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Diabetes Empty Stomach

Today Morning I Did My First Sugar Test On An Empty Stomach Using A Kit And Got A Reading Of 100. Am I Borderline Dieabetic? Or Does 100 Map Onto Sugar Level Of A Normal Non-diabetic Person?

Today Morning I Did My First Sugar Test On An Empty Stomach Using A Kit And Got A Reading Of 100. Am I Borderline Dieabetic? Or Does 100 Map Onto Sugar Level Of A Normal Non-diabetic Person?

Your fasting blood sugar level is fine, you don't have diabetes, not even pre-diabetes (impaired fasting blood sugar), no other tests needed. If you're at high risk of developing diabetes (obese, one of the parents have type 2 diabetes, a woman has had gestational diabetes) repeat at yearly intervals. See the Mayo websit Tests and diagnosis A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. For decades an oral glucose tolerance test haven't been done to diagnose diabetes. Some are using glycated hemoglobine (HbA1c) levels instead of fasting blood sugar to diagnose diabetes An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. HbA1c levels at least in Europe isn't given as a percentage anymore, but to have consistent lab to lab result as mmol/mol, see this conversion chart NGSP HbA1c (%) to IFCC HbA1c (mmol/mol) conversion chart Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Gastroparesis

Diabetes: Gastroparesis

www.CardioSmart.org After you eat, your stomach normally should empty after 1½ to 2 hours. When you have gastroparesis, your stomach takes a lot longer to empty. This can cause belly pain, bloating, belching, hiccups, heartburn, nausea or vomiting, loss of appetite, and other problems. These symptoms may come and go. They most often occur during and after meals. With gastroparesis, you may feel full after only a few bites of food. Home treatment can often help with gastroparesis. Bezoar is a fairly rare condition related to gastroparesis. In this condition, food stays in the stomach for a long time and forms a hard lump. This causes food to get stuck in the stomach. What causes gastroparesis? Gastroparesis occurs when the nerves to the stomach do not work properly. Diabetes is the most common cause of this nerve damage. When you have gastroparesis, food can remain in your stomach for a long time. When food finally enters the intestine and is absorbed, your blood sugar levels rise. When you have gastroparesis, you cannot predict when your stomach will empty. This can make it harder to control your blood sugar levels. Although it can be hard, keeping your blood sugar levels under control may help with your symptoms. With gastroparesis, you may need to take your insulin or medicines after you eat, when your blood sugar starts to rise. This may help you prevent hypoglycemia. What can you do at home? • Eat several small meals each day rather than three large meals. • Eat foods that are low in fiber and fat. • If your doctor suggests it, take medicines that help the stomach emptymore quickly. These are called motility agents. • Carefully monitor your blood sugar. Controlling blood sugar levels may decrease your symptoms. When should you call your do Continue reading >>

What Is The Right Amount Of Sugar In Your Blood On An Empty Stomach?

What Is The Right Amount Of Sugar In Your Blood On An Empty Stomach?

What Is the Right Amount of Sugar in Your Blood on an Empty Stomach? Hard candy can quickly increase your blood sugar if it is too low. Blood sugar tested on an empty stomach, also called fasting blood glucose, can help determine whether you are healthy or have a medical condition like Type 2 diabetes. Different medical conditions can cause your fasting blood sugar to be higher or lower than normal, and certain medications can also affect your blood sugar levels. A fasting blood glucose score of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter often means you have a condition called pre-diabetes, and if your blood sugar level is above 126 milligrams per deciliter it usually means you have diabetes, according to MedlinePlus. However, other conditions can also cause high fasting blood sugar, including pancreatic inflammation or cancer, an overactive thyroid gland or rare conditions like Cushing syndrome or acromegaly, which causes tumors. Medications, including corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, beta blockers and certain types of antidepressants can also increase your blood sugar levels. Some signs of high blood sugar levels including increased thirst and frequent urination. Should your test results show a fasting blood sugar level under 70 milligrams per deciliter, you may an underactive thyroid or a pituitary problem called hypopituitarism. Diabetics may get this type of result if they've taken too much diabetes medication or insulin. Medications like MAOIs, acetaminophen, anabolic steroids and gemfibrozil can also lower your blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar levels can cause symptoms including fatigue, confusion, fast heartbeat, lightheadedness, shakiness and irritability. The correct amount of sugar in your blood on an empty stomach is between 70 milligrams per deciliter and Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

8 Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Dips And Spikes

If you have type 2 diabetes and your blood sugar levels are racing up and down like a roller coaster, it's time to get off the ride. Big swings in your blood sugar can make you feel lousy. But even if you aren't aware of them, they can still increase your risk for a number of serious health problems. By making simple but specific adjustments to your lifestyle and diet, you can gain better blood-sugar control. Your body uses the sugar, also known as glucose, in the foods you eat for energy. Think of it as a fuel that keeps your body moving throughout the day. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Type 2 diabetes decreases the body’s production of insulin, which is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood and can damage nerves and blood vessels. This increase of blood sugar also increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Over time, high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, can lead to more health problems, including kidney failure and blindness. "Keeping blood sugar stable can help prevent the long-term consequences of fluctuations," says Melissa Li-Ng, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Dr. Li-Ng explains that high blood sugar can cause a number of symptoms that include: Fatigue Increased thirst Blurry vision Frequent urination It's also important to know that you can have high blood sugar and still feel fine, but your body can still suffer damage, Li-Ng says. Symptoms of high blood sugar typically develop at levels above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). "You can have high blood sugar that's between 150 and 199 and feel perfectly fine," Li-Ng says. Over time, your body can also get used to chronically high blood sugar levels, so you don’t feel the symptoms, she says. On the flip side, if you Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Over time, diabetes can affect many parts of your body. One of those is the vagus nerve, which controls how quickly your stomach empties. When it's damaged, your digestion slows down and food stays in your body longer than it should. This is a condition called gastroparesis. It can make you feel queasy and vomit. It's also bad for your blood sugar levels. Although it's more common in people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 can also get it. Most people with gastroparesis have had diabetes for at least 10 years and also have other complications related to the disease. You may have: Heartburn or reflux (backup of stomach contents into the esophagus) Vomiting (in severe cases, this may happen daily) Feeling full quickly when eating Food that stays in your stomach too long can spoil and lead to the growth of bacteria. Undigested food can harden and form a lump called a bezoar. It can block your stomach and keep what you eat from moving into the small intestine. Gastroparesis can make it hard to control diabetes. When food finally does leave your stomach and enters the small intestine, your blood sugar goes up, too. Throwing up can also leave you dehydrated. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms. He’ll also do a physical exam, and he may check your blood sugar. He might also suggest other tests. Barium X-ray: You drink a liquid (barium), which coats your esophagus, stomach, and small intestine and shows up on X-rays. This test is also known as an upper GI (gastrointestinal) series or a barium swallow. Barium beefsteak meal: You eat a meal with barium in it, and the doctor uses an X-ray to watch how long it takes you to digest the food. That tells your doctor how quickly your stomach empties. Radioisotope gastric-emptying scan: You eat food that has a radioactive Continue reading >>

7 Home Remedies To Manage Diabetes

7 Home Remedies To Manage Diabetes

Much thanks to our changing, unhealthy lifestyle, stress and lack of physical or mental exercise, world is now engulfed by a widespread disease known as diabetes like never before. This phenomenon is also observed to slowly deteriorate the overall health of a person, reducing his/ her life span. Diabetes is a genetic as well as a lifestyle disease in which the blood sugar level is too high in a human body. Since it is a chronic disease and once affected, patients are usually on anti-diabetic medicines for life. Even though it is very difficult to completely stop taking the medication completely, here are some natural and Ayurvedic home remedies to help you keep your sugar levels in control naturally. But, do consult your Ayurveda physician before starting on any remedies listed below to avoid complications. POWERFUL NATURAL HOME REMEDY TO MANAGE DIABETES 1. BITTER GOURD OR KARELA Rich in plant insulin-polypeptide-P, bitter gourd or karela have the ability to reduce the hyperglycemia (increase in sugar levels). Bitter gourd also contains two very essential compounds called charatin and momordicin, which are the key compounds in lowering one’s blood sugar levels. How to use: Consume karela once a week wither as a subzi or in a curry. Slice the bitter gourd and scrape away the flesh to remove the seeds. Add the sliced vegetable to a blender and run till it becomes juice. Drink one small glass of this juice on empty stomach every morning. 2. FENUGREEK Fenugreek is a commonly used herb in Indian kitchen with great many benefits. It is helps to control diabetes, improve glucose tolerance, lower blood sugar levels and stimulate the secretion of glucose-dependent insulin. How to use: Soak 2 tbsp of fenugreek seeds in water overnight and drink that water along with the seeds i Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

For many people, a glass of alcohol here and there does not pose a problem. However, for those with health conditions, such as diabetes, alcohol can affect blood sugar levels and pose a health risk. Understanding what you are consuming and how alcohol influences blood glucose levels is particularly important for people with diabetes. Alcohol can interfere with blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should sip drinks slowly and not drink on an empty stomach. Alcohol and the body Alcohol is a depressant; it is classed as a "sedative-hypnotic drug" because it depresses the central nervous system. Every organ in the body can be affected by alcohol. Once consumed, it is rapidly absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and enters the bloodstream. In an average person, the liver can breaks down roughly one standard drink of alcohol per hour. Excess alcohol moves throughout the body. The amount not broken down by the liver is removed by the lungs,kidneys, and skin in urine and sweat. How alcohol affects a person's body depends on how much they consume. At low doses, alcohol can act as a stimulant - people may feel happy, or become talkative. Drinking too much alcohol, however, can impair the body. Alcohol and blood sugar levels A person's overall health plays a big role in how they respond to alcohol. People with diabetes or other blood sugar problems must be careful when consuming alcohol. Alcohol consumption can interfere with blood sugar as well as the hormones needed to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Frequent heavy drinkers can wipe out their energy storage in a few hours. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can reduce the overall effectiveness of insulin. This results in high blood sugar levels. Many people with alcoholic liver disease also have either gluc Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Symptoms, Complications, And Treatment

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Symptoms, Complications, And Treatment

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Symptoms, Complications, and Treatment Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Symptoms, Complications, and Treatment You can click on any of the links above to navigate to the section of your interest. Diabetes type 2 is the most common form of diabetes mellitus in the world. Insulin resistance by the body is the regularly observed cause of diabetes type 2. However, there is also another uncommon factor which causes diabetes type 2, that is, the body simply does not produce enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows your body to use glucose (a type of sugar found in many carbohydrates) for energy. Insulin also helps to balance your blood glucose or blood sugar levels, by preventing it from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Following are the normal and diabetic blood sugar levels: Please Note: If your glucose levels are below 50 mg/dL or above 200 mg/dL you need to be admitted to the emergency room without delay. The primary cause of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is that the pancreas may produce enough insulin to transport sugar into the cells, however, the body refuses to use the insulin. Insulin helps to unlock the cells of the body to allow the sugar (glucose) to enter them so that the glucose is transformed into energy. If there is more sugar in the body than is required, the insulin helps to store the sugar in the liver and releases it when the blood sugar level is low, or when the body needs more sugar, such as in between meals or during vigorous physical activity. Therefore, insulin helps to balance out the blood sugar level and keep it in a normal range. As blood sugar level increases, the pancreas secrete more insulin. In diabetes type 2 since the body refuses to use the insulin produced, the insu Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

Out of the estimated 24 million people with diabetes, one third, or eight million, dont know they have the disease. According to Martin J. Abrahamson, M.D., Medical Director and Senior Vice President at Joslin Diabetes Center, this is because people with type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms. However, a simple blood test is all you need to find out if you are one the millions with untreated diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that everyone aged 45 and over should be tested for diabetes, and if the results are normal, re-tested every three years. Testing should be conducted at earlier ages and carried out more frequently in individuals who have any of the following diabetesrisk factors: You have a parent or sibling with diabetes You are a member of a high-risk ethnic population (African American, Hispanic American, Native American, Asian American or Pacific Islander) You had gestational diabetes or a baby weighing over 9 pounds Your HDL cholesterol levels are 35 mg/dl or less, and/or your triglyceride level is 250 mg/dl or above On previous testing, had impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting tolerance Fasting Plasma Glucose This blood test is taken in the morning, on an empty stomach. A level of 126 mg/dl or above, on more than one occasion, indicates diabetes. Casual or Random Glucose - This blood test can be taken anytime during the day, without fasting. A glucose level of 200 mg/dl and above may suggest diabetes. If any of these test results occurs, testing should be repeated on a different day to confirm the diagnosis. If a casual plasma glucose equal to 200 mg/dl or above is detected, the confirming test used should be a fasting plasma glucose or an oral glucose tolerance test. Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Nausea comes in many forms. Sometimes it can be mild and short-lived. Other times, it can be severe and last for a long time. For people with diabetes, nausea is a common complaint. It can even be a sign of a life-threatening condition that requires swift medical attention. 5 common causes of nausea Factors related to your diabetes may cause you to feel nausea. Medication Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the more common medications used to treat diabetes. Nausea is a potential side effect for people taking this medication. Taking metformin on an empty stomach may make nausea worse. Injectable medications used to treat diabetes, such as exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), and pramlintide (Symlin), may also cause nausea. The nausea may go away after extended use. Your doctor may also start you on a lower dosage to try to reduce or eliminate nausea. Hypo- and hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels) or hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels that are too low) may cause nausea. Check your blood sugar and respond appropriately if you suspect abnormal blood sugar levels. To avoid hypo- and hyperglycemia, stick to your diabetes meal plan, monitor your blood sugar, and take your medication as prescribed. You should also avoid exercising in extreme temperatures and keep cool by drinking cold liquids during outside activities, advises Sheri Colberg, PhD, author, exercise physiologist, and expert on diabetes management. Diabetic ketoacidosis Severe nausea may be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous medical condition that must be treated to avoid coma or even death. Symptoms include: nausea excessive thirst frequent urination abdominal pain weakness or fatigue shortness of breath confusion fruity-scented breath If you suspect diabetic ketoacidosis, Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Does An Empty Stomach Raises Blood Sugar? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Does An Empty Stomach Raises Blood Sugar? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 Does an empty stomach raises blood sugar? I am a type 2diabetic who take metformin n glimepride 1mg in morning n metformin 1gm in evening..breakfast by8.30am n lunch 1.00pm.inbetween these meals i don hav anything..so the stomach is empty till afternoon.does it raise blood glucose? I walk for 30-40 min daily..fasting blood sugar is 245 n post lunch is 323.. It does for me, especialy if I am out walking. I find a small handful of peanuts about mid morning will lower it though. Even if you are finding it does those numbers are far too high to be doing you any good. How long have you been diagnosed and what are you doing to lower it. By the way the drugs will not do as much as you can do with a change of diet. I will tag @daisy1 to give you the welcome information in case you haven't seen it Hello and welcome to the forum. Here is the information we give to new members which should help you to get better control of your levels. Ask questions and someone will be able to help. It is important to limit the carbs in your diet. BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist. A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. Its far from the end of the world though and on this forum youll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this. On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

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