diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Drugs In Development 2017

Designing Better Drugs To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Designing Better Drugs To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Designing better drugs to treat type 2 diabetes May 18, 2017 by Robyn Mills, University of Adelaide Research led by the University of Adelaide is paving the way for safer and more effective drugs to treat type 2 diabetes, reducing side effects and the need for insulin injections. Two studies, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and BBA-General Subjects, have shown for the first time how new potential anti-diabetic drugs interact with their target in the body at the molecular level. These new potential drugs have a completely different action than the most commonly prescribed anti-diabetic, Metformin, which acts on the liver to reduce glucose production, and are potentially more efficient at reducing blood sugar. They target a protein receptor known as PPARgamma found in fat tissue throughout the body, either fully or partially activating it in order to lower blood sugar by increasing sensitivity to insulin and changing the metabolism of fat and sugar. "Type two diabetes is characterised by resistance to insulin with subsequent high blood sugar which leads to serious disease. It is usually associated with poor lifestyle factors such as diet and lack of exercise," says lead researcher Dr John Bruning, with the University's School of Biological Sciences and Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing. "Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Australia alone has more than tripled since 1990, with an estimated cost of $6 billion a year. The development of safe and more efficient therapeutics is therefore becoming increasingly important. "People with severe diabetes need to take insulin but having to inject this can be problematic, and it's difficult to get insulin levels just right. It's highly desirable for people to come off insulin injections and instead use oral t Continue reading >>

3 Tremendously Promising Diabetes Drugs Potentially On The Way

3 Tremendously Promising Diabetes Drugs Potentially On The Way

Here's the scary thing about diabetes: Over 30 million Americans have it, with an additional 1.4 million new diagnoses each year. The disease is the seventh-highest cause of death in the U.S. Those are concerning statistics, but there are also some numbers that provide hope. Over 170 new medicines are currently in development targeting treatment of diabetes and diabetes-related conditions. Here are three of the most promising diabetes drugs from five of the most innovative drugmakers in the world: Merck (NYSE:MRK), Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), Lexicon Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:LXRX), Sanofi (NYSE:SNY), and Novo Nordisk (NYSE:NVO). 1. Ertugliflozin Merck and Pfizer are collaborating on development of ertugliflozin, an experimental drug for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. The drug could be approved in the U.S. later this year as a stand-alone treatment, in combination with Merck's Januvia, and in combination with metformin. Ertugliflozin belongs to a class of medicines known as SGLT2 inhibitors. These drugs lower blood sugar by causing the kidneys to remove sugar from the body through the urine. Several SGLT2 inhibitors are already available, including Farxiga, Invokana, and Jardiance. Results from late-stage clinical studies conducted by Merck and Pfizer were very encouraging. Not only did ertugliflozin help lower blood sugar levels, but patients taking the experimental drug also experienced weight reduction and lower blood pressure levels. 2. Sotagliflozin Another promising SGLT inhibitor might not be too far behind ertugliflozin. Lexicon and Sanofi are evaluating sotagliflozin in late-stage studies. The drug could potentially reach the market within the next couple of years if all goes well. Sotagliflozin inhibits SGLT1 and SGLT2 proteins. SGLT1 is responsible for glucose Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs And Medication In Development

Diabetes Drugs And Medication In Development

Tweet New research constantly uncovers new diabetes drugs that are developed by biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies through several clinical trial phases. To be approved for use amongst people with diabetes, new diabetes drugs and medications must go through stringent testing to ensure their efficiency. Most new diabetes drugs serve a specific purpose, such as better controlling blood glucose or increasing the efficiency of another medication. Drugs can take up to 10 years to come to the market. When drugs are referenced in the media about their positive impact on mice or other test subjects, it is often several years before they are tested on humans. The following diabetes drugs are currently under development. Diabetes drug treatments currently in development New drug treatments for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes The following drug is in development for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. NN1250/Insulin Degludec/Tresiba NN1250/Insulin Degludec is being developed by Novo Nordisk and has reached phase 3 clinical trials. This is a completely neutral, soluble, and subcutaneous ultra-long-acting new-generation insulin that lasts for over 24 hours. This insulin is designed for basal insulin treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also under development is NN5401/Insulin DegludecPlus. Update: Insulin Degludec was launched in the UK in February 2013 under the trade name Tresiba, but was rejected for use by NHS Scotland in April. New drug treatments for Type 2 diabetes LY2405319 LY2405319 is a new drug being developed by Eli Lilly. The drug is in a new class of treatments known as FGF21 analogues. FGF21 stands for fibroblast growth factor 21, which is a hormone in the body that stimulates glucose uptake of adipose cells (fat cells). In initial p Continue reading >>

Top 20 Diabetes Drugs

Top 20 Diabetes Drugs

Find out which treatments are the biggest sellers. Following is a list of 20 FDA-approved treatments for patients with diabetes ranked by their 2013 sales, as reported by the companies that market them. Drugs are listed by name, sponsor(s), and sales data. Missing from the list are several treatments which were either launched last year with no sales numbers furnished by their marketers, or were launched this year. An example of the former is Johnson & Johnson’s Invokana (canagliflozin), which the company said enjoyed “strong sales” last year, without disclosing a figure. The closest to an actual number is a widely quoted estimate by Wells Fargo analyst Lawrence Biegelson projecting that Invokana was to have generated $122 million in first-year 2013 sales. Next year’s list could include several diabetes products approved this year. Two examples of these are Boehringer Ingelheim’s Jardiance (empagliflozin), a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor for type 2 diabetes in adults; and Eli Lilly’s Trulicity (dulaglutuide), a weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist for adults with type 2 diabetes. The FDA also approved AstraZeneca’s SGLT2 inhibitor Farxiga (dapagliflozin) on January 8—two months after the European Commission gave its nod to the drug under the trade name Forxiga. Farxiga/Forxiga was developed through AstraZeneca’s former diabetes alliance with Bristol-Myers Squibb, until BMS sold its interest to AZ in a deal completed February 1 and valued at up to $4.3 billion. A twice-daily combination treatment of dapagliflozin and metformin, trade-named Xigduo, won European marketing authorization on January 22, 2014, while a once-daily formulation, Xigduo XR, got FDA’s nod on October 29 and earlier gained Australian approval. Continue reading >>

Present And Future Challenges In Type 2 Diabetes

Present And Future Challenges In Type 2 Diabetes

Present and future challenges in Type 2 diabetes. Summer 11 By Dr Lesley J Millatt, Dr Rmy Hanf and Dr Dean W Hum According to the International Diabetes Federation, more than 285 million people (6.4% of the world population) are currently estimated to suffer from diabetes, a figure which is expected to rise to 438 million (7.8%) by 2030. Moreover, the World Health Organisation calculates that nearly three million deaths worldwide are attributable to diabetes each year; by 2030, this figure is expected to double. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) accounts for approximately 90% of the cases of diabetes. These astonishing statistics help to illustrate the epidemic prevalence of T2DM, and the major need for effective diagnostic, intervention and disease management strategies. Prediabetes is presently defined as moderately elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG), and is estimated to affect 79 million adult Americans, or 35% of the adult population. This altered glucose metabolism state is associated with an increased risk of developing T2DM (Figure 1), although other parameters including excess adiposity, inflammation and dyslipidemia are risk factors associated with the development of insulin resistance, loss of pancreatic function, worsening of hyperglycemia and progression to diabetes1. Type 2 diabetics, but also prediabetics, are at increased risk for a wide range of debilitating diseases and diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of kidney failure and blindness and of nontraumatic lower limb amputation. Moreover, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is 2-4 times higher in diabetics2. An emerging lesser known, but potentially fatal complication of T2DM is the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (steatosis), that leads to the chronic liver disorder Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disea Continue reading >>

25 Diabetes Drugs In The Pipeline Right Now

25 Diabetes Drugs In The Pipeline Right Now

Meet the new weapons in the war against the chronic metabolic disease. If diabetes were a stock, it'd be booming: the CDC says that the number of people with diagnosed diabetes has increased by 373% over the past 30 years, from 5.6 million in 1980 to 20.9 million in 2011. What new medicines are coming out to help turn diabetes' boom into a bust? You've seen GEN's list of 15 breast cancer drugs that are currently in the pipeline; now, GEN has compiled a list of 25 drug candidates for which diabetes is at least one proposed or approved indication, and for which one indication has reached Phase III or Registration phases. Each entry includes the name of the drug candidate, the sponsor, and, where applicable, collaboration partners; method of action; indication (by market, where applicable); and phase of trial. Some products are still in clinical trial phases for new indications or formulations after winning marketing approval for initial indications; these approvals, where applicable, are listed on the bottom of each entry. Sponsor/Developer: GlaxoSmithKline; developed by Human Genome Sciences, which licensed the drug for late-stage trials before Glaxo acquired HGS in a $3 billion deal completed Aug. 3 Mechanism of action: Glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 agonist Indication (Phase): Once-weekly for type 2 diabetes (Phase III completed; NDA expected to be filed early 2013) Sponsor/Developer: Takeda Pharmaceuticals and Furiex Pharmaceuticals Mechanism of action: DPP-4 inhibitor Indication (Phase): U.S.—Oral treatment of type 2 diabetes, individually and as a fixed-dose combination (FDC) with the thiazolidinedione pioglitazone (Registration; NDA re-submitted July 2012 after initial NDA rejected via complete response letter April 2012) EU—Oral treatment of type 2 diabetes (Re Continue reading >>

Two Diabetes Drug Mysteries

Two Diabetes Drug Mysteries

Here are some data to file under “Drugs do things that we don’t expect”. The SGLT-2 inhibitors are a class of diabetes medications that work by inhibiting the sodium/glucose transporter 2 protein in the kidneys. That keeps glucose from being reabsorbed there; instead, more of it is removed in the urine, and that lowers circulating glucose levels. One side effect, as you might imagine, is an increased risk of urinary tract infections, but overall, the class seems to have a lot of beneficial effects. Too many beneficial effects, actually. One of the major drugs in this category, Jardiance (empagliflozin) from Boehringer and Lilly, has recently been the subject of a big outcomes trial by the two companies. And the results were good – the drug reduced cardiovascular mortality, all-causes mortality, and hospitalizations from heart failure. Good news! But when the team dug further into the data, things got weird. You’d think that these benefits would be due to reductions in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower LDL cholesterol, lower blood pressure, etc. But when they corrected for all these factors, the effects persisted. “It’s quite clear that the results that we see” from the drugmakers’ Empa-Reg Outcome study—including the 38% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular death—“really is not explained through these classical risk factors we have all been aware of for some decades now,” Thomas Seck, Boehringer’s VP of clinical development and medical affairs for its primary care unit, said in an interview. So what the heck is it explained by? At this point, no one knows. This is reminiscent of the situation with statins, whose good outcomes are not completely explained by their reduction of LDL levels. This should serve as a reminder that (1) there Continue reading >>

Where Are All The New Diabetes Drugs?

Where Are All The New Diabetes Drugs?

As oncologists race forward with new treatments verging on science fiction and biotech companies press on with drugs for once-hopeless rare disorders, one of the world’s most pervasive diseases looks like it’s been left behind. There are few new drugs on the horizon for diabetes, which affects about 29 million Americans. Most of the treatments in late-stage development are simply improved versions of what’s out there — taken weekly versus daily, or orally instead of by injection. Continue reading >>

2017 Pipelines: Analysing Future Trends In The $12billion Diabetes Market

2017 Pipelines: Analysing Future Trends In The $12billion Diabetes Market

2017 pipelines: Analysing future trends in the $12billion diabetes market The latest 2017 pipelines explores new emerging methods of glucose monitoring, analysing these technologies in the new report from IDTechEx Research People with diabetes have traditionally self-monitored their glucose levels using disposable biosensors and invasive sampling techniques. While this industry has been one of the success stories of the printed electronics industry, worth around $6 billion today, profitability is falling as government reimbursement models are changing and strain is put on both consumers and manufacturers. However new methods of glucose monitoring are emerging. These technologies are analysed comprehensively in the brand-new report from IDTechEx Research . Glucose is present in many biological fluids at varying levels and a wide range of players are investigating ways to utilise these fluids for long term glucose monitoring. The most successful of these ventures have been in measuring glucose in interstitial fluid, where continuous glucose monitors are receiving regulatory approval and adoption by people with diabetes across Europe and North America. Continuous glucose monitors consist of a wearable sensor and a receiver (which in many cases can be a smartphone). The sensor consists of a microneedle which sits just under the skin and records glucose levels at regular intervals and transmits these to the reader via Bluetooth or NFC technology. Sensors last an average of 6 days, and currently require regular calibration with blood based biosensors. Companies are investigating the potential for glucose testing in sweat, tears and saliva with varying levels of success and these projects are also analysed in the new IDTechEx report. Such long-term monitoring solutions will e Continue reading >>

What's New In Endocrinology And Diabetes Mellitus

What's New In Endocrinology And Diabetes Mellitus

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. The following represent additions to UpToDate from the past six months that were considered by the editors and authors to be of particular interest. The most recent What's New entries are at the top of each subsection. DIABETES MELLITUS ACE inhibitors and statins do not prevent moderately increased albuminuria or progression of retinopathy in type 1 diabetes (November 2017) Angiotensin inhibition and statin therapy have been proposed as treatments to prevent microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, although evidence has not supported this hypothesis. In a 2x2 placebo-controlled trial of quinapril and atorvastatin in 443 normoalbuminuric and normotensive adolescents with type 1 diabetes, neither drug reduced the incidence of moderately increased albuminuria (primary outcome), and neither drug significantly reduced the progression of retinopathy (an exploratory outcome) [1]. Thus, UpToDate continues to recommend that angiotensin inhibition and statin therapy not be used for primary prevention of microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. (See "Moderately increased albuminuria (microalbuminuria) in type 1 diabetes mellitus", section on 'ACE inhibitors or ARBs' and "Diabetic retinopathy: Prevention and treatment", section on 'Prevention'.) Continuous glucose monitoring in patients with type 2 diabe Continue reading >>

Improving Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Improving Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Scientists are exploring a central component in glucose regulation. Their findings shed new light on the structure of the glucagon receptor, a highly promising target for diabetes drug development. Beam me up: The new Nature study reports the crystal structure of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR) that plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and serves as an important drug target for Type 2 diabetes. X-ray crystallography yields the complete, detailed, architecture of this class B membrane protein receptor for the first time, dramatically improving the prospects for a new generation of highly specific drugs for treating Type 2 diabetes with greater effectiveness and fewer side effects. Credit: Graphic by Jason Drees for the Biodesign Institute Beam me up: The new Nature study reports the crystal structure of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR) that plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and serves as an important drug target for Type 2 diabetes. X-ray crystallography yields the complete, detailed, architecture of this class B membrane protein receptor for the first time, dramatically improving the prospects for a new generation of highly specific drugs for treating Type 2 diabetes with greater effectiveness and fewer side effects. Credit: Graphic by Jason Drees for the Biodesign Institute Type 2 diabetes, a prolific killer, is on a steep ascent. According to the World Health Organization, the incidence of the condition has grown dramatically from 108 million cases in 1980 to well over 400 million today. The complex disease occurs when the body's delicate regulation of glucose, a critical metabolite, is disrupted, creating a condition of elevated blood sugar known hyper Continue reading >>

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes is achieved by acting in our brain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, in collaboration with teams from the Universities of Cambridge and Michigan, have discovered that the medication Lorcaserin acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes by modifying the activity of neurones that help to regulate blood glucose levels. Lorcaserin is prescribed to help patients lose weight and works by regulating how hungry we feel. However, researchers have discovered that as well as doing this, the drug can also reduce glucose levels in the body and increase the body's cells sensitivity to insulin. When the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body's cells fail to react to insulin this leads to Type 2 diabetes meaning that glucose remains in the blood rather than being used as fuel for energy. Professor Lora Heisler, who is leading the Aberdeen team, explains: "Current medications for type 2 diabetes improve symptoms of this disease by acting in the body. We have discovered that this obesity drug, lorcaserin, acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes. "Lorcaserin targets important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which are responsible for regulating appetite. So as well as sending messages telling us we are full and no longer need to eat, leading to weight loss, the POMC hormones also activate a different brain circuit that helps keep our blood glucose in check. "This discovery is important because type 2 diabetes is an incredibly prevalent disease in the modern world and new treat Continue reading >>

Medicines In Development For Diabetes 2016 Report

Medicines In Development For Diabetes 2016 Report

The U.S. diabetes epidemic affects millions, with 1.4 million new cases diagnosed each year. Today, more than 30 million Americans are living with diabetes, including 7 million who are unaware they have the disease. While significant progress has been made in treatment, it is still the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. America’s biopharmaceutical researchers are persistent in their efforts to develop novel therapies to treat this complex and challenging illness and to improve the quality of life for patients. Today, there are 171 medicines in development for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related conditions, such as chronic kidney disease and diabetic neuropathy. All of these medicines are in clinical trials or awaiting review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The cost of diagnosed diabetes is $245 billion in the United States, and biopharmaceutical researchers are tirelessly working to find new lifesaving and life-changing treatments and cures to address this complex disease and the costs associated with it. “Diabetes is a challenging disease to treat and manage, especially for the more than 200,000 young Americans affected by the disease under the age of 20,” said Stephen J. Ubl, president and chief executive officer of PhRMA. “There are nearly a quarter of a million children and young adults who are constantly managing a chronic condition. I’ve seen the impact this disease has had on my son and family, but the continued determination and progress of biopharmaceutical researchers who have dedicated their lives to finding new treatments and cures for diabetes provide hope for the future.” View the full report below and explore additional resources to learn more about the important work being done to combat diabetes. Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs that have recently hit the market. Lancing devices Motivated to help a friend with Type 2 diabetes, bioengineer Christopher Jacobs, PhD, developed a new lancing device, called Genteel, to reduce the pain of pricking fingertips. “I was moved by his distress, compelled by our friendship, and undone by the irresistible siren song that lies at the heart of every engineering challenge,” said Jacobs. For 10 years, Jacobs studied the limitations of current devices and the Continue reading >>

Global Diabetes Care Devices & Drugs Market 2017-2022: Development Of New Formulations And Insulin Delivery Technologies Fueling The $85+ Billion Industry

Global Diabetes Care Devices & Drugs Market 2017-2022: Development Of New Formulations And Insulin Delivery Technologies Fueling The $85+ Billion Industry

Global Diabetes Care Devices & Drugs Market 2017-2022: Development of New Formulations and Insulin Delivery Technologies Fueling the $85+ Billion Industry The "Diabetes Care Devices & Drugs Market - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast (2017-2022)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. Global diabetes care devices & drugs market is expected to reach USD 85,591.2 million by 2022, supported by a CAGR of 5.2% during the forecast period of 2017 to 2022. The global diabetes care devices & drugs market is mainly driven by the increasing incidence & prevalence of diabetes, technological advancements, rising obesity rate, and increasing sedentary lifestyle & improper diet. However, high cost associated with diagnosis and treatment, reimbursement issues, and lack of awareness is expected to hinder the growth of diabetes care devices & drugs market to some extent. Developments of new formulations and insulin delivery technologies serve as an opportunity for this market, whereas stringent regulations and registration process for the diabetes care devices & drugs poses significant challenge for the growth of diabetes care devices & drugs market. The global diabetes care devices & drugs market is mainly segmented by type of devices and drugs. The diabetes care devices market by type is further segmented into diabetes monitoring devices and insulin delivery devices. The drugs market by type is further segmented into insulin, oral-hypoglycemic agents, and non-insulin injectable. Diabetes care drugs market dominated the overall market in 2016, and is expected to grow significantly in the next 5-10 years. The large share of this market is mainly attributed to the huge demand for insulin and oral hypoglycemic drugs for the treatment of type I & II diab Continue reading >>

More in diabetes