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What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

No matter the season, Mother Nature can wreak havoc in our lives. Other emergencies can turn our world upside down. For those people with type 1 diabetes, always being prepared is essential. Below is a list of things that should be in your diabetes emergency kit. Excerpted from Kids First, Diabetes Second by Leighann Calentineand published by Spry Publishing; available wherever books are sold. Diabetes Preparedness Kit My daughter with type 1 diabetes, Quinn, learned about “preparedness” at school and had the idea to make a diabetes preparedness kit at home. Every part of the country has some type of severe weather, and you need to be prepared in case you have to take shelter or leave the house quickly. I’m not sure why I hadn’t thought of this before. In the past when we heard tornado sirens, I swooped up some supplies and ran downstairs. Now we have a kit stocked with everything we might need (except insulin), and I keep it in the pantry where we take cover. We store insulin in the refrigerator because it needs to be kept cool, but we can quickly grab it if needed. Keep your kit in a designated spot so that it can be grabbed quickly, and don’t forget to rotate any supplies that might expire. The plastic container we purchased has two interlocking tiers. The diabetes supplies are in the top tier, and bottled water and snacks are in the bottom. We also take the kit with us when we travel or go camping, or when Quinn has a sleepover at her grandparents’ house. Diabetes Preparedness Kit (Tailor to the supplies that you use.) Plastic container, ideally with a handle so that it’s portable Blood glucose meter Blood glucose test strips Blood ketone meter and blood ketone strips OR urine ketone strips Lancing device Lancets Alcohol swabs Syringes (for both MDI an Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In School: Recommendations For Policy And Practice

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In School: Recommendations For Policy And Practice

Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice Sarah E Lawrence, MD, Elizabeth A Cummings, MD, [...], and Daniel L Metzger, MD Diabetes requiring insulin is increasingly common and likely to impact students in most, if not all, schools. Diabetes and its complications have major personal, social and economic impact, and improved diabetes control reduces the risk of both short- and long-term complications. Evidence shows that more intensive management of diabetes through frequent blood glucose monitoring, insulin administration with injections and/or insulin pumps, and careful attention to diet and exercise leads to better control. Since children spend 30 to 35 hours per week at school, effectively managing their diabetes while there is integral to their short- and long-term health. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group recommend that minimum standards for supervision and care be established across Canada to support children and youth with type 1 diabetes in schools. These recommendations are derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, with input from diabetes care providers from across Canada, and are consistent with the Canadian Diabetes Associations Guidelines for the Care of Students Living with Diabetes at School. Keywords: E Continue reading >>

Care Of Children With Diabetes In The School And Day Care Setting

Care Of Children With Diabetes In The School And Day Care Setting

Federal laws that protect children with diabetes include Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1991 (originally the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975), and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Under these laws, diabetes has been considered to be a disability, and it is illegal for schools and/or day care centers to discriminate against children with disabilities. In addition, any school that receives federal funding or any facility considered open to the public must reasonably accommodate the special needs of children with diabetes. Indeed, federal law requires an individualized assessment of any child with diabetes. The required accommodations should be provided within the child’s usual school setting with as little disruption to the school’s and the child’s routine as possible and allowing the child full participation in all school activities. Despite these protections, children in the school and day care setting still face discrimination. For example, some day care centers may refuse admission to children with diabetes, and children in the classroom may not be provided the assistance necessary to monitor blood glucose and may be prohibited from eating needed snacks. The American Diabetes Association works to ensure the safe and fair treatment of children with diabetes in the school and day care setting (13–15). Diabetes care in schools Appropriate diabetes care in the school and day care setting is necessary for the child’s immediate safety, long-term well being, and optimal academic performance. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed a significant link between blood glucose control and the later development of diabetes complications, with improved glycemic control dec Continue reading >>

School - Typeonenation

School - Typeonenation

Back to School season can be an overwhelming time for students living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their parents and caregivers. It requires paperwork, special planning and many conversations with teachers, school nurses and other students about T1D and how its managed at school. The good news is that with JDRFs help, you dont have to feel overwhelmed. Looking for resources and lively community discussions to help you start the school year confident that T1D wont stand in the way? JDRF has it all. Check out the links below to get information and join conversations about going Back to School with T1D. Request the JDRF School Advisory Toolkit andfind information for parents and educators to developstrong partnershipsto give every child the best possible school experience. Join the conversation at TypeOneNation.org . Exchange information, advice and support on JDRFs online resource community. Educate your classmates! JDRF videos and resources and the JDRF Kids Walk to Cure Diabetes program are fun and educational ways for familiesto explain the basics of T1D. Ready to do more? Hold a JDRF Kids Walk at your school. Create a school plan tailored for your needs as a newly diagnosed student with T1D! See more information below. In the United States, schools that receive federal funds are mandated by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to deliver free appropriate education to children with disabilities, including T1D. A 504 Plan is a legal (written) document specifying what reasonable modifications and accommodations the school must provide for a student with a disability (generally put into place for a student with a medical disability such as diabetes). Children with T1D are protected under this law. 504 Plans are a way for you to hold the school accountable for Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For Taking Type 1 Diabetes Back To School

Top 10 Tips For Taking Type 1 Diabetes Back To School

The start of the school year is just around the corner and it is critical to have as much information as possible to support those impacted with type 1 diabetes (T1D) returning to the classroom. It requires paperwork, special planning and many conversations with teachers, school nurses and other students about T1D and how it’s managed at school. JDRF has put together helpful materials and information to ease this transition; they can be found at typeonenation.org/BacktoSchool, and includes information about 504 Plans, building a School Diabetes Emergency kit, the JDRF School Advisory Toolkit and more. Additional materials can be found in the JDRF Back to School Resource Library. Here are 10 tips for taking T1D to school: 1. Contact your endocrinology care team: Make sure the endocrinology team has filled out the required paperwork (DMMP- diabetes medical management plan and letter of type 1 diabetes diagnosis) – this will ensure the school qualifies the student for additional accommodations to be put into a 504 plan or added into the IEP. 2. Set up a meeting with school personnel: Contact the school before end of year or the beginning of August to discuss your child’s medical needs, and ask for a meeting to be attended by all the teachers, school aides, and bus drivers. This is also a good time to talk about specific needs such as the food served in the lunchroom, when recess will take place (ideally after lunch) and field trips; and include who is going to do the education on training everyone on the fundamentals of T1D. 3. Create a 504 Plan: In addition to the DMMP, you should ask for a 504 plan to be developed. This is essentially a very detailed plan of how your child’s diabetes will be managed while at school, the “who, what, and where” of accommodating Continue reading >>

Mom Creates Diabetes Box For Back To School - How To Make A Low Box

Mom Creates Diabetes Box For Back To School - How To Make A Low Box

Back-to-school prep usually entails new school supplies and a first day outfit, but for some children a little more preparation is needed to make sure that they are safe and healthy when the new year rolls around. Example: Leah Rowe, a fifth graded with Type 1 diabetes. Leah's mom Lauren is getting some serious recognition for a picture she posted to Facebook of Leah's "diabetes box," or a "low box" as it is sometimes called, that includes everything her daughter needs if her blood sugar goes out of whack during the school day. "I put one in every classroom she goes to. It's great for substitutes," the Florida mom explains in a Facebook post that has since been shared over 39,000 times. "It has glucose tabs and snacks for high and low blood sugar. And the Nurse's Box with the Glucagon pen is clearly marked." The front of the kit also features a clear picture of Leah along with explicit instructions of what she need through out the day along with signs of both high and low blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association suggests that parents meet with their child's medical provider and then their teachers and school nurses to determine any diabetes regimen as well as a plan for emergencies. They also recommend providing instructions for all of the adults who will be responsible for your child throughout the day, including bus drivers, coaches and other teachers in the school, and sending your child to school along with a "low box." According to Beyond Type 1 , each kit should have: Concise instructions for how to test and treat low blood sugar Instructions for when to call for extra help Extra vial of test strips and batteries for meters and pumps as needed As well as making sure to give your child's nurses office: Infusion sets and supplies for insertion, like alcohol p Continue reading >>

Emergency Lockdown Preparation

Emergency Lockdown Preparation

As parents, you know that diabetes management is 24/7. The safety and health of your child at school depends on access to care, diabetes supplies and equipment. While no one wants the need for a school emergency plan to ever be put into action, it is important to work with your child's school to develop a plan for how your child's diabetes needs will be managed in the rare, horrific event of a school emergency or lockdown. Practice emergency drills are becoming the norm in schools. However, in the unlikely event of a lockdown situation where students need to stay in place in the gym, playground, library, classroom or other area of the school, it is important to take a few steps to make sure your child will have access to needed supplies and food. Schools must provide access to care, even in the event of an emergency. While there is no way to perfectly and completely prepare for every situation, proper and practical planning can help to make sure your child is safe as possible. Do your homework. Find out if your child's school or school district has a policy for lock-down and emergency evacuations and what provisions have been included for addressing the needs of students with chronic illness. Knowing this policy will enable you to better prepare for a practice drill or a real-life emergency situation. Where are your child's supplies kept so that your child will always have access? Will your child need to stay in place or will all the children be sent to a central location? What happens if your child is enroute to the restroom, the clinic or in another area away from diabetes supplies? Identification. It is important that your child wear medical jewelry or some other item so that first responders and emergency workers can identify your child as having diabetes. Having v Continue reading >>

"superstar" Schools Set The Bar For Diabetes Care

"Superstar" Schools Set the Bar for Diabetes Care Jordon Lebsock (right), 9, with his brother, Trey, 7, and their dogs, Daisy and Buster. Buster (foreground) is a diabetes service dog. When Cheryl Lebsock's son Jordon began first grade at Stargate Elementary in Denver, she met with school staff to set up a diabetes care plan. At the time, no one at Stargate kept glucagon on hand to treat severely low blood glucose, teachers and other personnel weren't trained in diabetes care, and just correcting a low could mean leaving class for a visit to the school health clinic. Jordon struggled with frequent blood glucose fluctuations and regularly missed substantial chunks of class time. Today, Stargate Elementary is recognized as an American Diabetes Association Safe at School Superstar, a school that provides exemplary care for students with diabetes. It is one of seven schools to receive the award for 20092010, the program's pilot academic year. Stargate now has several teachers and other staff members trained to help kids with diabetes. That means that no matter where the school nurse is on a given day, someone else with training is available, even on field trips. And Stargate permits Jordon, now 9, to stay in class when he checks his blood glucose. When Allison Episkopos, RN, became the school nurse at Stargate five years ago, Jordon was the first student with diabetes in her care. Under her leadership, the school adopted new policies for handling kids with diabetes. Staffers were trained in how to inject glucagon in accordance with federal law (which requires schools to provide health services to students with disabilities that are necessary for them to attend school safely) and as expressly provided for in Colorado Board of Nursing regulations. Episkopos crafted a plan th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prep For School Emergencies

Diabetes Prep For School Emergencies

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Another school year is quickly approaching, and its time to start putting plans in place for diabetes maintenance at school. This year, my focus is just a bit different. Well stick with the same procedures that have worked so well for the last couple of years, but my goal is to add some extra precautions in case of an extreme emergency. It seems like every time I turn around, I hear about some major emergency or tragedy that has happened somewhere in the country. Sometimes I feel like I dont even want to let my precious kids out of my sight, even though I know that these incidents are rare. While I dont want to dwell on the terrible things that could happen when my kids are at school, I also know that it is a possibility that something bad could happen, and I want to be as prepared as possible. So with that in mind, heres my plan: 1. Have an emergency kit in the classroom. We have always kept a generous amount of all the supplies Kaitlyn would ever need in the school office. We have extra insulin, syringes, testing kits, lancets, batteries, pump supplies, emergency shots, glucose tabs and even a food scale. What we have been lacking all this time is an emergency kit in the classroom. If there were ever a lockdown and Kaitlyn was not able to leave the classroom, she would need some supplies. She knows how to check herself and operate her pump, but that knowledge would not do her any good if she didnt have a kit to test herself with. So I am going to send in an extra testing kit with plenty of test strips, juice and glucose tabs, and an emergency treatment for severely low blood sugar. 2. Meet with the teacher and give detailed instructions. In the past, our instructions to the teacher have been pretty vague, because we have assu Continue reading >>

Preventing And Preparing For Emergencies

Preventing And Preparing For Emergencies

Print Among the many ways to prevent an emergency: Frequent blood checks, Eating meals and snacks on time (or as planned), and Reacting quickly to signs of low blood sugar. It’s also important to be prepared. That means being aware of what emergencies could arise, having the proper plans in place, and knowing what to do. Potential emergency situations There are 3 potential emergency situations to be alert for at school: Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia): All students with type 1 diabetes will have low blood sugar (less than 4 mmol/L) at school, usually at least once or twice a week. Signs of mild low blood sugar include hunger, confusion, shakiness, and weakness/fatigue. It is important to catch low blood sugar early, and to treat it appropriately and immediately. Keep this poster visible in staff rooms and the student’s classroom(s) so that all staff know what to do. Also ensure that a student always has access to a source of fast-acting sugar (such as juice, glucose tablets, candy). See below, Emergency kits. Very low blood sugar: If mild low blood sugar is not treated, it can become severe. Very low blood sugar is an emergency. You must act immediately. Do not leave the student alone. If a student is not responding, unconscious, having a seizure, or uncooperative (unable/unwilling to take food or drink), call 911. If someone at your school has been trained to give glucagon, it can be given according to the protocol, which will be in the student’s Individual Care Plan. Very high blood sugar: All students with type 1 diabetes will have high blood sugar from time to time, and usually it is not a cause for concern at school. A student’s Individual Care Plan will have more details. However, very high blood sugar with ketones needs action. Symptoms of very high blood Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Goodbye, summer. Hello, homework. And guess what—the first assignment isn’t for kids. Parents, make a game plan to ensure all the bases are covered for your child’s diabetes care at school. Getting back into the routine of school takes a little more preparation for kids with diabetes, but it pays off over and over as the weeks and months go by. And since kids spend nearly half their waking hours in school, reliable diabetes care during the school day really matters. Some older students will be comfortable testing their blood sugar, injecting insulin, and adjusting levels if they use an insulin pump. Younger students and those who just found out they have diabetes will need help with everyday diabetes care. In a perfect world, all teachers and other school staff would understand how to manage diabetes so they could support your child as needed. But here in the real world, you’ll want to provide information to the school and work with staff to keep your son or daughter safe and healthy, no matter what the school day brings. Put it in Writing No two kids handle their diabetes exactly the same way. Before the year begins, meet with your child’s health care team to develop a personalized Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP). Then visit the school and review the DMMP with the principal, office secretary, school nurse, nutrition service manager, teachers, and other staff who may have responsibility for your son or daughter during the day and after school. The DMMP explains everything about diabetes management and treatment, including: Target blood sugar range and whether your child needs help checking his or her blood sugar Your child’s specific hypoglycemia (low blood sugar, or “low”) symptoms (see the list on this page) and how to treat hypoglycemia Insuli Continue reading >>

Safe At School: The Abcs Of Back To School With Diabetes

Safe At School: The Abcs Of Back To School With Diabetes

One Drop | Chrome (or other glucometer) & test strips Juice boxes (15 carbs) & snacks (granola bars, crackers) In addition to the supplies listed above, the school nurse should be equipped with: Refrigerated insulin (short + long-acting) & syringes Insulin pump supplies(infusion sets, alcohol pads, etc.) Make sure your child pairs their One Drop | Chrome and One Drop | Mobile appto track their BG. Download the app onyourphone and use their account login to monitor their highs and lows throughout the school day. Work with your doctor to build aDiabetes Medical Management Program(DMMP) that details your childs diabetes management and treatment. This document should be reviewed by any staff who may be responsiblefor your child during or after the school day. According to the CDC , your DMMP should include: Your childs diabetes competency (Do they need help checking theirblood sugar?) Your childs specific hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) symptoms How to treat hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia Meal and snack plans, including for special events The DMMP is specific to your childs daily needs and routines. These things change! Make sure you update your DMMP each year, or when treatment changes.Download a sample DMMPhere. A 504 plan safeguards your child from discrimination on the basis of their diabetes (as stated in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 ) and outlines steps your school will take tokeep your child medically safe. All plans should: Specify services and modifications neededby students with diabetes Require schoolstaff to recognize hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia and respond ina way that follows your childs DMMP Be individualized to the specific needs, abilities, and medical condition of your child You can down a sample 504 Continue reading >>

11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have

11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have

11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have 11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have Be prepared to take care of your health if disaster strikes. Jenilee Matz has a masters degree in public health and worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a health communications specialist. She writes for several health publications including Everyday Health, HealthDay, and Diabetic Connect. Unexpected emergencies are a part of life. Natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, and blizzards can happen almost anywhere. Acts of terrorism also occur and could send your daily routine into turmoil. Then, after the horrible event ends, you'll face another battle . There's a chance you could be stranded in your home without power or away from your home for days, weeks, or even months. If you dont have access to your medication, blood sugar testing supplies , and other necessities, youll face a medical emergency. Its crucial for you to be ready for an emergency . Taking the time to prepare now can save your life in the future. The American Diabetes Association suggests stocking up on enough diabetes supplies to last for at least three days. Store these items in a waterproof, insulated container thats easy to carry. Tell your family and friends where the kit is located in your home in case youre unable to get to it. Its a good idea to stock regular safety itemssuch as flashlights, batteries, and first aid suppliesnear your diabetes care kit. Fill up your kit with the following supplies Insulin and syringes or insulin pump and supplies. Even if you use an insulin pump, keep syringes on hand in case your pump is damaged or malfunctions, so you are still covered in an emergency. Medication including oral diabetes meds and any other prescrip Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Sending any child to school may often cause a parent great anxiety at leaving their little angel in the care of strangers for an extended period of time. This anxiety becomes ten-fold when sending a child with a chronic illness to school. No one can possibly care for our child like we do so how do you keep your child as safe as possible when you arent there? If you live in the USA, you ensure that you have a 504 Plan in place that outlines the quality of care and responsibilities legally required by the school. If you live in Canada the road is not as clear. In Canada, each board has a separate policy. If your board does not have a Diabetes Policy in place, approach them and ask that it be done. With the increased number of children being diagnosed with this disease, it is in their best interest to prepare specific policies relating to the care of students with this disease. Ask to have a say, investigate other policies and try to work out one that is mutually beneficial to all parties. Policy or not, 504 Plan or not, your child must still be educated and it is still the parents responsibility to do as much as they can to prepare the school to care for their child. Contact your school and ask for an in-service with all personnel who will be in contact with your child. Have your CDE or public health nurse attend to ensure that everyone is properly trained and aware of what is involved in having a child with Type 1 diabetes in their school. If your child is on an Insulin pump, you may wish to show the pump or have pictures of it made available so that everyone understands that it is a piece of medical equipment.You may also wish to go over some of the alarms so that staff are aware of what to do even if your child is either too young to understand or not able to communic Continue reading >>

The On-the-go T1d Kit

The On-the-go T1d Kit

The “T1D On-The-Go Kit” is the extra back-up of supplies that you may need if your car breaks down or you’ve forgotten something when you’re on the go — it could be for a sporting event from home, in the car for your work commute, at the studio, gym or any other place you frequent. It is not intended for long duration emergency care that you find in the Natural Disaster Emergency Kit. This kit should go with you when you’re on the move and used in the event that you need something extra. Remember: Use any bag that is easy to identify, secure and has enough space to hold everything. You may consider getting a waterproof or insulated bag. It is a good idea to label your bag with name and medical ID as well as contact details. Consider getting a system like Tile to keep track of your bag and locate it in case it gets lost. Diabetes Travel Essentials The go-to device for testing your blood sugar levels. Insulin The American Diabetes Association recommends packing a 3-day supply. Include short-acting as well as long-acting insulin. When insulin is kept cool at the recommended temperature of 36° F – 46° F, it will last until its expiration date. Unrefrigerated insulin can be stored at a temperature between 59°F-86°F and may be effective up to 28 days. Don’t forget to rotate supplies so that your emergency kit does not contain expired products. A Cooler (Optional) Include 4 reusable ice packs to keep insulin cool. (FRIO makes insulin pouches that cool when submerged in water.) Never use insulin that has been frozen. Syringes and/ or Pen Needles Both deliver insulin; it depends on what’s your instrument of choice. If you are on a pump you should carry emergency needles and insulin vials, or an emergency pen in case of failure. Also, carry extra syringes fo Continue reading >>

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