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Diabetes Drinking Water

Drink More Water

Drink More Water

Last month I was taken to the emergency room because my blood pressure dropped. It turned out I had gone low because of dehydration. I’m really embarrassed because I hadn’t realized how important hydration is. It was scary. I could sit up, but only for about a minute. Then I’d have to lie down again. Couldn’t even think about standing (which is hard enough for me on a good day). I was in the ER for about 12 hours getting IV fluids before I was strong enough to go home. Lord knows what it will cost, and all because I didn’t drink enough. I didn’t know I had a viral infection. They found that on a white blood count in the ER. But I did know I was eating lots of fiber, which absorbs water, and not drinking much. I just didn’t know I could get in so much physical trouble from a little dryness. For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes. According to the British diabetes site diabetes.co.uk, other causative factors for dehydration include insufficient fluid intake, sweating because of hot weather or exercise, alcohol, diarrhea, or vomiting. The symptoms of mild dehydration include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, fatigue, and dark-colored urine. Severe dehydration causes all those symptoms plus low blood pressure, sunken eyes, weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat, confusion, and lethargy. But many people, especially older people, don’t get these symptoms. It seems that thirst signals become weaker as we age. Diabetes may get people used to thirst s Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Diet: Drinking This Beverage Will Slash Risk Of Developing Disease

Diabetes Type 2 Diet: Drinking This Beverage Will Slash Risk Of Developing Disease

Diabetes type 2 diet: Sugary drinks such as soda should be avoided Adding avocado to your diet can also help to regulate blood sugar . If you have type 2 diabetes, adding avocado to your diet may help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and increase insulin sensitivity, said medical website Healthline. Avocados are low in carbohydrates, which means they have little effect on blood sugar levels. Part of what makes avocados a good choice for people with diabetes is that, although they are low in carbs, they are high in fibre. Many other high-fibre foods may still spike blood sugar levels. Diabetes type 2 diet: Even a naturally sweet drink such as juice isn't advised There are also snacks sufferers can enjoy that will help them to control blood sugar levels . Diabetes UK says it usually isnt necessary to eat snacks between meals if you arent taking any medication for your diabetes type 2. But if you treat your diabetes with certain medication that put you at risk of hypos (low blood glucose), you may need to snack. If you do get peckish between meals, the charity says the healthiest snack choices are a piece of fruit, rice cakes or fat free yoghurt. Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 Best and Worst Drinks for Type 2 Diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you know it's important to watch what you eat — and the types of drinks you consume. Drinks that are high in carbohydrates and calories can affect both your weight and your blood sugar. "Generally speaking, you want your calories and carbs to come from whole foods, not from drinks," says Nessie Ferguson, RD, CDE, a nutritionist at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The best drinks have either zero or very few calories, and deciding on a beverage isn't really difficult. "When it comes right down to it, good beverage choices for type 2 diabetes are good choices for everyone," she says. Some good drinks for type 2 diabetes include: Water Fat-free or low-fat milk Black coffee Unsweetened tea (hot or iced) Flavored water (zero calories) or seltzer But sugary soda is one of the worst types of drinks for type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. The problems with soda include: Empty calories. Soft drinks are very high in sugar, have zero nutritional value, and are often used in place of healthy drinks such as milk. Cavities. The high sugar combined with the acid in soda dissolves tooth enamel, which increases the risk of cavities. Weight gain. Sugary sodas have about 10 teaspoons of sugar per 12-ounce can. Boosts risk of diabetes and risk of complications for those who have diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes continue to drink alcohol, but you should be aware that any alcohol consumption may result in dangerously low blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar often and get your doctor's okay before you drink alcohol. People with diabetes should only consume alcohol if their diabetes is well controlled and should always wear a medical Continue reading >>

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

THE FACTS There are many reasons to stay properly hydrated, but only recently have scientists begun to consider diabetes prevention one of them. The amount of water you drink can play a role in how your body regulates blood sugar, researchers have found. The reason: a hormone called vasopressin, which helps regulate water retention. When the body is dehydrated, vasopressin levels rise, prompting the kidneys to hold onto water. At the same time, the hormone pushes the liver to produce blood sugar, which over time may strain the ability to produce or respond to insulin. One of the largest studies to look at the consequences was published last year in Diabetes Care, a publication of the American Diabetes Association. French scientists tracked more than 3,000 healthy men and women ages 30 to 65 for nearly a decade. All had normal blood sugar levels at the start of the research. After nine years, about 800 had developed Type 2 diabetes or high blood sugar. But those who consumed the most water, 17 to 34 ounces a day, had a risk roughly 30 percent lower than that of those who drank the least. The researchers controlled for the subjects’ intake of other liquids that could have affected the results, mainly sugary and alcoholic drinks, as well as exercise, weight and other factors affecting health. The researchers did not look at eating habits, something future studies may take into account. THE BOTTOM LINE There is some evidence that proper hydration can help protect against high blood sugar, though more research is needed. Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

June 30, 2011 (San Diego) -- Drinking about four or more 8-ounce glasses of water a day may protect against the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), French researchers report. In a study of 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the start of the study, those who reported that they drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next nine years than those who said they drank 16 ounces or less daily. The analysis took into account other factors that can affect the risk of high blood sugar, including sex, age, weight, and physical activity, as well as consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Still, the study doesn't prove cause and effect. People who drink more water could share some unmeasured factor that accounts for the association between drinking more water and lower risk of high blood sugar, says researcher Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Hospital Bichat in Paris. "But if confirmed, this is another good reason to drink plenty of water," he tells WebMD. The findings were presented here at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. About 79 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to result in a diagnosis of diabetes, according to the CDC. It raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. An additional 26 million have diabetes, the CDC says. Roussel notes that recent research indicates an association between the hormone vasopressin, which regulates water in the body, and diabetes. Despite the known influence of water intake on vasopressin secretion, no study has investigated a possible association between drinking water and risk of high blood sugar, he Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

Water For Diabetes

Water For Diabetes

How important is it for people with diabetes to stay hydrated? Some evidence shows it’s very important. A study of 3,600 people from France found that those who drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were less likely to develop high blood sugars (hyperglycemia) than those who drank 16 ounces of water or less. Subjects were followed for about nine years. Researchers controlled for age, sex, weight, physical activity, and consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Why would staying hydrated help control blood sugar? According to an article in The New York Times, being too dry releases a hormone called vasopressin. Vasopressin tells your kidneys to hold onto water and tells the liver release stored blood sugar. It also raises your blood pressure. Extra sugar should be passed out of the body in urine, but if there’s not much water and too much vasopressin in your system, the kidneys don’t make urine. Not drinking water can lead to overeating and weight gain. According to health writer Phyllis Edgerly, a research report from 2001 found that “In 37% [of Americans], the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger.” Dehydration also slows down the body’s metabolism and is a major cause of fatigue. How much water do you need? When you consider that our bodies are roughly 50% (in an elderly person) to 75% (in a newborn baby) water, it makes sense that we need to replace a fair amount each day. Dr. F. Batmanghelidj, MD, writes on his site, “The Water Cure” that, “Through activities of daily living, the average person loses about 3–4 liters (about 10–15 cups) of fluid a day in sweat, urine, exhaled air, and bowel movement. What is lost must be replaced by the fluid we drink and the food we eat. We lose approximately 1–2 liters of wa Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Importance Of Drinking Water

Diabetes: The Importance Of Drinking Water

Thursday, November 30th, 2017 / Published in Blogs , Filtered water and wellbeing Diabetes: The importance of drinking water Good hydration is important for health but this is particularly true for people living with diabetes. Due to the nature of their condition, diabetics are more susceptible to suffering from dehydration and its debilitating effects. Diabetes sees excessive levels of glucose in the body that cannot be controlled either as a result of there being no insulin as in the case of Type 1 diabetes or the body being unable to properly utilise insulin, as in type 2 diabetes. Left unmanaged this can cause serious health problems including retinopathy, an increased risk of heart disease and nerve damage. Why is hydration important with diabetes? As well as medical intervention diabetes patients have to take care over their lifestyle to help regulate their condition, this includes drinking enough fluids. Drinking water is important as when glucose levels are high fluids help the kidneys to flush excess sugar out of the body. High levels of glucose in the body draw out fluids putting people with diabetes at a higher risk of suffering dehydration. In fitting with this increased thirst is an early sign of diabetes. Drinking water regularly will help to maintain hydration as well as being good for general wellbeing and health. Having no added sugar, calories or carbohydrates makes water the ideal choice of drink for diabetics. Many fizzy drinks including diet versions are packed with sugar and carbohydrates and bring little or no nutritional value to the body. In the case of people who have been warned they are pre-diabetic, taking swift action to swap drinks laden with sugar and sweeteners for filtered water is an easy but important step to take control of their li Continue reading >>

Water Can Heal - Water And Diabetes | Apec Water

Water Can Heal - Water And Diabetes | Apec Water

Have you ever been dying of thirst and a coworker or friend said, "You know, you may have diabetes?" Sounds like a stretch, but in reality, thirst can be a signal of this disease that is taking America by storm. So why is thirst linked to diabetes? According to a 1995 CNN.com article, with diabetes, excess blood sugar, or glucose, in your body draws water from your tissues, making you feel dehydrated. To quench your thirst, you drink a lot of water and other beverages which leads to more frequent urination. If you notice unexplained increases in your thirst and urination, see your doctor. It may not necessarily mean you have diabetes. It could be something else. If you already have diabetes, then you know that you already have to make some changes to your diet. As mentioned above, drinking water in place of the sugary options is crucial. Water is, according to diabetes-specialists, important for everybody, but especially for diabetes-patients, because even a small decrease of the hydration-level could cause serious health problems for diabetics. One of the best warning signs that glucose levels are high is thirst. And, water is the best way to quench that thirst, and to break down those sugars. Also, in order to keep the body functioning normally, water should be a constant. But, water can be lost through exercise and normal exposure to high temps. With that, being hydrated will help prevent fatigue and help physical performance. A study presented at the annual meeting of American diabetes association included 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study. Those who reported they drank more than 36 ounces of water a day (4.5 cups) were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next 9 years than those who said they drank 16 oun Continue reading >>

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

This article was originally from the weekly Diabetes Daily Newsletter. To receive your copy, create a free Diabetes Daily account. Picture a glass of water. Mix in a little sugar and stir until it dissolves. Now place it outside on a hot, sunny day. As the water evaporates, the remaining water gets sweeter and sweeter. If you have diabetes, this happens to your blood when you’re dehydrated. Because your blood is 83% water, when you lose water, the volume of blood decreases and the sugar remains the same. More concentrated blood sugar means higher blood sugars. The lesson: stay hydrated to avoid unnecessary high blood sugars. How Much Water Should I Drink? The average person loses about 10 cups of water per day through sweat and urination. At the same time, you gain fluid from drinking liquids and eating food. So how much you need to drink is a tricky question. You may have heard the “drink 8 glass of water a day” rule. Where did this rule come from? As Barbara Rolls, a nutrition research at Pennsylvania State University says: “I can’t even tell you that, and I’ve writen a book on water!” It turns out that there’s no basis for this in the medical literature. The easiest way to tell is looking at your urine. If it’s a little yellow, you’re probably hydrated. If it’s darker, then you need to drink more fluids. You can also go with your own intuition. Are you thirsty? Drink! If you’re busy or stuck at a desk for long periods, make sure you have a water bottle so you can easily answer when your body calls for water. Does Coffee or Tea Count? Yes! Although consuming caffeine can cause your body to shed some water, you still gain more water than you shed. And studies have shown that this effect is partically non-existent for people who drink caffeine re Continue reading >>

Have Enough Water For Good Heath?

Have Enough Water For Good Heath?

Like many people with diabetes, Gayle Hoover Thorne of Sacramento, California, was led to her type 2 diagnosis by water—or rather, the feeling that she couldn’t get enough of it. Thorne sought her doctor’s help because she was “sleeping all the time and thirsty.” When a person with diabetes overindulges in carbohydrates, they will soon experience a terrific thirst. “I can only assume that the water taken for that thirst helps dilute the sugars and flush them out,” says Thorne. Actually, thirst arises because the body is already drawing on its existing supply of water to flush out those sugars, which cannot pass out on their own. Instead, they siphon water out of the body. “When blood sugar goes up, it starts a diuretic effect, resulting in excessive water loss,” the reason frequent urination is another common diabetes symptom, says Robert Meloni, MD, and fellow of the American College of Endocrinology. “This leads to dehydration and excessive thirst, which is unrelieved until the blood sugar is lowered—then water replenishment will help.” With water estimated to make up 70 percent of our body weight (and 85 percent of our brain), everyone needs to drink adequate amounts to avoid dehydration. For those with diabetes, it’s especially essential, with water at the root of almost every preventive lifestyle measure. Going with the Flow As Thorne learned more about her diabetes, she also learned more about the benefits of water. “We know it’s important to get enough, but the VHL Family Alliance described in its March 2001 Forum Research Report that 75 percent of Americans are chronically dehydrated, and in 37 percent, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger,” says Thorne. “Even mild dehydration will slow down the b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Adopting good eating and drinking habits is important to manage diabetes. Drinking water is a healthy solution to reduce sugar impact in a diabetic diet. The number of types 2 diabetes cases will increase by 50% in 2015 as compared to 2005, according to the WHO. Moreover, type 2 diabetes, which used to be diagnosed in middle-aged individuals a few decades ago, is now reaching the paediatric population. If someone has diabetes symptoms he has to see a doctor without waiting more. Though there are a variety of factors that lead to type 2 diabetes, the trend is highly correlated to an increase in calorie intake, especially from added sugars. No sugar for a better blood glucose In case of diabetes, decrease quantity of calories related to sugars in drinking habits is highly recommended. According to the American Heart Association, added sugars shouldn’t exceed : 100 calories for a woman 150 calories for a man Pure water contains no calories and no sugar. That is why drinking water should be considered as the main source of hydration. ​ Continue reading >>

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There’s talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans. It all comes down to this: What it’s really about-the one, single thing it’s about-is lowering that sky-high blood sugar number. That’s it. Everything follows from getting that blood sugar number down. It doesn’t matter how you got there, and it doesn’t matter what you did. What’s important, what’s critical for you right here, right now, is to lower that number. Here are five simple ways to lower your blood sugar. The list doesn’t including the most obvious choices (medication) because you know them already. These are some methods you might not have thought about. 1. Stay on your feet The simple answer that doctors give diabetics (especially type 2s) who want lower their blood sugars is to exercise. And it works! But what if you’re not the exercising type? What if the sight of a treadmill or exercise bike or running shoes gives you the fits? That’s okay, too, actually. You might want to consider simply spending a chunk of each day on your feet. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, simple activities like sweeping the floor or dusting the shelves or taking the dog out for a walk are all healthy ways to stay active. You will burn calories, and you will move that blood sugar number down. 2. Drink water Believe it or not, evidence suggests that staying hydrated can have an effect on blood sugars and whether or not people develop type 2 diabetes. Is the effect it a big one? We’re not sure yet. But a 3,000-person study cited in the New York Times showed that people who drank the most water-17 to 34 ounces a day-were 30 Continue reading >>

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