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Diabetes Dry Mouth At Night

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth At Night | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Dry Mouth At Night | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Since I have been diagnosed 3 weeks ago, I noticed that I now have a dry mouth at night, I keep a cup of water near my bed and I also get up in the middle of the night to pee, it only once in the night and I don't need to pee again. Anything I can do to resolve this ? Thanks Hi, I'm newly diagnosed too so I'm no expert. I suffered from extreme thirst prior to my diagnosis but it seems to be better now. My BG has come down a lot so I'm assuming this is why the symptoms have started to improve. Are your glucose levels still quite high? Perhaps as you stabilise you'll notice an improvement like I did. I'm sure someone with much more knowledge will be along shortly! I hope you get sorted. Hi , i had a terrible dry mouth about a month before i was diagnosed (approx 4 months ago) i also had dry eyes and dry nose it seems to have calmed down a lot since i started low carbing i still have a dry mouth at night but the dry eyes have more or less cleared up i dont have to use the visco tears every night prob only once or twice a week and the nose is ok if i use a bit of vaseline but the mouth i really dont know what to do with i was thinking its because i cant breath through my nose it makes it worse , i do get up once in the night for the loo but have always done it so its not an issue for me , however these are the only symptoms i have ever had ,i dont get the bad thirst or tiredness that a lot of other poeple get, i hope someone posts with advice for the dry mouth I'm terrible right now with dryness and getting up in the night three to four times is making me so depressed. I have been told that thrush in the mouth is quite common and is what causes the drynes Continue reading >>

Dental Health And Dry Mouth

Dental Health And Dry Mouth

We all need saliva to moisten and cleanse our mouths and digest food. Saliva also prevents infection by controlling bacteria and fungi in the mouth. When you don't make enough saliva, your mouth gets dry and uncomfortable. Fortunately, many treatments can help against dry mouth, also called xerostomia. What Causes Dry Mouth? Causes of dry mouth include: Side effect of certain medications . Dry mouth is a common side effect of many prescription and nonprescription drugs, including drugs used to treat depression, anxiety, pain, allergies, and colds (antihistamines and decongestants), obesity, acne, epilepsy, hypertension (diuretics), diarrhea, nausea, psychotic disorders, urinary incontinence, asthma (certain bronchodilators), and Parkinson's disease. Dry mouth can also be a side effect of muscle relaxants and sedatives. Side effect of certain diseases and infections. Dry mouth can be a side effect of medical conditions, including Sjögren's syndrome, HIV/AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, anemia, cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, Parkinson's disease, stroke, and mumps. Side effect of certain medical treatments. Damage to the salivary glands, the glands that make saliva, can reduce the amount of saliva produced. For example, the damage could stem from radiation to the head and neck, and chemotherapy treatments, for cancer. Nerve damage . Dry mouth can be a result of nerve damage to the head and neck area from an injury or surgery. Surgical removal of the salivary glands. Lifestyle. Smoking or chewing tobacco can affect how much saliva you make and aggravate dry mouth. Breathing with your mouth open a lot can also contribute to the problem. What Are the Symptoms of Dry Mouth? Common symptoms include: A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth Frequent thirst S Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth And Diabetes

Dry Mouth And Diabetes

Tweet Dry mouth, clinically known as xerostomia, is the term used to describe a lack of saliva in the mouth. Saliva helps to control levels of bacteria as well as balancing and washing away acid around teeth and gums. Symptoms of dry mouth An obvious symptom of dry mouth is having a lack of moisture in your mouth. Other symptoms of dry mouth include: Irritation at the corners of the mouth Inflammation of the gums (gingivitis) Oral thrush (yeast or fungal infections on the tongue and cheeks, sometimes following a course of antibiotics) Symptoms of oral thrush include white patches in the mouth, redness of the tongue and cracking of the skin at the corner of the lips. Causes of dry mouth People with diabetes are more susceptible to dry mouth and yeast infections such as thrush because of high glucose levels in their blood and saliva. Other causes include dehydration, smoking and some medication. Ways to treat and reduce the effect of dry mouth Keep your blood sugars within the recommended range Brush braces or dentures after each meal – if relevant Keep yourself hydrated and carry water with you Use a non-alcoholic gel or mouthwash Using lip balm is recommended if you have dry or irritated lips (particularly at the corners) Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Dry Mouth And Itchy Skin?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Dry Mouth And Itchy Skin?

There's less moisture for other things when your body is using fluids to make urine. You can get dehydrated, and your mouth may feel dry. Dry skin can make you itchy. Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth Treatment: Tips For Controlling Dry Mouth

Dry Mouth Treatment: Tips For Controlling Dry Mouth

I frequently have a dry mouth. What can I do to relieve this problem? Answers from Thomas J. Salinas, D.D.S. The best way to treat dry mouth — known medically as xerostomia (zeer-o-STOE-me-uh) — depends on what's causing it. You can do some things to relieve dry mouth temporarily. But for the best long-term dry mouth remedy, you need to address its cause. To relieve your dry mouth: Chew sugar-free gum or suck on sugar-free hard candies to stimulate the flow of saliva. For some people, xylitol, which is often found in sugar-free gum or sugar-free candies, may cause diarrhea or cramps if consumed in large amounts. Limit your caffeine intake because caffeine can make your mouth drier. Don't use mouthwashes that contain alcohol because they can be drying. Stop all tobacco use if you smoke or chew tobacco. Sip water regularly. Try over-the-counter saliva substitutes — look for products containing xylitol, such as Mouth Kote or Oasis Moisturizing Mouth Spray, or ones containing carboxymethylcellulose (kahr-bok-see-meth-ul-SEL-u-lohs) or hydroxyethyl cellulose (hi-drok-see-ETH-ul SEL-u-lohs), such as Biotene Oral Balance. Try a mouthwash designed for dry mouth — especially one that contains xylitol, such as Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse or ACT Total Care Dry Mouth Mouthwash, which also offer protection against tooth decay. Avoid using over-the-counter antihistamines and decongestants because they can make your symptoms worse. Breathe through your nose, not your mouth. Add moisture to the air at night with a room humidifier. Saliva is important to maintain the health of your teeth and mouth. If you frequently have a dry mouth, taking these steps to protect your oral health may also help your condition: Avoid sugary or acidic foods and drinks because they increase your ri Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth

Dry Mouth

Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to serious health problems. Symptoms of dry mouth include A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth Trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking A burning feeling in the mouth A dry feeling in the throat Cracked lips A dry, rough tongue Mouth sores An infection in the mouth Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. Causes include some medicines, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and nerve damage. Salivary gland diseases, Sjogren's syndrome, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes can also cause dry mouth. Treatment depends on the cause. Things you can do include sipping water, avoiding drinks with caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol, and chewing sugarless gum or sucking on sugarless hard candy. NIH: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth And Diabetes

Dry Mouth And Diabetes

We often take our teeth for granted, but the mouth is the first part of the digestive process. It’s amazing how what we put into it and what comes out of it can get us in so much trouble. Most of us don’t realize that the health of our mouths affects our diabetes control, and that our diabetes control affects our oral health. We should avoid saying “dental health” and say instead “oral health,” since there is a two-way street between systemic health and oral health. Dry Mouth One of the most common oral health problems for diabetics is dry mouth or altered salivary flow (or xerostomia, if you like medical terms). The teeth and muscles in the mouth, face and jaw chew the food into smaller pieces to facilitate digestion in the stomach and intestine. The saliva has several functions. It prevents infection by controlling bacteria in the mouth. It moistens and cleanses the mouth by neutralizing acids produced by dental plaque, and it washes away the dead skin cells that accumulate on the gums, tongue and cheeks. It helps with the digestion, making it possible to chew, taste and swallow food. Dry mouth occurs when there is not enough saliva (real or perceived) to keep your mouth moist, which is important for health, comfort and for speaking. Diagnosis of dry mouth is difficult due to the subjective nature of this condition. In most cases, dry mouth is due to side effects of medications. There are over 500 prescription and nonprescription medications that have been found to cause dry mouth. Medications that treat high blood pressure or other heart problems are used by many patients to manage complications of diabetes. Other drug groups that cause dry mouth are those used for depression, anxiety and allergies, as well as diuretics, anti-psychotics, muscle relaxants, Continue reading >>

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

Xerostomia is an ominous sounding name for a fairly common condition suffered by approximately 20% of the population, one that most people tend to underestimate, a dry mouth. In essence, having a dry mouth means the body is not producing enough saliva, which helps the mouth stay clean while removing harmful bacteria that can cause cavities and other painful infections in the mouth. Saliva neutralizes the acid in the mouth and is an important part of the digestive process as it provides the moisture needed to chew and swallow food. Dry Mouth Causes There are many causes of dry mouth, such as not drinking enough liquid during the day, smoking, and sleeping with your mouth open, among others. Dry mouth can also be caused by certain types of medication, such ADHD medicine, anti-histamines, antidepressants, sleep medications, and narcotics. When this is the case, the problem tends to disappear once the underlying cause is removed, meaning that a dry mouth is usually nothing more than a temporary problem with an easy fix. However, for individuals suffering from diabetes, having a dry mouth can be more than just a mild annoyance. Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body. A dry mouth is not only a symptom of high blood sugar, but it can also be the cause of it. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection. A dry mouth can also lead to loss of sleep and an altered sense of taste, a condition that presents with a metallic or sour taste in the mouth. Treatments for Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes Because of the harmful effects of having a dry m Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth From Diabetes | Therabreath

Dry Mouth From Diabetes | Therabreath

Individuals suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes are at risk of developing dry mouth symptoms.Abnormal insulin production and/or absorption rates, which occur in diabetes, can cause the salivary glands to not release adequate amounts of saliva. According to experts, diabetes is likely the most frequent metabolic disease with salivary implications, due to the ever increasing numbers of people impacted by the disease. In 2016, there were more than 29 million people in the U.S. with diabetes, and 86 million with pre-diabetes, a serious health condition that increases one's risk of developing type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. Patients with dry mouth symptoms often have difficulty with many aspects of eating and swallowing. Denture wearers with diabetes may develop sores or have problems keeping dentures comfortably in place. In addition to dry mouth, many people with diabetes can experience taste disorders, excessive thirst, or a painful tongue. Although research has shown that dry mouth symptomsare frequent among people with diabetes, most studies have not conclusively demonstrated that these rates are higher than in people without diabetes. This is not an exact science because there are many co-occurring health conditions that are contributing factors to developing dry mouth. Other factors that can cause salivary disorders in people with diabetes include advanced age, head and neck radiotherapy, systemic disorders, and several drugs. The following facts and stats are gathered from recent research. dry mouth symptoms associated with parotid gland enlargement affects nearly 25% of patients suffering from moderate to severe type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The parotid gland is the larger one of the two salivary glands, responsible for releasing saliva into the mout Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes And Dry Mouth

Facts About Diabetes And Dry Mouth

by Carol Wiley Why do diabetes and dry mouth often occur in the same patients? Two of the main causes of dry mouth for people with diabetes are medication side effects and high blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. Other causes, not directly related to diabetes but which can exacerbate the problem, are poor hydration, breathing through your mouth and smoking. Developing diabetic neuropathy can also cause dry mouth. Oral Health Implications of Dry Mouth Your mouth becomes dry when you don't produce enough saliva. In addition to its role in the food digestion process, saliva washes food particles and bacteria off of your teeth and neutralizes acids in your mouth, helping to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Therefore, a lack of saliva increases your risk of cavities and gingivitis, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. This condition can also lead to other problems, including salivary gland infections, mouth sores, yeast infections (oral thrush) and irritation around the corners of the mouth, along with additional issues for patients with dentures. What You Can Do The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and the American Diabetes Association also provide tips on what you can do to treat dry mouth. The first step is prevention. If medication is the problem, talk to your health care provider about options. To prevent high blood sugar from causing dry mouth, regularly monitor your blood glucose levels and keep them under control by eating right, exercising, taking medications as prescribed and following your health care provider's other instructions. Also avoid other contributors to dry mouth, such as smoking and breathing through your mouth. Be sure to drink plenty of water, taking small s Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Dry Mouth And Diabetes

What You Should Know About Dry Mouth And Diabetes

One of the most common symptoms of diabetes is dry mouth, or xerostomia. Dry mouth is a common symptom in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Not everyone with diabetes will experience it, though. You can also have dry mouth if you don’t have diabetes. If you have dry mouth and suspect you might have diabetes, you should talk to your primary care doctor. Dry mouth occurs due to a reduced amount of saliva in your mouth. The symptoms of dry mouth include: a rough, dry tongue a lack of moisture in the mouth frequent pain in the mouth cracked and chapped lips sores in the mouth infections in the oral cavity difficulty with swallowing, talking, or chewing Anyone can get dry mouth, but it’s a common symptom of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The exact reasons are unknown, but high blood sugar levels could cause dry mouth in people with diabetes. Some medications used to treat diabetes can also cause dry mouth. Other causes of dry mouth include: dehydration kidney dialysis breathing through the mouth Read more: Type 2 diabetes and oral health » Dry mouth isn’t well-understood because there hasn’t been much research in the area. One meta-analysis reviewed studies from 1992 to 2013, but the researchers were unable to determine any definitive causes for dry mouth from the study results. You may be able to improve your symptoms of dry mouth at home. Some home remedies include: avoiding food and drinks with a lot of sugar, caffeine, or artificial sweeteners drinking a lot of water flossing after every meal eating high-fiber fruits and vegetables using toothpicks to scrape excess plaque off your teeth using alcohol-free mouthwash chewing gum brushing your teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste sucking on mints that contain xylitol, which freshens the breath You’ll n Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth And Diabetes: Four Tips For Prevention

Dry Mouth And Diabetes: Four Tips For Prevention

by Lindsey Chamberlain Oral health care is important for everyone, but especially so for diabetics. Sufferers are often at higher risk of dental problems, and one common complaint is dry mouth. Thankfully, there are many ways to help fight off this condition, and most of them can be practiced easily every day. According to the American Diabetes Association, dry mouth and diabetes are a common combination because of the medications diabetics take, and thanks to heightened blood sugar. Saliva serves as the mouth's natural defense against cavity-causing bacteria and acid by washing away food particles and regulating the mouth's pH levels. With a dry mouth, these bacteria and acids remain, increasing your risk of cavities. Here are four tips to help diabetics (and everyone else!) prevent dry mouth. Water and Sugarless Products One easy, diabetic-friendly way to keep your mouth moist and increase your level of comfort is to drink plenty of water throughout the day. The water will help rinse away food particles, keep your mouth at a healthier pH level and keep you hydrated. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research also recommends sugar-free gum or candies to help alleviate the effects of dry mouth. Humidifier According to the American Academy of Oral Medicine, the ambient air of modern homes can contribute to the feeling of dry mouth. It suggests adding moisture to the air using a humidifier, especially during the night. When using a humidifier, keep it clean by washing the inside often, and changing its water daily. The Mayo Clinic says that, if you use a humidifier for health reasons, you may also want to use distilled water to fill it. Distilled or demineralized water is recommended over tap water, which has minerals that can lead to bacterial growth and Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth

Dry Mouth

Print Overview Dry mouth, or xerostomia (zeer-o-STOE-me-uh), refers to a condition in which the salivary glands in your mouth don't make enough saliva to keep your mouth wet. Dry mouth is often due to the side effect of certain medications or aging issues or as a result of radiation therapy for cancer. Less often, dry mouth may be caused by a condition that directly affects the salivary glands. Saliva helps prevent tooth decay by neutralizing acids produced by bacteria, limiting bacterial growth and washing away food particles. Saliva also enhances your ability to taste and makes it easier to chew and swallow. In addition, enzymes in saliva aid in digestion. Decreased saliva and dry mouth can range from being merely a nuisance to something that has a major impact on your general health and the health of your teeth and gums, as well as your appetite and enjoyment of food. Treatment for dry mouth depends on the cause. Symptoms If you're not producing enough saliva, you may notice these signs and symptoms all or most of the time: Dryness or a feeling of stickiness in your mouth Saliva that seems thick and stringy Bad breath Difficulty chewing, speaking and swallowing Dry or sore throat and hoarseness Dry or grooved tongue A changed sense of taste Problems wearing dentures In addition, dry mouth may result in lipstick sticking to the teeth. When to see a doctor If you've noticed persistent dry mouth signs and symptoms, make an appointment with your doctor. Causes Dry mouth is caused when the salivary glands in the mouth don't make enough saliva to keep your mouth wet. These glands may not work properly as the result of: Medications. Hundreds of medications, including many over-the-counter drugs, produce dry mouth as a side effect. Among the more likely types to cause proble Continue reading >>

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