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Diabetes Effect On Ears

Hearing Loss Is Common In People With Diabetes

Hearing Loss Is Common In People With Diabetes

Hearing Loss Is Common in People with Diabetes Hearing loss is about twice as common in adults with diabetes compared to those who do not have the disease, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "Hearing loss may be an under-recognized complication of diabetes. As diabetes becomes more common, the disease may become a more significant contributor to hearing loss," said senior author Catherine Cowie, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), who suggested that people with diabetes should consider having their hearing tested. "Our study found a strong and consistent link between hearing impairment and diabetes using a number of different outcomes." The researchers discovered the higher rate of hearing loss in those with diabetes after analyzing the results of hearing tests given to a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. The test measured participants ability to hear low, middle, and high frequency sounds in both ears. The link between diabetes and hearing loss was evident across all frequencies, with a stronger association in the high frequency range. Mild or greater hearing impairment of low- or mid-frequency sounds in the worse ear was about 21 percent in 399 adults with diabetes compared to about 9 percent in 4,741 adults without diabetes. For high frequency sounds, mild or greater hearing impairment in the worse ear was 54 percent in those with diabetes compared to 32 percent in those who did not have the disease. Adults with pre-diabetes, whose blood glucose is higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis, had a 30 percent higher rate of hearing loss compared to those with normal blood sugar tested after an overnight fast. The study, publ Continue reading >>

Infection In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Infection In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Infection in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Author: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Diabetes increases susceptibility to various types of infections. The most common sites of infection in diabetic patients are the skin and urinary tract. Malignant otitis externa and rhinocerebral mucormycosis are 2 head-and-neck infections seen almost exclusively in patients with diabetes. Malignant or necrotizing otitis externa principally occurs in diabetic patients older than 35 years and is almost always due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. [ 1 ] Infection starts in the external auditory canal and spreads to adjacent soft tissue, cartilage, and bone. Patients typically present with severe ear pain and otorrhea. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis collectively refers to infections caused by various ubiquitous molds. [ 2 ] Invasive disease occurs in patients with poorly controlled diabetes, especially those with diabetic ketoacidosis. Organisms colonize the nose and paranasal sinuses, spreading to adjacent tissues by invading blood vessels and causing soft tissue necrosis and bony erosion. Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and pyuria, cystitis, and, more important, serious upper urinary tract infection . [ 3 , 4 ] Intrarenal bacterial infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with diabetes who presents with flank or abdominal pain. Pyelonephritis makes control of diabetes more difficult by causing insulin resistance; in addition, nausea may limit the patient's ability to maintain normal hydration. Treatment of pyelonephritis does not differ for patients with diabetes, but a lower threshold for hospital admission is appropriate. Sensory neuropathy, atherosclerotic vascular disease, Continue reading >>

The Ears Have It

The Ears Have It

All About Hearing Loss Many people think that having hearing loss is like listening to a radio set to a low volume — the sound is simply not as loud. Although it is true that certain kinds of hearing loss can make sounds noticeably softer and more difficult to hear, there are in fact different types of hearing loss that can have vastly different effects on how sounds are heard and understood. The different types of hearing loss tend to have different causes, and it appears that having diabetes can contribute to the development of certain types of hearing loss. The mechanics of hearing Hearing is a process in which the ear is only the beginning of the story. The chain of events starts when sound enters the ear canal and causes the eardrum to vibrate. The vibrations set in motion the three tiny bones that form a chain in the middle ear space that connects the eardrum to the cochlea — a hollow structure that is coiled in the shape of a snail’s shell, containing three tubes filled with fluid. The last bone in the middle ear chain is connected to a membrane covering a small opening called the oval window at one end of the cochlea, and the vibrations of this membrane cause waves in the fluids inside the cochlea. This, in turn, causes movement of microscopic structures called hair cells, which are present in one of the tubes in the cochlea. The movement of these tiny hair cells creates an electrical signal that is sent to the hearing nerve, which connects the cochlea to the brain stem. The electrical signal travels up the brain stem and through a system of nerve pathways before arriving at specialized auditory centers of the brain where the message is finally processed. Amazingly, this entire chain of events takes only tiny fractions of a second. (See “A Look Inside th Continue reading >>

How To Keep Diabetes From Affecting Your Hearing

How To Keep Diabetes From Affecting Your Hearing

How to Keep Diabetes From Affecting Your Hearing Hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes as those without the disease. If you are living with diabetes, reduce your risk of diabetes-related hearing loss with these tips. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . About 16 percent of U.S. adults complain of hearing loss, and that number is on the rise, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Among people with diabetes, the NIH reports that hearing-loss rates double. As with many conditions associated with diabetes , tight blood sugar control and a solid diabetic management strategy can help you avoid hearing loss. Steering clear of other hearing loss risk factors, such as smoking and working in loud occupations, can help protect your ears as well. “Everything you do to reduce [diabetic] complications will reduce the risk of hearing loss,” says certified diabetes educator and diabetes care researcher Ann Williams, PhD, RN, CDE, a research associate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Williams points out that diabetes educators and medical management teams have traditionally been more focused on the long-term impact of diabetes on vision, but current data underscores the importance of protecting hearing as well. “You do not want both hearing and vision impaired,” she notes. A study published in the journal of Otology and Neurotology explored the way that diabetes could affect hearing, and found that diabetes is related to hearing loss at all sound registers, suggesting that it can cause profound damage to the inner ear. Your ear is a delicate structure Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes On Hearing And Cochlear Structures

Effects Of Diabetes On Hearing And Cochlear Structures

Volume 8, Issue 2 , December 2013, Pages 82-87 Effects of Diabetes on Hearing and Cochlear Structures Author links open overlay panel LiXipeng1 LiRuiyu2 Open Access funded by PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic systemic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, with various pathogenic mechanisms. From absolute or relative insulin deficiency, patients with DM often demonstrate various levels of metabolic disorders. Major clinical manifestations of DM include metabolic disorders, vascular lesions, circulatory disturbances and neurologic complications. Along with advances in DM research, reports of DM related tinnitus and hearing impairment have increased continuously. Research on DM related auditory system dysfunction has focused on cochlear microcirculation, cellular homeostasis, genetics and aging. Cochlear microcirculation plays an important role in cochlear physiology and its disorders are associated with many inner ear diseases. Ischemia and subsequent reperfusion seen in cochlear microcirculation disorders are important factors in hearing damage. Understanding cochlear microcirculation and structural as well as functional changes in DM patients with hearing loss and their causal factors will help reveal pathogenic mechanisms in diabetic hearing loss and provide new ideas in developing interventions and preventing damages caused by diabetes. Continue reading >>

​keep Your Eyes And Ears On Your Diabetic Health

​keep Your Eyes And Ears On Your Diabetic Health

When people are diagnosed with diabetes, one of their main concerns is keeping their blood sugar at a proper level. While that is certainly an important factor in staying healthy, it is also important to remember that diabetes can affect numerous other facets of a person’s health, including vision and hearing. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases where the body’s pancreas does not produce enough insulin or does not properly respond to the insulin it produces, resulting in high blood sugar levels. This is a serious and chronic condition affecting more than 29 million Americans. How does diabetes affect the eyes? Diabetes can lead to permanent eye damage if left untreated. Patients can develop several eye problems, including diabetic retinopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and double vision. The most common manifestation of diabetes in the eye is development and progression of a cataract, which is cloudiness of the lens in the eye. Diabetic retinopathy is a more serious complication of diabetes, which occurs when blood vessels in the retina change, sometimes causing swelling and leaking fluid in the retina. In more serious cases, the blood vessels can close off, leading to permanent vision loss. Sometimes abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina and can cause bleeding in the eye or even a retinal detachment. People with diabetic retinopathy often don’t notice vision changes in the disease’s early stages, but as it progresses it usually causes vision loss that in many cases can’t be reversed. The longer the duration of diabetes, and the more uncontrolled the blood sugar, the more likely patients will suffer long-term damage. What can diabetes do to your hearing? Diabetes can also cause problems with your ears. Hearing loss is twice as common in Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hearing Loss: How Blood Sugar Impacts The Ears

Diabetes And Hearing Loss: How Blood Sugar Impacts The Ears

Diabetes and Hearing Loss: How Blood Sugar Impacts the Ears Say what? If you find yourself asking people to speak up, your blood sugar may be the cause. While it may not be possible to reverse the loss, correcting it with hearing aids or other devices can keep you socially engaged. Do you frequently ask people to repeat themselves? Do you have trouble hearing in noisy restaurants? Do you think that others are mumbling? All of these may be signs of hearing impairment, a widespread complaint that is twice as common in people with diabetes as it is with those who dont have the disease. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 30 million people in the US have diabetes, and an estimated 34.5 million have some type of hearing loss, with an apparent overlap between the two. In 2008, a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) looked at the association between diabetes and hearing impairment and found that twice the number of people with diabetes had hearing impairment than those without. And among the 84 million adults who have prediabetes, the rate of hearing loss is 30% higher than those with normal blood glucose. While it may appear that there is a connection between diabetes and hearing impairment, it isnt yet understood how and why it occurs. Diabetes may cause hearing loss, which is likely a microvascular (or small blood vessel) disease similar to kidney and eye damage that can occur with diabetes, said Kanif Munir, MD, associate professor of medicine at the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition at the University School of Medicine in New York City. The small blood vessels in the ear may be affected leading to a loss of hearing. It is not completely clear if improving glucose control will help diabetes-related hearing loss, but i Continue reading >>

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (2015) presents the following statistics on its website: About 2 percent of adults aged 45 to 54 have disabling hearing loss. The rate increases to 8.5 percent for adults aged 55 to 64. Nearly 25 percent of those aged 65 to 74 and 50 percent of those who are 75 and older have disabling hearing loss. I am always surprised when patients (some in their 80s or 90s) walk into my office and tell me they never have had a hearing screening or hearing test. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015) estimates that, of the 29.1 million (9.3% of) Americans with diabetes in 2012, 8.1 million were undiagnosed. As hearing health providers, we need to be alert to undiagnosed hearing health problems. We can sometimes also perceive the beginnings of a metabolic problem in the results of a simple pure tone test, the audiogram shaped like a "cookie bite." Hearing loss and diabetes are very common disorders affecting many millions of people worldwide. A major study (Bainbridge, Hoffman, & Cowie, 2008) confirmed a strong relationship between hearing loss and diabetes. Both diabetes and hearing loss are health conditions that can be screened or tested for easily and quickly. Unfortunately, these disorders often remain undetected until the patient has an "incident," forcing the need for an evaluation. In the case of diabetes, the patient may feel unwell and go to the emergency room. With cases of hearing loss, the patient may first notice not being able to understand conversations at social gatherings. My patientI will name him Joewas in his mid-40s. He had not been feeling well for a while, but had difficulty pinpointing just what his medical problems were so that he could get help. He had mood swings. He often Continue reading >>

How Insulin Resistance And Diabetes Cause Tinnitus

How Insulin Resistance And Diabetes Cause Tinnitus

There is a direct link between insulin resistance, diabetes, and tinnitus. Studies have shown that most people with tinnitus have one of these conditions and treating them with diet and exercise can result in a significant reduction in tinnitus symptoms. There is a similar relationship between sugar metabolism disorders and Meniere’s disease. Exploring Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance refers to the condition where there is an elevated level of insulin in the bloodstream. It is also known as hyperinsulinemia. This occurs when insulin becomes inefficient at transferring glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream into the body’s cells. The pancreas then produces additional insulin. Over time, the pancreas cannot keep up with the decreased efficiency of the insulin and the result is clinical diabetes. This is called adult-onset Type II Diabetes. People who develop insulin resistance and Type II Diabetes typically have consumed excessive amounts of carbohydrates (sugars) for many years, which causes stress on the normal insulin/glucose transfer action until resistance develops. Insulin resistance and Type II Diabetes can be controlled through diet and exercise. In fact, insulin resistance can be controlled to the point where diabetes never develops. But how do these conditions cause tinnitus? The inner ear, like the brain, does not have fat reserves or any source of stored energy. It relies entirely on the delivery of oxygen and glucose from the bloodstream. If glucose delivery is interrupted, the cochlea and vestibular systems become dysfunctional. Tinnitus as well as Meniere’s disease can be the result of this condition. We published an earlier (and longer) version of this subject, Sugar Metabolism, Ketones and Tinnitus. A study on Insulin Resistance and Tinnitus A cl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Risk Of Hearing Impairment In Adults: A Meta-analysis

Diabetes And Risk Of Hearing Impairment In Adults: A Meta-analysis

Diabetes and Risk of Hearing Impairment in Adults: A Meta-Analysis Department of Hematology, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (C.H., S.K., K.F., R.H., Y.Y., H.So.), Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, 951-8510 Japan Department of Internal Medicine (C.H., K.F., H.Sh., N.Y.), University of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Medicine, 305-8575 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Department of Hematology, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (C.H., S.K., K.F., R.H., Y.Y., H.So.), Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, 951-8510 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Translational Research Center (S.T.), Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, 606-8507 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Department of Hematology, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (C.H., S.K., K.F., R.H., Y.Y., H.So.), Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, 951-8510 Japan Department of Internal Medicine (C.H., K.F., H.Sh., N.Y.), University of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Medicine, 305-8575 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Department of Hematology, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (C.H., S.K., K.F., R.H., Y.Y., H.So.), Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, 951-8510 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Department of Hematology, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (C.H., S.K., K.F., R.H., Y.Y., H.So.), Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, 951-8510 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Department of Internal Medicine (C.H., K.F., H.Sh., N.Y.), University of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Medicine, 305-8575 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Department of Internal Medicine (C.H., K.F., H.Sh., N.Y.), University of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Medicine, 305-8575 Japan Search for other works by this author on: Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Scienc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hearing Impairment: An Epidemiological Perspective

Diabetes And Hearing Impairment: An Epidemiological Perspective

Diabetes and Hearing Impairment: An Epidemiological Perspective Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by alterations in glucose metabolism, resulting in elevated blood glucose levels. Diabetes is usually classified as being of Type 1 or Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas continues to make insulin, but a cellular impairment in sensitivity to insulin results in raised blood glucose levels. Diabetes affects an estimated 10.7% of the adult U.S. population, about 40% of whom are undiagnosed (Cowie et al., 2009; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2007). People with diabetes commonly experience a variety of serious medical complications. The majority of adults with diabetes experience cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension and high cholesterol, and the risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke or a fatal cardiac event is two to four times higher among adults with diabetes than for those without diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Among Americans, diabetes is also the leading cause of kidney failure. Severe forms of diabetic nerve disease are a major cause of lower extremity amputations. Diabetic autonomic neuropathies can affect cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, bladder, and erectile function. Because diabetes is a systemic disease with accompanying pathology affecting multiple organ systems, it is reasonable to inquire whether the auditory system is among those affected. Early attempts to establish an association between diabetes and hearing impairment were not very convincing. Researchers, using data collected with the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Study, examined pure-tone Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hearing Loss

Diabetes And Hearing Loss

Weve discussed the links between untreated hearing loss and a variety of debilitating medical and emotional conditions, including dementia, depression, and Alzheimers disease. Given the overwhelming evidencewe felt it was important to reveal that untreated hearing loss is more than an inconvenience, but will eventually damage your physical, emotional, and social health, while causing disturbing effects on your relationships with loved ones, family, and friends. This article will discuss the link between diabetes and hearing loss. People with diabetes may have a higher risk of developing hearing problems than those without the disease. This is because sustained high blood glucose levels from uncontrolled diabetes can eventually damage the small blood vessels of the bodyresulting in eye, kidney, and nerve diseases. Since hearing depends on these small blood vessels and nerves, researchers are increasingly convinced that diabetes can cause ear damage and hearing loss. A 2008 study , using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey results, found a higher prevalence of hearing damage among diabetics (21%) than non-diabetics (9%). The degree of hearing loss ranged from mild to moderate, was generally difficult to detect without a hearing test, but inflicted substantial limitations on communicating. The strongest association between diabetes and hearing loss was noted in younger survey respondents (those less than 60 years old). This is important because hearing loss in this age group is uncommon, suggesting a connection between the diabetes and hearing loss. These findings imply that people with diabetes are much more likely to have hearing problems than those without diabetes, and the increased risk of hearing loss for those with diabetes doesnt appear to be related Continue reading >>

Diabetes: A Risk Factor For Hearing Loss

Diabetes: A Risk Factor For Hearing Loss

home Diabetes: A Risk Factor for Hearing Loss There has been a link between diabetes and hearing loss since the 1960s, but no real pinpoint to a possible cause was found until just a few years ago. In 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted a study that showed hearing loss is about twice as common in adults with diabetes than with those who do not have the disease. After testing over 4,700 participants ability to hear a range of frequencies in both ears, there was a strong correlation found between diabetes and hearing loss across all frequencies, especially in the high-frequency range. Of the participants with diabetes, 54 percent reported a hearing loss for high-frequency sounds. Of the participants without diabetes 32 percent reported a hearing loss for high-frequency sounds. So why is it that diabetes affects hearing loss risk? Some researchers suggest that hearing loss in diabetics is due to poor circulation. Elevated blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels thereby reducing blood flow to certain areas and subsequently cause damages to the structures of the inner ear which are highly vascularized and do not have a backup supply of blood flow. Thus, hearing loss could be the result of permanent damages to the blood vessels in the inner ear. The American Diabetes Association theorizes that a person with a higher percentage of glycated hemoglobin, or A1c, possesses a greater risk of developing hearing loss in the future. A recent Japanese study presents evidence that hearing loss may be related to A1c levels. The current global prevalence of diabetes is estimated to be 9 percent among adults and is estimated to affect nearly one third of the worlds population by the year 2050 . Diabetes is becoming an extremely common disease, making it a larger co Continue reading >>

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing loss occurs with age, but could diabetes play a role? If you find yourself or a loved one frequently saying, What did you say? or Speak up! hearing loss might be the culprit. Research has shown that people with diabetes are twice as likely to experience hearing loss as those without diabetes, suggesting that it may be a complication of the disease. While diabetes care includes regular monitoring of health, whether its checking blood glucose or having an annual dilated eye exam, hearing tests are often overlooked, says Marilyn Enock, AuD, CCC-A, a Pittsburgh audiologist. Physicians should refer patients with circulatory problems, no mattertheir age, to an audiologist, she says. I see people who are 85 or 90 years old, and theyve never had a hearing screen. Its important to have a baseline. Although current research has drawn no firm conclusions about any association between diabetes and hearing problems, experts suspect there may be a relationship. Circulatory problems, such as those seen in heart disease , kidney disease , and diabetes, can affect the blood vessels in the ears. Its a very fine area with very fine blood vessels, and as the diabetes interferes with circulation, it interferes with hearing, Enock says. Kathleen Bainbridge, PhD, an epidemiologist at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, says there are some theories about how diabetes may affect hearing. Bainbridge investigated hearing loss in people with diabetes in a 2008 study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and found that people with diabetes are twice as likely to have hearing impairment as people without the disease, and those with prediabetes have a 30 percent higher rate of hearing loss, compared with people with normal blood glucose. While the stu Continue reading >>

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing Loss And Diabetes

Hearing loss is a very common condition that usually develops gradually with age or as a result of repeated exposure to loud noise. There are a number of other factors which can cause loss of hearing, including illness and physical trauma. Some researchers believe the presence of diabetes could contribute to hearing lossor deafness. In fact, hearing loss has been shown to be twice as common in adults with diabetes compared to those without the disease. The terms hearing loss, hearing impairment and deafness refers to apartial or total inability tohear. Cases of impaired hearing are usually categorised by their type, their severity (mild, moderate, severe, or profound deafness are the 4 different levels of hearing loss), and the age of onset (before or after a person can recognise and understand language). In the UK, approximately 1 in 6 people, or 10 million Britons, suffer from apartial or total inability tohear. Hearing loss develops when sound signals are unable to reach the brain. Damage tothe auditory nerve - the sensitive hair cells inside the cochlea (part of the inner ear), which transmit the impulses from the cochlea to the hearing centre in the brain. This is an age-related and permanent form of hearing loss known assensorineural hearing loss. Blockages or build-up of fluid - earwax, ear infections, a perforated ear drum or damage to the hearing bones can all prevent sounds from passing from your outer ear to your inner ear. This is known as conductive hearing impairment, and is often a temporary problem. In somecases, both of these problems can occur and/or combine to cause what is known as mixed hearing loss. Factors that can lead to sensorineural, conductive, or mixed hearing loss, in addition to aging, include: Prolonged exposure to loud noises or sounds Continue reading >>

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