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Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action. This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. It combines three growth factors. Problems with growth factor signalling have been shown to be impaired in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug ‘significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ In Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Diabetes Drug ‘significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ In Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Summary: Lancaster University researchers report a drug developed to treat diabetes shows promise in reversing memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s in mouse models of the disease. The drug appears to have a neuroprotective effect, enhancing brain growth factors while reducing amyloid plaques, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The drug also slows down the rate of neuron loss. Source: Lancaster University. A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s after scientists found it “significantly reversed memory loss” in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.” Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer’s Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “”With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s. It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them.” Although the benefits of these ‘triple agonist’ drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with ex Continue reading >>

Could A Three-part Diabetes Drug Ease Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s?

Could A Three-part Diabetes Drug Ease Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s?

The Alzheimer’s field is littered with drug-development failures, but that isn’t deterring a group of British scientists from looking for hope in an unlikely source: diabetes treatments. The team, from Lancaster University, is reporting that an experimental three-part drug originally developed for use in Type 2 diabetes seems to reverse memory loss in mice. The treatment combines the growth factors GLP-1, GIP and glucagon. The reasoning behind the approach is that growth factor signaling is impaired in the brains of people who suffer from Alzheimer’s, according to a statement from the university. When administered in mouse models of Alzheimer’s, the treatment reversed memory loss, which was measured via a maze test, the scientists reported in the journal Brain Research. The drug improved learning and memory formation, slowed down the rate at which nerve cells were lost in the brain, and enhanced levels of a growth factor that preserves the functioning of nerve cells, they said. It also reduced the amount of amyloid plaque—the abnormal brain growths that have been implicated in the disease. This is not the first time diabetes treatments have been tried in Alzheimer’s disease. Novo Nordisk’s Victoza (liraglutide), a GLP-1 agonist, has undergone small clinical trials in people with Alzheimer’s. The results “have shown real promise,” said Doug Brown, Ph.D., director of research and development at the London-based Alzheimer's Society, in the statement. That said, the most heavily cited clinical trial of Victoza in Alzheimer’s only showed a reduction in the buildup of amyloid plaque. But there was no difference in cognitive ability between trial participants who received the drug and those who took a placebo. That likely explains why further investigatio Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimers Symptoms In Mice; Reduces Brain Plaque Buildup And Improves Memory

Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimers Symptoms In Mice; Reduces Brain Plaque Buildup And Improves Memory

Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimers Symptoms in Mice; Reduces Brain Plaque Buildup and Improves Memory This diabetes drug could have a very advantageous second use. ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AFP/Getty Images Tech & Science Alzheimer's Disease diabetes Updated|Promising new animal research suggests a drug originally developed to treat diabetessignificantly reverses memory loss and brain degeneration in mice with a rodent version of Alzheimers disease. If the same is proven true in humans, the drug could one day be used asa treatment for Alzheimers disease and other memory-related illnesses. In the study, published online this week in Brain Research, scientists from Lancaster University in England used lab mice to test how effective a diabetes drug known as a triple receptor was in treating Alzheimers disease. The mice in the study were specifically created to express certain genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans. The researchers waited for the mice to age before giving them the drug, therefore giving their disease some time to develop and damage the animals brain. Once given the drug, the animals were then made to conduct a maze test designed to measure their memory. Results revealed that after being given the drug, aged mice who already had signs of a rodent version of Alzheimers disease showed improved learning and memory skills. The results were alsoseen on a biological level, and these mice displayedreduced amounts of plaque buildup in the brain, a major hallmark of Alzheimers disease. In addition, these mice also had reduced levels of chronic inflammation in their brains, overall slower rates of brain nerve cell loss and increased brain nerve cell protection. In Pictures: Top 50 U.S. Cities Ranked by Quality of Life And Average Salary The results suggest that t Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'Significantly Reversed Memory Loss' in Mice With Alzheimer's A drug developed for type 2 diabetes has " significantly reversed memory loss " in mice with Alzheimer's disease, and researchers now want to test it on humans. The treatment is exciting for scientists because it works by protecting the brain cells attacked by Alzheimer's disease in three separate ways, rather than relying on a single approach. And seeing as the drug has already been tested and approved for use in humans, it's something that could hit the market a lot faster than other experimental treatment options. The results have only been seen in mice so far, but the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," said senior author ChristianHlscher of Lancaster University in the UK. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," said Doug Brown from UK organisation, Alzheimer's Society. "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Previous research had already established a link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's - type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's, and it also appears to make the disease progress more rapidly. This could be a result of insulin not getting to the cells properly - insulin is a growth factor which is known to protect brain cells, and insulin resistance has been observed in Alzheimer's disease brains, as well as being the biological mechanism behind type 2 diabetes. So researchers have been investigating wh Continue reading >>

Could This Type Ii Diabetes Drug Help Reverse Alzheimer's?

Could This Type Ii Diabetes Drug Help Reverse Alzheimer's?

A drug developed to help diabetes shows that it can help reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s — at least in mice. The breakthrough, published this week in the journal Brain Research, shows a “clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders” like Alzheimer’s, the researchers wrote in the report. The drug is a triple receptor of GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, three biological molecules known as “growth factors” that help improve insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes. People with Alzheimer’s have reduced amounts of these growth factors in their brains. For the study, researchers led by Christian Holscher at Lancaster University in the U.K. implanted mice with mutated human genes that carry a hereditary form of Alzheimer’s. They then let the mice age for a couple of months so they would develop brain damage. The researchers then gave the drug to the mice and put them through a maze. The result? The showed a marked improvement in memory function and learning capabilities. “These very promising outcomes demonstrate the efficacy of these novel multiple receptor drugs that originally were developed to treat type 2 diabetes but have shown consistent neuro-protective effects in several studies," Holscher said in a press release. One in 10 Americans over age 65 show signs of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, and is the sixth leading cause of death — but not for lack of trying to find a cure. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia,” Doug Brown, Director of Research and Dev Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimer's Disease In Mice

Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimer's Disease In Mice

Diabetes Drug Reverses Alzheimer's Disease in Mice Mice treated with a repurposed diabetes medication performed better on learning and memory tests. A diabetes drug may be repurposed to treat Alzheimers disease according to a new study published by Brain Research, which demonstrated the potential of the treatment to reverse memory loss in mice models of the disease. The study authors said that these findings could significantly improve the treatment of Alzheimers disease, while demonstrating the potential benefits of repurposing drugs. Lead investigator Christian Holscher, PhD, said that the diabetes drug holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Patients with Alzheimers disease typically receive treatment with a variety of drugs that target the symptoms of the conditionsuch as mood swings without addressing the disease itself and the debilitating memory loss. With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's, said Doug Brown, PhD, director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Thus far, the benefits of triple agonist drugs have only been observed in mice. The authors noted that other studies have shown that FDA-approved treatmentssuch as liraglutideoffer hope to patients with Alzheimers disease. The authors noted that diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and has been known to contribute to the progression of the disease. Both conditions have been linked to insuli Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. VIDEO:A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action.This is the first... view more A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with exist Continue reading >>

'clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

'clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

A team of Chinese and British researchers has discovered that a drug originally created to treat diabetes shows “clear promise” as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, since it significantly reversed memory loss in mice. News of the potential breakthrough was published this week in Brain Research. “[The drug shows a] clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," the scientists’ report reads. “The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease,” they said, adding that amyloid plaque load, inflammation and oxidative stress were all visibly reduced. The new diabetes drug is a triple receptor that combines GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, three biological molecules known as “growth factors.” According to Newsweek, researchers tested the receptor in mice specifically created to express certain genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans and waited for them to age for a couple of months and sustain some brain damage. Once given the drug, the mice were put through a maze test and results showed a clear improvement in their learning and memory formation. "These very promising outcomes demonstrate the efficacy of these novel multiple receptor drugs that originally were developed to treat type 2 diabetes but have shown consistent neuro-protective effects in several studies," said lead researcher Christian Holscher said, in a press release from Lancaster University. The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease - Chinese and British research team "Clinical studies with an older version of this drug type already showed very promising results in people with Alzheimer's disease or with mood disorders," Holscher added. "Further dose-r Continue reading >>

Testing The Effect Of The Diabetes Drug Liraglutide In Alzheimer's Disease

Testing The Effect Of The Diabetes Drug Liraglutide In Alzheimer's Disease

Amount: 338,525 contribution to larger trial Scientific Title: Evaluating the effects of the novel GLP-1 analogue, Liraglutide, in patients with Alzheimer's disease (ELAD) study There is a connection between type 2 diabetes andAlzheimer's disease; people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than healthy people of the same age group. Recently, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes, called liraglutide, has shown promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Inlaboratory studiesit improves symptoms of Alzheimer's and reduces the amount ofamyloidplaques in the brain, a hallmark of the disease. In this study, the researchers are going to test the effect of liraglutide in people with Alzheimer's disease, to see whether the drug has positive effects on brain function and cognition. Theclinical trialwill recruit participants from around the country who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and are still considered to be in theearly stages. Each participant will receive either liraglutide or a placebo treatment, via injection, for one year. Theirbrain will be scannedat the start of the experiment and after 12 months to look for changes in brain glucose, inflammation and brain volume, all indicators of Alzheimer's. Participants will also undergo cognitive tests to assess whether the drug has an effect on memory and thinking. This trial is aPhase 2b trialwhich means that in addition to patient benefits, it will test for side-effects of the drug in people with Alzheimer's disease. Update: During the trial, people receiving liraglutide reported a perceived change in theirsymptoms afterthey stopped taking the drug. Therefore, at the end of the 12 month clinical trial, all participants will be offered the opportunity to join a 12 month op Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Could Help Alzheimers Patients Reverse Memory Loss

A Diabetes Drug Could Help Alzheimers Patients Reverse Memory Loss

A Diabetes Drug Could Help Alzheimers Patients Reverse Memory Loss Researchers Just Proposed a Radical New Way of Defining Alzheimer's. Could It Lead to Better Drugs? There have been no new Alzheimer's treatments introduced in the past 15 years, but new research suggests that a drug traditionally used to treat diabetes could be useful in treating Alzheimer's as well. British researchers found that the drug "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice, which opens the door to it being used to reduce memory loss in humans in the future. The study involved giving a triple-receptor drug to mice that had Alzheimer's and age-related brain deterioration. After they were given the drug, the mice were asked to go through a maze that tested their memory. Mice that were given the drug showed reduced plaque buildup in the brain (a sign of Alzheimer's) and overall improved memory. The cellular health of the mice that took the drug was also improved, as was inflammation that was previously seen on their brains, reports Genetic Engineering and Biology News . Researchers have been exploring the connection between Alzheimer's and diabetes for years. The study's findings could help further existing research as well as move toward finding better treatments for those suffering with Alzheimer's. The number of people with Alzheimers is currently expected to double by 2060 . Continue reading >>

Scientists Claim They Found A Drug That Significantly Reverses Memory Loss

Scientists Claim They Found A Drug That Significantly Reverses Memory Loss

A team at Lancaster University in the U.K. has discovered that a drug designed to treat type 2 diabetes may hold the key to fighting the memory loss that accompanies Alzheimers disease. Their study has been published in Brain Research . The medication is a triple receptor drug that combines the growth factors GLP-1, GIP, and Glucagon to protect the brain from degeneration. The researchers tested the medication using transgenic mice expressing the mutated genes that cause Alzheimers in humans. These genes run in families and are responsible for a form of Alzheimers that can be inherited. The researchers observed the mice as they made their way through a water maze. They discovered that the mice treated with the diabetes compound showed an improved memory and sense of direction. Remarkably, the drug not only seemed to protect the brain, but also to reverse some of the damage caused by the amyloid plaques that progressively kill the neurons of Alzheimers patients. The way the drug works is that it can help neurons to repair and restore their functions again. It cannot bring back dead neurons once they are gone, they are gone, lead author Christian Holscher of Lancaster University told Futurism. However, there are a lot of stressed neurons that are still alive but no longer function properly. Thats where the window of opportunity lies. The first clinical trials showed the same effect in people, so it is not just some mouse artifact, added Holscher. A recent phase II clinical trial in Parkinsons patients showed some really nice results, so we are getting close! Because diabetes is a risk factor in Alzheimers, some scientists are hopeful that diabetes drugs could be effective treatments for neurodegeneration. According to the study, the link between the two could be that ins Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Mice Suffering From Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Mice Suffering From Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Mice Suffering From Alzheimer's In a breakthrough trial, scientists have discovered that a common diabetes drug significantly reverses memory loss in mice that have Alzheimers disease, a disorder thataffects 5.5 million Americans. Finding effective ways to tackle Alzheimer's is of top priority, sodiscovering that a drug normally used to treat type 2 diabetes can actually reverse the disease at least in mice, anyway is exciting. Thefindings are published in the journal Brain Research . According to lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher, the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's, added Dr Doug Brown from Alzheimers Society. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia." The new drug is known as a triple receptor drug, meaning that it targets Alzheimers in multiple ways. People with Alzheimers have impaired growth factors substances like hormones that stimulate growth in their brains. Therefore, the treatment combines three growth factors: GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon. The drug was tested on mice genetically modified to develop Alzheimers. The animals were injected with the triple receptor drug every day for two months before being subjected to a maze test. After treatment, elderly mice in the advanced stages of Alzheimers showed better learning and memory formation when completing the test. Their rate of nerve cell loss declined, they had fewer Alzheimers-linked plaques in their brains, and they had higher levels of a brain growth factor that p Continue reading >>

Triple-acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

Triple-acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

Triple-Acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models Studies in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease (AD) have shown how a drug that was originally developed to treat diabetes demonstrates what researchers in the U.K. and China call clear promise as a treatment for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders in humans. The studies, led by Christian Hlscher, Ph.D., at the U.K.s Lancaster University, confirmed that AD mice treated using a triple-receptor agonist (TA) showed significantly reversed memory loss, as well as reduced neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, lower amyloid plaque load in the brain, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), a key growth factor that protects synaptic function. ...these findings show that novel TAs are a promising lead for the design of future treatment strategies in AD, the researchers write in their published paper in Brain Research, which is entitled Neuroprotective Effects of a Triple GLP-1/GIP/Glucagon Receptor Agonist in the APP/PS1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease . Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a known risk factor for AD, and this association has motivated scientists to investigate whether antidiabetic drugs might also be effective against AD. Studies have shown that the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), which have antidiabetic properties, can play a neuroprotective role in the brain and have demonstrated promising effects in animal models of AD. Prof. Holschers team turned to a triple-receptor agonist that activates GIP-1, GIP, and glucagon receptors. The drug had previously been in development for treating diabetes, but hadnt been assessed for any neuroprotective properties. They test Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Found To Reverse Symptoms Of Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Mice

Diabetes Drug Found To Reverse Symptoms Of Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Mice

The fascinating connection between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease has been studied for several years, with some scientists going so far as to suggest the two conditions are different stages of the same disease. A team of researchers has now discovered that a drug initially developed to treat type 2 diabetes has "significantly reversed memory loss" in early animal trials. The new research led by Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University looked at the neuro-protective effects of a novel diabetes drug called a triple receptor agonist. This drug was initially designed to treat type 2 diabetes by activating GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon growth factor receptors in the brain. The less time you spend thinking about your cargo, the more time you can spend running your busin... The study used transgenic mice engineered to express the same mutated genes that cause Alzheimer's in humans. After exposure to the triple receptor agonist the mice displayed significant improvements in a maze-based memory test and reductions in chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and amyloid plaques in the brain. Past research has already confirmed that single agonist drugs developed for diabetes display neuroprotective effects in animal models, but this is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been studied for these effects. Professor Holscher sees clear promise in these results, and while more research needs to be done, this does point to a potential new treatment for those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Here we show that a novel triple receptor drug shows promise as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's but further dose-response tests and direct comparisons with other drugs have to be conducted in order to evaluate if this new drugs is superior to previous ones," says Holscher. Continue reading >>

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