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Endocrinology Physician Salary

Endocrinology Physician Salary

August 25, 2011 thuchuynh endocrinology No comments An endocrinologist is a physician who deals with diseases related to the bodys glands and hormones. These seemingly insignificant items are actually the vital functions of how you grow, how you feel, your metabolism, and tissue function. Think diabetes, menopause, and thyroid problems and that will scratch the surface of what endocrinologists are specialists of. This field is primarily office-based but you may be called into the hospital once in awhile for an endocrinology emergency like thyroid storm. Endocrinologists who also have pediatric training might be called in to the hospital more often for children presenting with life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis. Right now, there are 25.8 million patients with diabetes. So the demand for an endocrinology physician is there and increasing. Surprisingly, the median salary for this specialist position is $187,695. Thats only $15,068 more than the average salary for family medicine doctors. The salary range for endocrinologists is $158,805 to $235,781. But there is a potential to earn more. Approximately 20% of endocrinologists make between $200,000 and $300,000. Some endocrinologists make over $500,000! With diabetes very prevalent in society, there are many clinical research trials available to endocrinology physicians only. With clinical research, you act as a principle investigator, recruit patients into a study, examine and treat them according to strict protocols, and report back to the sponsor of the trial. For every patient that you recruit, you are given a set amount of money. Physicians doing this kind of research can earn a few hundred per patient to even thousands per patient. It is a great way to supplement your income. In order to become an endocrinologist, Continue reading >>

Doctors' Salaries: Who Gets Paid The Most? Least?

Doctors' Salaries: Who Gets Paid The Most? Least?

(CBS News) Do doctors make the big bucks? According to the latest annual survey from Medscape from WebMD, physicians across the board are earning less - and worrying more. Moreover, if they had a chance to start their careers all over again, 46 percent of doctors would not choose medicine, the report shows. "Physicians' sense of worry may be greater than the reality, but it's understandable," Judy Aburmishan, a partner in FGMK, LLC in Chicago, a firm that represents physicians and other healthcare providers, told Medscape. "Hospitals are buying up private practices both in primary care and the specialties. The heavy-handed message they send out is that if you don't join us, you won't survive. There is great uncertainty and fear about what healthcare reform will mean for physicians once it's fully implemented." Medscape surveyed 24,000 doctors from across 25 different medical specialties. The survey found wide pay differences, depending on the doctor's specialty - or gender. Female doctors make 40 percent less than male doctors. Who gets paid the most? And who earns the least? Keep clicking to see the top 5 highest and lowest paid doctors... Top 5 highest-paid doctors 5. Urologists (TIE) Urologists specialize in diseases of the urinary organs - including urinary tract stones, incontinence, and male infertility. They get paid an average annual salary of $309,000. 5. Anesthesiologists (TIE) Doctors who administer anesthetics to patients during surgery or other medical procedures are among the highest paid. Anesthesiologists receive a salary of $309,000. 1. Orthopedic surgeons (TIE) Who are the highest paid docs? Doctors who perform surgeries involving the musculoskeletal system, including those from sports injuries and degenerative diseases. Orthopedic surgeons get paid a Continue reading >>

Physician Earnings: Income Is Up, Morale Is Split

Physician Earnings: Income Is Up, Morale Is Split

Physician Earnings: Income Is Up, Morale Is Split Reprinted with permission from Medscape ( www.medscape.com ), 2013, full article available at: www.medscape.com/viewarticle/782575 Physician income overall is on the rise again in almost every specialty, reversing a decline in compensation during the past several years. Eight specialties earned a mean of at least $300,000 last year, and primary care physicians also posted gains. Doctors arent ready to break out the champagne just yet, though. Frustration with medical practice is also on the rise, and physicians are making changes in their practice by adding ancillary services, moving toward employment, and scrutinizing their payers, as doctors keep an eye toward the bottom line. Those are some of the highlights from Medscapes Physician Compensation Report: 2013 Results. The report is based on an extensive survey of almost 22,000 US physicians representing 25 specialties. The main dynamic behind rising income is that more and more doctors are leaving private practice, said Tommy Bohannon, Divisional Vice President of Hospital-Based Recruiting for Merritt Hawkins, a physician-recruiting company based in Irving, Texas. Hospitals and medical groups are offering more competitive salaries to attract physicians. Also, as the economy improves, however slightly, more patients are getting elective procedures they had put off over the past few years. Some of the major findings from Medscapes 2013 report: Orthopedic surgeons again topped the list as the highest earners, with a mean income of $405,000, followed by cardiologists ($357,000) and radiologists ($349,000). The lowest-earning specialists were similar to those in Medscapes survey report from last year: internists ($185,000), diabetes physicians/endocrinologists ($178,000), Continue reading >>

25 Top-earning Doctors In Illinois

25 Top-earning Doctors In Illinois

Every year, drug companies pay doctors tens of millions of dollars to speak about therapies for various medical conditions. Some doctors also serve as consultants and advisers to pharmaceutical firms. These payments exclude drug company funding for research, which can also be considerable. The Tribune asked 25 Illinois doctors and one nurse who received large sums from drug companies about these activities. Several declined requests for comment or did not respond to multiple attempts to reach them by phone, e-mail or letter. Many physicians were willing to talk, however. They said they appreciated the chance to teach colleagues about various illnesses and research supporting the use of medications. Compensation reflects the travel, preparation and time away from patients and family often involved in giving talks, doctors said. The payments listed below came from seven drug companies -- Eli Lilly and Co., Merck & Co. Inc. , GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer Inc. , AstraZeneca , Johnson & Johnson and Cephalon Inc. The information was compiled in a single database and made easily searchable by ProPublica, a national investigative news organization. Only these companies have disclosed the data so far; many others have not yet done so, making it impossible to know yet the full extent of drug company payments to physicians. ProPublica's database covers payments made between January 2009 and June 2010, though reporting periods vary by each company. Received $195,750 from GlaxoSmithKline between April 2009 and June 2010, $11,175 from Eli Lilly and Co. in 2009 and $3,166 from Pfizer Inc. in the second half of 2009. Former chair, department of urology, Northwest Community Hospital. Speaks primarily about Avodart, for enlarged prostates, and Vesicare (Glaxo), for overactive bladders. "When Continue reading >>

2016 Pharmacist Salary Guide

2016 Pharmacist Salary Guide

Alex Barker is the founder of The Happy PharmD, which helps pharmacists create an inspiring career, break free from the mundane "pill-flipping" life. He is a Full-time Pharmacist, Media Company founder, franchise owner, Business Coach, Speaker, and Author. He's also the Founder of Pharmacy School HQ, which helps students get into pharmacy school and become residents. It’s finally time for the 2016 Pharmacy Salary Guide. Before we dive into 2016 data, let’s revisit pharmacy salary information from 2015. In 2015, full-time pharmacists made between $90,000 and $140,000 a year, with the average annual salary coming in between $112,000 and $119,000, depending on the data source. Staff pharmacists at mail-order pharmacies were the lowest paid in 2015, earning an average wage of $56.69 per hour. Aside from team managers, clinical pharmacists were the highest paid, earning an average wage of $61.28 per hour. Overall, 37% of pharmacists reported earning between $61/hr and $70/hr. For the 2016 Pharmacist Salary Guide, I consulted a number of sources to try to give you a well-rounded picture of pharmacy salaries in the United States. The good news is that, no matter which source I consulted, a career as a pharmacist is still considered to be respected and stable with above-average income. PayScale.com Survey According to the results of a PayScale.com survey, pharmacists’ annual salaries fell between $84,000 and $134,000 in 2016. The current median annual salary is $108,267. Factors that influence a pharmacist’s salary include (in order of influence): Area of residence Specific employer Experience level According to PayScale.com, experience doesn’t seem to play a huge role in salary calculations: Average earnings with 0-5 years of experience: $108,000 Average earnings wit Continue reading >>

How Should Doctors Get Paid? Hourly Wage, Piecework Or Quality?

How Should Doctors Get Paid? Hourly Wage, Piecework Or Quality?

A long time ago, when I worked in Swedens Socialized health care system, there were no incentives to see more patients. In the hospital and in the outpatient offices there were scheduled coffee breaks at 10 and at 3 oclock, lunch was an hour, and everyone left on the dot at five.On-call work was reimbursed as time off. Any extra income would have been taxed at the prevailing marginal income tax rate of somewhere around 80%. There was, in my view, a culture of giving less than you were able to, a lack of urgency, and a patient-unfriendly set of barriers. One example: most clinics took phone calls only for an hour or two in the morning. After that, there was no patient access; no additions were made to providers schedules, even if some patients didnt keep their appointments, not that there was a way to call and make a same-day cancellation. As my father always said: There must be a reward for working. But, high productivity can sometimes mean churning out patient visits without accomplishing much, or it can mean providing unnecessary care just to increase revenue. For example, some of my patients who spend winters in warmer climates come back with tall tales of excessive testing while away . A recent Wall Street Journal article offers an interactive display of doctors who collect the highest Medicare payments. The difference between providers in the same specialties across the country makes interesting reading. It is hard to imagine that many individual doctors are billing Medicare more than $10,000,000 per year. So it might make sense to insure against paying for excessive care by also demanding a certain level of quality. But defining quality is fraught with scientific and ethical problems, since quality targets really arent, or shouldnt be, the same for all of our pat Continue reading >>

Rural Regions Pay Doctors More Than Urban Areas

Rural Regions Pay Doctors More Than Urban Areas

Rural Regions Pay Doctors More Than Urban Areas New research finds that doctors in rural areas such as the American West are paid more than physicians in highly competitive regions such as Boston or San Francisco. According to the San Francisco-based startup Doximity, a networking site for physicians, high-cost municipalities actually pay less in salary than rural areas of the country. Making that dream job at a prestigious medical center seem much less desirable. High-cost areas actually pay less, said Jeff Tangney, CEO and founder of Doximity. Medical school teaches the science of medicine, but not the business of medicine. According to Doximity research, physicians in rural regions make about $1,500 on average a year more than doctors in urban areas. We believe that the higher rural compensation is a result of more of a supply problem. The demand for doctors stays relatively consistent with population, with some exceptions, said Doximity spokeswoman Lauren Lloyd. However, in areas with a lower supply of physicians either due to the number of training programs or the desirability of the location, were seeing that those areas are paying higher wages to meet their demand. Emergency medicine, family medicine, occupational therapy, and psychiatry were the most sought-after specialties and paid more in Texas, Florida and Minnesota. Doctors in Massachusetts, New York, and California, however, reported the lowest salaries in those specialties. Essentially, the more in need a region is of a physician in a certain specialty, the higher the compensation. If another doctor in the same specialty moves to the region, salary tends to drop slightly. Our data does show that as you add more physicians per capita, you see a decrease in compensation. We also see that areas with high ph Continue reading >>

Obamacare Isn't Stopping Doctors' Incomes From Soaring

Obamacare Isn't Stopping Doctors' Incomes From Soaring

Obamacare Isn't Stopping Doctors' Incomes From Soaring Obamacare Isn't Stopping Doctors' Incomes From Soaring Dr. Jason Greenspan (L) and emergency room nurse Junizar Manansala care for a patient in the ER of Mission Community Hospital in Panorama City, California. Americas doctors are healthier than ever. Far from flattening, as some Obamacare experts predicted, or even waxing in low-single digits like salaries for contractors, lending officers, beauticians, and most other workers, pay for doctors is surging. Thats the conclusion of a comprehensive study just released by Merritt Hawkins , the nations leading physician recruiting firm. According to Merritt Hawkins, a division of AMN Healthcare Services (ahs) , Americas physicians have gotten a big, big raise, in the past yearjust about their fattest raise in recent history. This is especially relevant now because Hillary Clinton, who in 1993 waged a war on doctor pay, is getting closer to the White House. If shes elected president in November, its possible that Clinton will once again target rich physician comp that as the new statistics show, is only getting richer. Dermatologists, cardiologists, urologists, among others, are reaping double-digit increases that lift their salaries to the $500,000 a year range, and thats not including substantial performance and signing bonuses, relocation allowances, and even full payment of their med school loans. Keep in mind that doctors enjoy unrivaled job security. No physician in America is voluntarily unemployed, and doctors who want to change employers routinely choose from multiple offers. Hence, the idea that doctors are suffering financially from the revolution in health care delivery, or medical insurance reform, as well as new metrics designed to reward quality of care ra Continue reading >>

A Shortage Of Diabetes Doctors

A Shortage Of Diabetes Doctors

There are too few of the diabetes doctor specialists called endocrinologists Sarah Mart would like to see her endocrinologist every three months. Thats a tough thing to schedulebut not because Mart, the 41-year-old director of research at a nonprofit public health organization in Petaluma, Calif., is too busy. Its difficult to get an appointment with Marts endocrinologist and the other endos in the practice because they have too many patients and not enough open appointment times, says Mart, who has type 1 diabetes. Ive seen other endocrinologists in San Francisco and the Bay Area as well and its been that hard for all of them. According to a study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM), there were only 4,841 U.S. endocrinologists in adult practice in 2011. Endocrinologists are doctors who specialize in the endocrine system, the bodys glands and the hormones they produce (the pancreas is both a gland and an organ). Endocrinologists treat diabetes and other health issues, including thyroid diseases, metabolic bone disease such as osteoporosis, and sexual hormone irregularities. While the number of endocrinologists has increased since 1999 (when there were 3,623 adult-practice endocrinologists), there are not enough of them to meet the demand of the estimated 29 million people living with diabetes in this country, says Robert Vigersky, MD, director of the Diabetes Institute at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and chair of the technical expert panel of the Endocrinology Workforce Study. With diabetes cases rising, the limited number of diabetes doctors, and the Affordable Care Acts improved coverage for people with diabetes, more people than ever want to see an endocrinologistand the endocrinologists who are available Continue reading >>

Redwood City Opens Food Pharmacy For Low-income Diabetes Patients

Redwood City Opens Food Pharmacy For Low-income Diabetes Patients

Redwood City opens food pharmacy for low-income diabetes patients Homicide suspect in custody in Redwood City REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (KTVU) - A very different kind of pharmacy opened in Redwood City on Wednesday. It's called a food pharmacy and is designed to encourage low-income people suffering with diabetes, to eat a healthy diet. It's the first of its kind ever to open in California. One woman was seen filling a medical prescription with groceries. She has type II diabetes, often linked to diet. She spoke to us through an interpreter. "Before I used to do a lot of fried food, [a] lot of pizza and hamburgers. I don't do that anymore," said Rose Amezcua. Now at the food pharmacy, she can get healthier groceries. With a doctor's prescription, low-income diabetes patients can get food at this special pantry inside the Samaritan House Health Clinic , for free. The food is donated by the Second Harvest Food Bank, which says diabetes and other diseases run rampant among low-income people who often can't afford to eat healthier, or don't know how. "At Second Harvest, our clients have told us that one out of every three adults that we serve are suffering from diabetes. That's more than three times the national average. So it is a big problem among low-income communities," said Kathy Jackson, director of the food bank. "The only one who works is my husband. We pretty much live day by day with his salary," said Amezcua. The food pharmacy officially opened on Wednesday as a pilot program expecting to provide 100 diabetes patients with a ticket to healthier eating habits. The pharmacy is located in the same building as the medical clinic. "If they are running out of food at the end of the week they can get some food that is healthy for them rather than pick up something that is c Continue reading >>

Doctor Salaries: What They Earned In 2013

Doctor Salaries: What They Earned In 2013

Doctor Salaries: What They Earned in 2013 April 16, 2014 -- Medicine is going through changes, some for the better and others less so, according to Medscape's "Physician Compensation Report: 2014." Key findings include: Compensation has increased slightly in 19 medical specialties. The income gap between men and women is narrowing. Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are making their impact felt. Self-employed doctors earn more than employed ones. Cash-only practices, while still a tiny percentage of all practices, are gaining some traction. The report is based on a survey of more than 24,000 U.S. doctors representing 25 specialties. Orthopedics ($413,000), cardiology ($351,000), urology ($348,000), gastroenterology ($348,000), and radiology ($340,000) are the five top-earning specialties, as they were in last year's survey. Radiology has moved down slightly compared with earlier surveys, and anesthesiology has dropped. Compensation for both family doctors and internists is up 1% compared to 2012. While doctors overall have been concerned about income declines due to health care reform , this was not the case in 2013 for 19 specialties that saw modest increases. But inflation in 2013 was 1.5%, so for many, income did not keep up with inflation. For primary care, some of the increase was probably due to the 10% bonus paid to primary care doctors who see Medicare patients, as included in the Affordable Care Act . Despite the modest increase, family doctors and pediatricians are among the lowest-paid specialists, as they have been in past surveys. The Income Gap Between Male and Female Doctors Is Narrowing Among doctors, men earn more than women, as they have in all past surveys. But that picture appears to have improved. In 2010, male doctors earned 40% more than femal Continue reading >>

Fp Salaries Continue Upward Climb

Fp Salaries Continue Upward Climb

Family Physician Salaries Continue to Rise at Rapid Clip Survey Ranks Family Medicine as Most Recruited Specialty for 10th Year Running Family physicians continue to be in high demand among health care recruiters, and their salaries are rising to catch up to their worth, according to a recent survey. Average salaries for primary care and other specialties continue to climb, including a 13 percent year-over-year increase for family medicine, according to the 2016 survey report(www.merritthawkins.com) by Merritt Hawkins, a Dallas-based health care recruiting agency. The report showed family physicians now earn an average of $225,000 annually, with some earning as much as $340,000 per year. And for the 10th consecutive year, family physicians ranked first on the list of most-requested recruiting targets. The report, based on 3,342 recruiting assignments conducted from April 1, 2015, to March 31, 2016, tracked salaries as well as other incentives. "Demand for primary care physicians remains particularly strong, as they are seen as the keys to achieving quality and cost objectives necessary under emerging team and population health-based delivery models," the report stated. AAFP President Wanda Filer, M.D., M.B.A., of York, Pa., said the rising salaries are a byproduct of both the demand for more family physicians and the ongoing transition to a payment system based on value rather than volume. Filer told AAFP News that she often receives requests for referrals of job candidates. "I am happy to see salaries are going up," Filer said. "Physicians can say, 'At least financially I am better off than I was five years ago.'" Family medicine residents tell Filer that their email boxes are flooded with job offers. Some even report that recruiters track them down when they are cons Continue reading >>

Female Doctors Paid $20,000 Less Than Males On Average, Us Study Finds

Female Doctors Paid $20,000 Less Than Males On Average, Us Study Finds

Female doctors paid $20,000 less than males on average, US study finds Survey of pay for doctors working in US medical schools shows a gender gap that could see female doctors losing out by around $1 million by retirement age Last modified on Wed 20 Sep 2017 14.22EDT The study shows that female doctors earn, on average, around $50,000 a year less than male doctors, with the pay gap at nearly $20,000 after factors such as age, years of experience and specialty are taken into account.Photograph: Alamy Female doctors in the US are paid nearly $20,000 a year less than their male colleagues, even after factors such as age and years of experience are taken into account, according to a study of medical pay. The research looked at the gender pay gap among over 10,000 academic doctors working in publicly funded US medical schools across a wide range of specialties. The results show that female doctors earn, on average, around $50,000 a year less than male doctors, with the pay gap at nearly $20,000 after factors such as age, years of experience and specialty are taken into account. Although we were not surprised by the findings of our study, they are nonetheless deeply concerning, said Anupam B. Jena, first author of the research from Harvard Medical School. The fact that men and women in academic medicine who perform similar work are paid different amounts not only has implications for equity but for efficiency; i.e. how can we expect to continue to attract the most talented women into the field if we dont fix this issue? said Jena. Diana Lautenberger, director of women in medicine and science at the Association of American Medical Colleges said such salary analyses are important part of the discussion around gender equality. Based on these figures, a woman could be looking at Continue reading >>

Doctor Salaries Show Modest Rise, Report Says

Doctor Salaries Show Modest Rise, Report Says

Doctor Salaries Show Modest Rise, Report Says home >doctor salaries show modest rise, report says article April 12, 2018 -- Primary care and specialty doctors in the United States have seen a modest increase in earnings this year over last year, according to the Medscape Physician Compensation Report 2018. The increases reflect a continued rise in doctors' income over the past 7 years. While there are many reasons involved, the main one comes down to the basic rules of economics. "The fact remains that the physician workforce is relatively stagnant in terms of growth and that demand for physician services keeps rising. The result, inevitably, is more spending and higher incomes for physicians," said Tommy Bohannon, vice president of Merritt Hawkins, a doctor recruiting firm. The overall average doctor salary -- including primary care and specialties -- sits at $299,000. The average salary for primary care doctors is $223,000, compared with $217,000 in 2017. For specialists, it's $329,000 this year, compared with $316,000 last year. Top-earning specialties with the highest average salary include: Psychiatrists are seeing the biggest gains in compensation this year (+16%). "We have never seen demand for psychiatrists this high in our 30-year history," said Bohannon. "Demand for mental health services has exploded, while the number of psychiatrists has not kept pace. The short version is that aging produces many mental health challenges, including dementia and its associated pathologies, and that societal ills, such as the opioid crisis, are driving the need for more mental health professionals." Other specialists who've gotten notable boosts in pay are plastic surgeons (+14%), physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists (+13%), oncologists (+10%), and rheumatologist Continue reading >>

How Much Money Do U.s. Doctors Make Per Year?

How Much Money Do U.s. Doctors Make Per Year?

For the 2016 Medscape Physician Compensation Report, physicians were asked to provide their annual compensation for patient care including salary, bonus, and profit sharing if employed, earnings after taxes, and deductible business expenses (but before income tax) if in private practice. Here is what they found. Who earns the most? Orthopedic surgeons are the top earners in the 2016 survey, coming in at $443,000 up from $421,000 in last year’s survey—I guess all that unnecessary back surgery really pays off. (Just kidding! Or not!). Cardiologists came in 2nd place earning $410,000 per year (up from $376,000 last year). Plastic surgeons come in 8th from the top (down from 5th place last year) at $355,000—essentially unchanged from 2015. This is pretty interesting, considering a large percentage of cosmetic surgery is paid for out-of-pocket. Could it be that people are opting for fillers instead of facelifts? At the low end of the totem pole are the primary care docs, you know the ones we need a whole lot more of. Pediatricians’ average compensation is $204,000 (up from $189,000 last year), family physicians $207,000 (up from 195,000), and internists $222,000 compared with $196,000 last year. The specialists who take care of some of the most numerous and complex patients in the country, the diabetes doctors and endocrinologists, are also down at the bottom at $206,000 (up from $196,000). When comparing 2016 to the prior year, it appears most docs got a raise, but two specialties—allergy and pulmonology—experienced a significant decline and two specialties’—plastic surgery and pathology—incomes were flat. Although all of the categories of primary care (pediatricians, family docs, internists) earn more this year compared to last—internists by 12%—it di Continue reading >>

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