bronchospasm that may be life threatening. If paradoxical bronchospasm occurs following dosing with SEEBRI NEOHALER, it should be treated immediately with an inhaled, short-acting bronchodilator; SEEBRI NEOHALER should be discontinued immediately and alternative therapy instituted. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with SEEBRI NEOHALER. If signs occur, discontinue immediately and institute alternative therapy. SEEBRI NEOHALER should be used with caution in patients with severe hypersensitivity to milk proteins. SEEBRI NEOHALER should be used with caution in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma and in patients with urinary retention. Prescribers and patients should be alert for signs and symptoms of acute narrow-angle glaucoma (e.g., eye pain or discomfort, blurred vision, visual halos or colored images in association with red eyes from conjunctival congestion and corneal edema) and of urinary retention (e.g., difficulty passing urine, painful urination), especially in patients with prostatic hyperplasia or bladder-neck obstruction. Patients should be instructed to consult a physician immediately should any of these Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

Mario Alberto Maciel Tinajero looks like a fairly healthy 68-year-old. He has a few extra pounds on his chest but he's relatively fit. Yet he's suffered for the last 20 years from what he calls a "terrible" condition: diabetes. "I've never gotten used to this disease," he says. Maciel runs a stall in the Lagunilla market in downtown Mexico City. This market is famous for its custom-made quinceañera dresses and hand-tailored suits. Diabetes has come to dominate Maciel's life. It claimed the life of his mother. He has to take pills and injections every day to keep it under control. And because of the disease he's supposed to eat a diet heavy in vegetables that he views as inconvenient and bland. "Imagine not being able to eat a carnitas taco!" he says with indignation. His doctors have told him to stop eating the steaming hot street food that's for sale all around the market — tacos, tamales, quesadillas, fat sandwiches called tortas. His eyes light up when talks about the roast pork taquitos and simmering beef barbacoa that he's supposed to stay away from. "A person who has to work 8 or 10 hours has to eat what's at hand, what's available," he says. "It's difficult to follow a diabetic diet. The truth is it's very difficult." Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico, according to the World Health Organization. The disease claims nearly 80,000 lives each year, and forecasters say the health problem is expected to get worse in the decades to come. By contrast, in the U.S. it's the sixth leading cause of death, with heart disease and cancer claiming 10 times more Americans each year than diabetes. Rising rates of obesity combined with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes has caused a slow steady rise in the condition in Mexico over the last 40 years. Now Continue reading >>

Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes Data And Publications

Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes Data And Publications

The Washington State Diabetes Prevention and Control Program works with other chronic disease programs and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to define the burden of diabetes. This work informs and influences public health decision-making. We monitor several data sources to track diabetes in Washington. We also measure progress on state and national objectives to guide program development. These sources inform this work. Diabetes Epidemic and Action Report The 2017 Washington State Diabetes Epidemic and Action Report (PDF) is a legislative report written in response to Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6052 (June 2015). It is the result of a collaborative effort from the Washington State Department of Health, the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, and the Washington State Health Care Authority. This report is intended to inform the State Legislature about the current state of diabetes in Washington and provide recommendations on how to reduce the impact of the epidemic. Everyone concerned about diabetes in Washington may find this report valuable to inform and guide their priorities and work. This report is an update to the 2014 Washington State Diabetes Epidemic and Action Report (PDF). Data Heart Disease and Stroke Publications Diabetes Publications For more information about program data and publications, contact us at [email protected] at 360-859-3677. Continue reading >>

Rising Global Temperatures Could Be Contributing To Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic

Rising Global Temperatures Could Be Contributing To Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic

Growing global temperatures may be playing a part in the rising numbers of people developing type 2 diabetes, suggests new research from the Leiden University Medical Center and the Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide. In 2015, 415 million adults globally were suffering from diabetes, and expectations are that the prevalence will rise by almost 55%, up to 642 million cases by 2040. In high-income countries, 91% of adults affected by diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, it was recently shown that acclimatization of patients with type 2 diabetes to moderate cold for only 10 days already improves insulin sensitivity. Physiologically, cold exposure activates brown adipose tissue (BAT) that has been identified to combust large amounts of lipids to generate heat. Previously, it has been shown that BAT activity is negatively associated with outdoor temperature. A research team headed by Leiden University Medical Center Professor Patrick Rensen set out to investigate if global increases in temperature were contributing to the current type 2 diabetes growth by negatively impacting on glucose metabolism via a reduction in BAT activity. “In the present study, we aimed to assess the association between outdoor temperature and glucose metabolism on a countrywide as well as a global scale,” Prof. Rensen and co-authors said. “We specifically hypothesized that diabetes incidence and prevalence of glucose intolerance increase with rising outdoor temperatures.” The researchers used data on diabetes incidence amongst adults in 50 US states and three territories (Guam, Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands) for the years 1996 to 2009 from the National Diabetes Surveillance System of the Centers for Dis Continue reading >>

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

DIABETES is a life-long health condition which affects around 3.5 million people in the UK alone. Today is World Diabetes Day, and experts estimate there are up to 549,000 people living with diabetes who don't know it yet. But what is it exactly and what are the difference between the two types? Getty Images What is diabetes? It is a condition caused by high levels of glucose - or sugar - in the blood. Glucose levels are so high because the body is unable to properly use it. In people diagnosed with diabetes, their pancreas doesn't produce any insulin, or not enough insulin. Getty Images Insulin is a hormone typically produced by the pancreas and allows glucose to enter the cells in the body, where it's used for energy. What are the signs to look out for with diabetes? The common signs you may have diabetes include: going to the toilet a lot, especially at night being really thirsty feeling more tired than usual losing weight, without trying to genital itching or thrush cuts and wounds that take longer to heal blurred vision The symptoms are caused by high levels of glucose remaining in the blood, where it cannot be used as energy. These signs are common in children and adults alike. But, adults suffering type 1 diabetes can find it harder to recognise their symptoms. Diabetes UK's four T's campaign aims to raise awareness of the key signs. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but the two different types do this in different ways. The distinction lies in what is causing the lack of insulin - often described as the key, that allows glucose to unlock the door to the cells. With type 1 diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces no insulin, but in type 2 cells in the body become r Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Fighting The Epidemic The Way Public Health Has Fought Hiv

Diabetes: Fighting The Epidemic The Way Public Health Has Fought Hiv

In the U.S. and other high-income countries, diabetes is a good news, bad news scenario. On one hand, people who have diabetes today fare better than they did 20 years ago. They are living longer and suffering fewer complications, such as heart disease, kidney disease, amputations, strokes, and blindness. On the other hand, more people are developing diabetes than experts even projected, with some 29 million people in the U.S. living with the disease today. One in four people with diabetes remains unaware and almost 90 percent with prediabetes don't know their blood sugar is elevated. And the drop in complications is not enjoyed equally. Minorities, people with low incomes, and younger adults tend to suffer more than their white, affluent, and older counterparts. "We have gotten very good at caring for and controlling diabetes, but we are lagging in prevention," says K.M. Venkat Narayan, Ruth and O.C. Hubert Professor of Global Health. "The science is there. We know exercise, a healthy diet, and weight loss are extremely effective in preventing diabetes in people at high risk, but we haven't been able to figure out how to translate and scale up the implementation of that knowledge into population-wide interventions that work. We also need to find ways to improve outcomes for disenfranchised populations." Narayan and his team will be tackling these issues through the newly established Georgia Center for Diabetes Translation Research. The center is funded by a grant from National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases that was awarded to a partnership of Emory University (Rollins as well as the schools of medicine, nursing, and business), Georgia Institute of Technology, and Morehouse School of Medicine. Narayan is the principal investigator of the center Continue reading >>

If Not Us, Who? Curbing The Diabetes Epidemic Requires A Person-centered Approach

If Not Us, Who? Curbing The Diabetes Epidemic Requires A Person-centered Approach

I know from personal experience how challenging it can be to navigate the health care system. My mother was diagnosed with diabetes at an early age, and as the oldest daughter in a large family, it was up to me to coordinate her care that included frequent hospital stays. I often was frustrated with the fragmented system we found ourselves in, particularly as her condition continued to worsen. The experience convinced me that something had to be done. My mother passed away from complications related to her diabetes. She would have been proud knowing I — along with my colleagues — am fighting for innovative solutions to chronic health conditions. As the seventh leading cause of death in the United States,1 and the leading cause of kidney failure, adult blindness and lower-extremity amputations,2 there's no question that diabetes is a serious public health issue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the adult population, live with diabetes. Together, the direct and indirect costs of diabetes and related complications exacted a toll of $245 billion on our nation's economy in 2012, according to the latest five-year study by the American Diabetes Association. The recent upward trend in diabetes cases is also startling. Since the disease first emerged in the 1980s as a major threat to public health, the number of adults with diabetes has nearly quadrupled. Although much can be attributed to significant advances in diabetes research and treatment, equally important is the role health care providers, community organizations, employers and policymakers have played in addressing several underlying causes of diabetes — socioeconomic conditions such as race, income and level of education. We must continue to take Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic Still Has A Disproportionate Impact On Some Americans

The Diabetes Epidemic Still Has A Disproportionate Impact On Some Americans

HuffPost joined The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on World Diabetes Day to discuss the scope of the diabetes epidemic in the United States, including the disproportionate impact on communities of color, among pregnant women and in poor and underserved communities. Please follow along in the video below. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Abstract The “Diabesity” epidemic (obesity and type 2 diabetes) is likely to be the biggest epidemic in human history. Diabetes has been seriously underrated as a global public health issue and the world can no longer ignore “the rise and rise” of type 2 diabetes. Currently, most of the national and global diabetes estimates come from the IDF Atlas. These estimates have significant limitations from a public health perspective. It is apparent that the IDF have consistently underestimated the global burden. More reliable estimates of the future burden of diabetes are urgently needed. To prevent type 2 diabetes, a better understanding of the drivers of the epidemic is needed. While for years, there has been comprehensive attention to the “traditional” risk factors for type 2 diabetes i.e., genes, lifestyle and behavioral change, the spotlight is turning to the impact of the intra-uterine environment and epigenetics on future risk in adult life. It highlights the urgency for discovering novel approaches to prevention focusing on maternal and child health. Diabetes risk through epigenetic changes can be transmitted inter-generationally thus creating a vicious cycle that will continue to feed the diabetes epidemic. History provides important lessons and there are lessons to learn from major catastrophic events such as the Dutch Winter Hunger and Chinese famines. The Chinese famine may have been the trigger for what may be viewed as a diabetes “avalanche” many decades later. The drivers of the epidemic are indeed genes and environment but they are now joined by deleterious early life events. Looking to the future there is the potential scenario of future new “hot spots” for type 2 diabetes in regions e.g., the Horn of Africa, now experiencing droughts and f Continue reading >>

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