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Diabetes Educator Articles

Diabetes Educators Needed To Respond To Growing Epidemic

Diabetes Educators Needed To Respond To Growing Epidemic

With an estimated 23.6 million Americans with diabetes, the demand for treatments and informed healthcare professionals is climbing. Diabetes patients and the professionals who treat them must stay abreast of a rapidly changing field. Enter the diabetes educator. Of the more than 12,000 professionals who belong to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), more than half are nurses. Nurses with a knack for education and an interest in the ever-evolving field of diabetes are ideal candidates for this specialty. “Next to my family, diabetes education has been the most satisfying, fascinating thing I’ve ever done,” says Ginger Kanzer-Lewis, RN, BC, EdM, CDE, an independent diabetes consultant in New York and Florida. “It allows you to make an impact on other people’s lives. There is no other disease in which patients decide if they will do well. It is phenomenal to watch patients realize that they are in control of their own destiny.” Teaching Diabetes Patients, Educators Alike Although Kanzer-Lewis is now an independent consultant, she started her diabetes education career while working at Catholic Medical Center in New Hampshire. Early in her career, when she was the hospital’s director of education, nurses who had patients diagnosed with diabetes would repeatedly approach her. “They didn’t know what to teach them,” she says. “I did some research and found there was nothing out there for diabetes patient education, so I designed a program for these patients.” Today’s diabetes education programs typically include teaching self-care behaviors, such as healthy eating, being active, monitoring, taking medication, solving problems, healthy coping and reducing risks. Diabetes educators may teach all-day group courses, two half-day courses Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educator Role Boundaries In Australia: A Documentary Analysis

Diabetes Educator Role Boundaries In Australia: A Documentary Analysis

Diabetes educator role boundaries in Australia: a documentary analysis 1 Susan Nancarrow ,1 Sandra Grace ,1 and Alan Borthwick 2 2Centre for Innovation and Leadership in Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, East Lismore, SO17 1BJ England 1School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Military Road, East Lismore, Sydney, 2480 Australia 2Centre for Innovation and Leadership in Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, East Lismore, SO17 1BJ England Olivia King, Email: [email protected] . Received 2017 Feb 8; Accepted 2017 Jun 26. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Diabetes educators provide self-management education for people living with diabetes to promote optimal health and wellbeing. Their national association is the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), established in 1981. In Australia the diabetes educator workforce is a diverse, interdisciplinary entity, with nurses, podiatrists, dietitians and several other health professional groups recognised by ADEA as providers of diabetes education. Historically nurses have filled the diabetes educator role and anecdotally, nurses are perceived to have wider scope of practice when undertaking the diabetes educator role than the other professions eligible to practise d Continue reading >>

Articles

Articles

We launched a new AADE website earlier this month! Have you seen it? If not, take a look: diabeteseducator.org It was designed to reflect what youve told us you need now, and builds upon technology capable of addressing future needs. Youll notice streamlined menus, simpler navigation and an easy way to see whats new. Start exploring the new diabeteseducator.org: Review key Practice resources like the new algorithm and guidance on when to refer to diabetes education, entrepreneurial tools and the Diabetes Prevention Program. Discover Patient Resources which offers a wealth of materials and guidance for people living with diabetes and handy tip sheets for you to provide during your education sessions. Explore the wide variety of Education & Career opportunities we offer through our courses, career network, accreditation and certification and volunteer opportunities. Read the News & Publications area which gives you online access to our two journals, newsletter and our Diabetes Education Blog. Take advantage of the Research section which gives you studies demonstrating the value of diabetes education to share with your employer. Take action through Advocacy and support federal and state legislation that seeks more access to diabetes education. We hope you like the new website as much as we do! In less than a month, AADE15 will be taking over New Orleans for four days, turning it into the mecca for all hings diabetes education. Educators from across the country will come together to learn about the latest developments in the field, share best practices and have a blast catching up with old friends. Are you ready to go? If you havent already done so, register now . Once this is taken care of, make sure you have your travel and hotel stay booked. Then, check out some other g Continue reading >>

The Latest Articles From Aade's Journals

The Latest Articles From Aade's Journals

by e-FYI | Jun 12, 2017 Diabetes educators need to know the latest research in the field and be able to apply it. AADE helps with both. We publish The Diabetes Educator, our peer-reviewed, indexed journal focusing on clinical practice and research, and AADE in Practice, which offers practical tools and strategies for applying that research and best practices. Every month, AADE members receive a copy of one or the other. Here are some of the articles you will find in the May issue of AADE in Practice and June'sThe Diabetes Educator: Do you have research to share or a story to tell? Consider submitting an article. AADE in Practice: Diabetes educators are creative and resourceful. You dig deep to find ways to impact your patients, and we know the results can be miraculous! Share your stories with AADE in Practice so other diabetes educators can benefit from your insight, experiences, tools, joys and solutions. Opportunities range from feature-length articles to short practice pearls. Learn more about submitting an article to AADE in Practice . The Diabetes Educator: A peer-reviewed, indexed journal, The Diabetes Educator publishes original research supporting the science and art of diabetes care and education. Feature articles include Original Research, Meta-analysis, Systematic Reviews, Integrative Reviews (not literature reviews) and Perspectives in Practice. The Tool Chest and Professional Development departments provide a forum for sharing innovative strategies. Learn more about submitting a manuscript to The Diabetes Educator journal . Continue reading >>

Implementation Of A Diabetes Educator Care Model To Reduce Paediatric Admission For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Implementation Of A Diabetes Educator Care Model To Reduce Paediatric Admission For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Implementation of a Diabetes Educator Care Model to Reduce Paediatric Admission for Diabetic Ketoacidosis Paediatric Endocrinology Department, Mafraq Hospital, P.O. Box 2951, Abu Dhabi, UAE Received 3 March 2016; Revised 23 April 2016; Accepted 24 April 2016 Academic Editor: KonstantinosPapatheodorou Copyright 2016 Asma Deeb et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Introduction. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication that can be life-threatening. Management of DKA needs admission in a specialized center and imposes major constraints on hospital resources. Aim. We plan to study the impact of adapting a diabetes-educator care model on reducing the frequency of hospital admission of children and adolescents presenting with DKA. Method. We have proposed a model of care led by diabetes educators for children and adolescents with diabetes. The team consisted of highly trained nurses. The model effectiveness is measured by comparing the rate of hospital admission for DKA over 4-year period to the baseline year prior to implementing the model. Results. There were 158 admissions for DKA over a 5-year period. Number of patients followed up in the outpatient diabetes clinics increased from 37 to 331 patients at the start and the end of the study years. Admission rate showed a downward trend over the five-year period. Percentage of admission for DKA is reduced from 210% to 1.8% ( 0.001). Conclusion. Diabetes educator care model is an effective and a sustainable measure to reduce hospital admission for DKA in children and adolescents. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common but a preventa Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Educator

The Diabetes Educator

The Diabetes Educator is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes papers in the field of Endocrinology . The journal's editor is James Fain, PhD, RN, BC-ADM, FAAN ( University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth ). It has been in publication since 1980 and is currently published by SAGE Publications in association with the American Association of Diabetes Educators . The Diabetes Educator publishes original articles on topics such as patient care and education, clinical practice and clinical research. The multidisciplinary journal takes the view of diabetes education as represented by nurses, dieticians, physicians and other professionals. The Diabetes Educator aims to serve as a reference for the science and practice of diabetes management. The Diabetes Educator is abstracted and indexed in, among other databases: SCOPUS , and the Social Sciences Citation Index . According to the Journal Citation Reports , its 2014 impact factor is 1.792, ranking it 98 out of 128 journals in the category Endocrinology & Metabolism. [1] and ranking it 52 out of 145 journals in the category Public, Environmental, and Occupational Health. [1] Continue reading >>

Novo Settles U.s. Probe Of Kickbacks, Disguised Salespeople

Novo Settles U.s. Probe Of Kickbacks, Disguised Salespeople

Unsealed whistle-blower suit outlines illegal marketing claims Diabetes drugs made up 80 percent of Novo’s 2016 revenue Novo Nordisk A/S has agreed to settle a U.S. probe of its marketing of diabetes drugs that allegedly included disguising salespeople as medical educators and paying kickbacks to persuade doctors to prescribe its medicines. The allegations were disclosed when a whistle-blower lawsuit was unsealed by a judge. The U.S. Justice Department investigation, which began in 2011, focused on claims of illegal marketing of the Danish insulin supplier’s top-selling Victoza diabetes drug and other products, according to Novo’s 2016 annual report. “We’ve reached an agreement in principle to settle certain claims related to this investigation,” Ken Inchausti, a U.S.-based spokesman for Novo, said in an emailed statement Friday. “The process is not finalized, and as such we can’t provide further comment on this matter at this time.” Inchausti said the whistle-blower suit was unsealed Thursday as part of the settlement. Nicole Navas, a DOJ spokeswoman, didn’t immediately return a call and email seeking comment on the Novo accord. The suit was filed by two whistle-blowers who claimed the company violated U.S. law by wrongfully inducing doctors to write prescriptions for Victoza that were covered by federal health-insurance programs. The lawsuit targeted Bagsvaerd, Denmark-based Novo’s key products. Diabetes treatments accounted for almost 80 percent of the company’s 111.78 billion kroner ($16.3 billion) of revenue in 2016. The drug sales have increased more than 75 percent in the past five years, rising to 88.95 billion kroner in 2016 from 50.43 billion in 2011. Since 2006, Novo officials have “engaged in an unlawful marketing and kickback schem Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educators: Your Allies In T1d Management

Diabetes Educators: Your Allies In T1d Management

You probably met with a diabetes educator when you (or your child) were first diagnosed, learning what you needed to know about type 1 diabetes and how to live well with this brand new condition. Your educator may have worked with you to develop a daily diabetes management plan, teaching you about taking insulin and the various tools and techniques available for doing so, as well as providing information on various topics and practical aspects of living with diabetes. Your diabetes educator probably also helped you find answers to a wide array of diabetes-related questions. But did you know that diabetes educators can also support you and help you improve your care in multiple ways, even years after diagnosis? At least annually, people with T1D can benefit from meeting with a diabetes educator to check in, discuss what is new, ask questions, seek guidance about what is or isn’t working in the diabetes management plan and, if needed, gather resources for further knowledge and support. When Diabetes Educators Can HelpDiabetes educators are health care professionals who represent different disciplines including nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, exercise specialists, and several others. They are available to listen, teach, solve problems, make suggestions, offer support and share resources. Diabetes educators can help you navigate your own self-care at the following times: – When new physical or lifestyle changes or issues come up that make diabetes management more challenging, a diabetes educator can provide valuable support and expertise. New schools, puberty, menopause, pregnancy, repeated highs and lows, the onset of complications such as nerve, kidney or eye disease, or even a bout with depression, anxiety, or diabetes distress (burnout) — all are just a few examp Continue reading >>

"diabetes Educator" By Sullivan, Megan - The Science Teacher, July 2006 | Online Research Library: Questia

Education: R.N., B.S. in Nursing, M.B.A., CDE American Association of Diabetes Educators (www.aadenet.org) American Diabetes Association (www.diabetes.org) Nurses, physicians, mental health professionals, podiatrists, optometrists Our bodies need glucose (sugar) for energy. Sugar is transported through the body by way of the blood. Ideally, the pancreas releases the hormone insulin to take sugar from the blood into the cells. But what if the body does not produce or effectively use insulin? Sugar, with nowhere else to go, stays in the blood and cells do not get fuel. As a result, blood sugar levels increase and diabetes is diagnosed. Diabetes can develop at any age and lead to a lot of health problems. But with the help of a diabetes educator -such as Donna Rice-individuals can learn the knowledge, skills, and tools needed to gain control of diabetes and have long, healthy lives. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not make or correctly use insulin. There are three main types of this chronic condition. With Type 1 diabetes, usually diagnosed in children to young adults, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body's cells ignore insulin or the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. Type 2 can develop at any age, and the chances of developing this most common form of diabetes are increased by obesity and inactivity. Some women develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. This type of diabetes typically goes away after childbirth, but increases the chances of that woman developing Type 2 later on in life. If left unmanaged, diabetes can lead to a slew of health problems in the kidneys, eyes, nerves, gums, teeth, and most critically, the heart. This is where diabetes educators come in-we are professionals from various healthc Continue reading >>

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Go to: One in every three Americans currently has or is at risk to develop diabetes mellitus.1 Worldwide, the number of individuals with diabetes is growing at an unprecedented rate and is expected to surpass 550 million by 2030.2 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is actually a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin. The hyperglycemia resulting from the excessive amounts of circulating glucose can be aggravated by exogenous factors, such as food consumption, physical activity, inflammation, medications, and stress. The chronic, progressive nature of diabetes necessitates ongoing medical care; it benefits from timely access to patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications.3 Adequately responding to and managing circulating glucose requires an assortment of elements, including an ongoing assessment of pharmacology, nutritional interventions, and monitoring. Historically, diabetes was depicted as a condition managed by diet, exercise, and medication. Seemingly straightforward, diabetes management has always been challenging. Changes in each of these treatment elements over the past 2 decades have increased the overall complexity of the disease’s management. Nutritional intake remains the foundation of diabetes management. However, the diabetes diet has shifted away from a physician-prescribed, calorie-restricted exchange diet toward an individualized meal plan that takes into account a patient’s cultural background and nutritional likes and dislikes. Exercise, which is still widely recognized as an anchor to diabetes management, is now carefully linked to the patient’s routine so as to maximiz Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association And American Association Of Diabetes Educators Issue 2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

American Diabetes Association And American Association Of Diabetes Educators Issue 2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

American Diabetes Association and American Association of Diabetes Educators Issue 2017 National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Diabetes is a highly complex disease that requires continuous daily care to effectively manage blood glucose levels and to help reduce and avoid deadly and costly complications. Therefore, diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES), is a vital component of care for all people with diabetes, as well as for people who are at risk for developing diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions most recent estimates, 30.3 million people in the U.S. are living with diabetes23.1 million people with diagnosed diabetes and another 7.2 million people who are believed to be living with undiagnosed diabetesand 84 million people are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (Association) and the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) are publishing the 2017 National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (Standards). The detailed recommendations, which are updated regularly, will be published online on July 28, 2017, and in the September 2017 issues of Diabetes Care and The Diabetes Educator. DSMES focuses on the ongoing process of providing patients and caregivers with the knowledge, skills and abilities that are necessary for prediabetes and diabetes self-care. Additionally, DSMES includes activities that assist a person with diabetes in implementing and sustaining the behaviors needed to manage his or her condition on an ongoing basis. The Standards outline and define evidence-based, specific guidelines to help diabetes educators and medical providers establish and sustain patient care models, programs and teams for Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Educator (diabetes Educator)

The Diabetes Educator (diabetes Educator)

Journal description The Diabetes Educator is the official journal of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). It is a peer-reviewed journal intended to serve as a reference source for the science and art of diabetes management. The Diabetes Educator, an ISI-ranked journal, publishes original articles that relate to aspects of patient care and education, clinical practice and/or research, and the multidisciplinary profession of diabetes education as represented by nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, mental health professionals, podiatrists, and exercise physiologists. RG Journal Impact: 1.53 * RG Journal impact history 2017 RG Journal impact Available summer 2018 2015 / 2016 RG Journal impact 1.53 2011 RG Journal impact 3.11 2010 RG Journal impact 2.23 2009 RG Journal impact 1.73 2008 RG Journal impact 1.62 2007 RG Journal impact 1.64 2006 RG Journal impact 1.01 2005 RG Journal impact 0.87 2004 RG Journal impact 0.43 2003 RG Journal impact 0.58 2002 RG Journal impact 0.82 2001 RG Journal impact 0.97 2000 RG Journal impact 0.82 RG Journal impact over time Additional details Cited half-life 7.00 Immediacy index 0.24 Eigenfactor 0.00 Article influence 0.78 Website The Diabetes Educator website Other titles The Diabetes educator ISSN 0145-7217 OCLC 2776215 Material type Periodical Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support In Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The American Association Of Diabetes Educators, And The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support In Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The American Association Of Diabetes Educators, And The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

Diabetes is a chronic disease that requires a person with diabetes to make a multitude of daily self-management decisions and to perform complex care activities. Diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) provides the foundation to help people with diabetes to navigate these decisions and activities and has been shown to improve health outcomes (1–7). Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is the process of facilitating the knowledge, skill, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care. Diabetes self-management support (DSMS) refers to the support that is required for implementing and sustaining coping skills and behaviors needed to self-manage on an ongoing basis. (See further definitions in Table 1.) Although different members of the health care team and community can contribute to this process, it is important for health care providers and their practice settings to have the resources and a systematic referral process to ensure that patients with type 2 diabetes receive both DSME and DSMS in a consistent manner. The initial DSME is typically provided by a health professional, whereas ongoing support can be provided by personnel within a practice and a variety of community-based resources. DSME/S programs are designed to address the patient’s health beliefs, cultural needs, current knowledge, physical limitations, emotional concerns, family support, financial status, medical history, health literacy, numeracy, and other factors that influence each person’s ability to meet the challenges of self-management. It is the position of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that all individuals with diabetes receive DSME/S at diagnosis and as needed thereafter (8). This position statement focuses on the particular needs of individuals with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Use Of Recommended Communication Techniques By Diabetes Educators

Use Of Recommended Communication Techniques By Diabetes Educators

Use of Recommended Communication Techniques by Diabetes Educators Carol J. Howe, PhD, RN, CDE; Danielle Walker, PhD, RN, CNE; Jordan Watts, PhD HLRP: Health Literacy Research and Practice. 2017;1(4):e145-e152 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC) Terms of Use Copy and redistribute the article in any medium or format; Adapt, remix, transform, and build upon the article; Create extracts, abstracts, and other revised versions, adaptations, or derivative works of or from an article (eg, translation); Text or data mine the article Provided that: The use is NOT for commercial purposes, and users give appropriate credit to the author(s), provide a link to the license, indicate if changes were made, and do not represent the author(s) as endorsing any adaptation of the article. Diabetes educators are challenged to teach diabetes self-management to patients, ensuring comprehension. Effectiveness with patients may be dependent on the communication skills of the diabetes educator. This study sought to determine diabetes educators' use of and perceived effectiveness of recommended communication techniques with patients to teach diabetes self-management and to determine differences in communication by educator characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 522 diabetes educators, comprised mostly of nurses, dieticians, and pharmacists, completed the American Medical Association (AMA) Communication Techniques Survey at a national conference. The AMA survey assessed diabetes educators' self-reported use of and perceived effectiveness of 14 communication techniques. Internal consistency for items reporting frequency of communication techniques was = 0.83 and for items reporting perceived effectiveness was = 0.87. Simple language, written patient Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educator, The

Diabetes Educator, The

Editor(s): James Fain, PhD, RN, BC-ADM, FAAN the official journal of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The Diabetes Educator (TDE) is a peer-reviewed journal intended to serve as a reference source for the science and art of diabetes management. TDE publishes original articles that relate to aspects of patient care and education, clinical practice and/or research, and the multidisciplinary profession of diabetes education as represented by nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, mental health professionals, podiatrists, and exercise physiologists. Already subscribed to this product through your institution? Start accessing your content now. Author/Editor: James Fain, PhD, RN, BC-ADM, FAAN *As stated by the 2016 ISI Journal Citation Reports Customers who purchased this product also purchased these products: FSTA Food Science and Technology Abstracts FSTA covers topics relating to every aspect of the food chain including all the major food commodities plus biotechnology, microbiology, food safety, and nutrition. Northern Light Life Sciences Conference Abstracts This grey literature database provides unique access to 2.5 million abstracts and posters from medical and life sciences conferences from across the globe. JBJS Case Connector This cross-referenced online journal compiles symptoms, conditions, and demographic details to empower surgeons to find cases similar to theirs and to mine the database to reveal emerging trends and identify patterns. Diseases of the Colon & Rectum Recognized as the authority in conditions affecting the colon, rectum, and anus this journal includes peer-reviewed original research, reviews, selected abstracts of the literature, and more. Avoiding Common Errors in the Emergency Department Covers 400 errors commonly mad Continue reading >>

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