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Diabetes Diet Elderly

Warning: If You’re Diabetic And Over 75, Your Doctor Could Be Over-treating You—here’s How

Warning: If You’re Diabetic And Over 75, Your Doctor Could Be Over-treating You—here’s How

Although staying on top of treatment is vital for diabetics, there comes a time when it can be a hindrance. Everyone with a diagnosis should know the key facts about diabetes—here are the silent signs of diabetes you might be missing. Now, researchers from Duke University, the University of Michigan, and VA hospitals from North Carolina and Michigan say that over-treatment of elderly diabetics may actually put them in danger. As reported on EurekaAlert.org, a new study finds that taking too much medication can cause seniors to experience hypoglycemia. As blood sugar levels fall it can trigger dizziness and disorientation. These symptoms aren’t often recognized by older people as a threat until it’s too late, and falling remains the biggest risk to America’s senior population over the age of 65 years old—and it’s the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries according to the National Council on Aging (NCOA). (Here are some more ways to manage low blood sugar.) In the study, researchers reviewed the records of 78,000 diabetics, 75 years or older. They found that about 1 in 10 had very low blood sugar levels, suggesting they were being over-treated. Doctors were most likely to over-treat patients with type 2 diabetes who were covered by Medicare and Medicaid insurance. Even more problematic: During the six months of the study, only 14 percent of the patients had their blood sugar medication adjusted to address their low-blood sugar. The researchers don’t blame doctors, whom they say are focusing on the long-term management of the disease in their patients to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attacks brought on by too-high sugar levels. However, the advantages can be outweighed by the disadvantages once patients get older: After age 70, the risk of harm f Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older Adults

Diabetes In Older Adults

What is the epidemiology and pathogenesis of diabetes in older adults? According to the most recent surveillance data, the prevalence of diabetes among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years varies from 22 to 33%, Continue reading >>

Basic Foods For Elderly Diabetes Patients

Basic Foods For Elderly Diabetes Patients

By the year 2025, two-thirds of the people who have diabetes will be age 60 or older, reports a 2009 article in the "International Journal of Diabetes Mellitus." Along with this medical condition, older diabetics are more likely to have hypertension, cardiovascular disease or dyslipidemia as well. These diseases, along with other factors such as appetite and mobility, can affect the nutrition of an elderly diabetes patient. But there’s no one right list of foods for everyone, so speak with your doctor or a dietitian to determine which diet is best for you. Video of the Day Although there’s no one-size-fits-all diet, the University of Maryland Medical Center recommends a general breakdown of macronutrients for a diabetic. Around 45 percent to 65 percent of total daily calories should come from carbohydrates, but not just any old carbohydrate -- the best options are high in fiber. Another 25 percent to 35 percent of daily calories can come from fat, mostly of the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated variety. The remainder of calories should come from protein, though the medical center is careful to note that this can vary based on a person’s health requirements. For example, a diabetic who’s also struggling with kidney disease will need to keep his protein intake to about 10 percent. Within these three groups, certain foods will help manage your diabetes better than others. Carbohydrates have the biggest impact on your blood sugar, making it the most influential macronutrient when it comes to controlling diabetes. All diabetics should eat at least 130 grams of carbohydrates a day, says the University of Maryland Medical Center. The American Diabetes Association recommends choosing whole grains and nutrient-rich starchy vegetables for your carbohydrates. Basic whole Continue reading >>

9 Ways Older People Can Manage Their Diabetes To Stay Healthier

9 Ways Older People Can Manage Their Diabetes To Stay Healthier

Diabetes is often a life-long condition and requires careful treatment. By sticking to your meal plan changes, exercise, and medication plan, you can live a long and healthy life. To help older people with diabetes to stay health and active are the following tips. Eat Healthy All people with diabetes should eat a healthy diet that is low in sugar (including sugar from fruit) and saturated fats. It may help to see a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who is a diabetes educator to help you create a healthy meal plan. Medicare will cover the visits every year so you would not have to pay out of pocket for the visit. Stay Active Aerobic exercise such as walking, swimming, and bicycling can help you control your glucose level, manage your weight, and stay strong. The American Diabetes Association recommends exercising 30 minutes each day, at least 5 days a week. You can split up the exercise into 10-minutes of activity 3 times a day. In addition, do strength training such as free weights, resistance bands, or yoga, at least 2 times per week. Strength training builds muscle and helps control glucose levels. Talk to your healthcare professional to see what exercises are right for you. Check Glucose Levels Regularly Your healthcare professional will tell you how and when to check your blood glucose level. In general, people taking insulin, those who are having a hard time controlling blood glucose levels, or have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) need to monitor their blood glucose levels regularly. Older people with diabetes are at higher risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when taking diabetes medications, making it especially important to check your glucose levels. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include confusion, dizziness, hunger, and sweating. If you or a loved one with di Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older People

Diabetes In Older People

On this page: Diabetes is a serious disease. People get diabetes when their blood glucose level, sometimes called blood sugar, is too high. The good news is that there are things you can do to take control of diabetes and prevent its problems. And, if you are worried about getting diabetes, there are things you can do to lower your risk. What Is Diabetes? Our bodies turn the food we eat into glucose. Insulin helps glucose get into our cells, where it can be used to make energy. If you have diabetes, your body may not make enough insulin, may not use insulin in the right way, or both. That can cause too much glucose in the blood. Your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in taking care of people with diabetes, called an endocrinologist. Types of Diabetes There are two main kinds of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. Although adults can develop this type of diabetes, it occurs most often in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin but doesn’t use it the right way. It is the most common kind of diabetes. It occurs most often in middle-aged and older adults, but it can also affect children. Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes is higher if you are overweight, inactive, or have a family history of diabetes. Diabetes can affect many parts of your body. It’s important to keep diabetes under control. Over time, it can cause serious health problems like heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and circulation problems that may lead to amputation. People with type 2 diabetes also have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease. What Is Prediabetes? Many people have “prediabetes.” This means their glucose levels are higher than normal but Continue reading >>

Seniors With Diabetes Take Control Of Your Health

Seniors With Diabetes Take Control Of Your Health

Seniors with Diabetes Take Control of Your Health Posted on September 6, 2013 by American Diabetes Association In the U.S., there are nearly 26 million people living with diabetes, and more seniors have diabetes than any other age group. Currently, one in four Americans (10.9 million, or 26.9 percent) over the age of 60 is living with diabetes. With age comes an increased risk for specific complications that require diligence and care to properly mitigate them. This presents a great opportunity to further educate seniors and, in some cases, provide information to their caregivers. The majority of seniors with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. It occurs because the body is not making enough insulin or is not able to properly use the insulin it does make. Insulin helps our bodies use glucose for energy. When you were diagnosed with diabetes, your blood glucose level was too high. This sugar is not so sweetdiabetes is a serious disease that can cause complications such as blindness, kidney disease and heart disease, plus nerve damage that can lead to amputations. The good news is that there are things you can do to prevent these diabetes-related problems, no matter your age. Taking action now will help with your later years, so you can live a healthy life and see your grandchildren grow into beautiful and healthy men and women. And, its the perfect time to think about this because National Grandparents Day is on Sunday. Ways you can take control of your health include: Keep your blood glucose level under control. Talk to your doctor about the target range for your blood glucose . Then check your levels daily (or as often as recommended by your doctor) to know if your treatment plan (nutrition plan, exercise and/or medication(s)) is working. Make changes in your diet to lower Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Elderly

Type 2 Diabetes And The Elderly

One out of four Americans who are 65 or older have type 2 diabetes. Serious complications such as hearing loss, vision problems, cognitive impairment, and mobility difficulties are especially apparent in seniors whose diabetes isn’t properly managed, but even people who control their blood sugar well are at risk. “As a person gets older, we want to intervene to prevent complications and the deterioration of the organs involved,” said Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore MedicaL Center in New York City. “Most of these are caused by high blood sugar.” The following are some of the most common complications seniors with diabetes face, and what can be done to prevent them or slow their progress. Vision problems “With vision, you have the natural aging of a person’s vision in addition to the impact of the visual changes of diabetes,” said Margery Kirsch, a diabetes clinical nurse specialist with Partners in Care, an affiliate of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. Prolonged high blood sugar can damage the blood vessels of the retina, causing them to break and leak blood into the eye which can cloud or obscure vision. High blood pressure, which affects about 60 percent of diabetic patients, is another risk factor. This condition, known as diabetic retinopathy, is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. If caught early enough, it may be treatable with laser surgery. The surgery is not a cure-all, however, as retinopathy can reoccur, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar levels. Dr. Zonszein stresses the importance of having A1C glucose levels (your average glucose level over the last two to three months) checked regularly. Since it can take years for high blood sugar to trigger diabetic retinopathy, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets For Frail Elderly Long-term Care Residents With Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Guidelines

Diabetic Diets For Frail Elderly Long-term Care Residents With Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Guidelines

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. Diabetic Diets for Frail Elderly Long-Term Care Residents with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Guidelines Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal Copyright 2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Except where otherwise noted, this work is distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial- NoDerivatives 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND), a copy of which is available at Copyright: This report contains CADTH copyright material. It may be copied and used for non-commercial purposes, provided that attribution is given to CADTH. Links: This report may contain links to other information available on the websites of third parties on the Internet. CADTH does not have control over the content of such sites. Use of third party sites is governed by the owners own terms and conditions. People with type 2 diabetes , also known as non- insulin -dependent diabetes or adult onset diabetes, produce less insulin and are often overweight . The prevalence of type 2 diabetes increases with age as more people live longer. The prevalence of diabetes among Canadian seniors was 21.3% between 2006 and 2007. In the US, one in three residents of long-term care facilities have diabetes, of which 95% are type 2 diabetes. Older people with diabetes are at an increased risk for urinary tract infections , skin infections , foot ulcers , and pneumonia or flu . Treatment goals vary depending on the overall health of the residents. Usual goals for non-institutionalized adults include HbA1c <7.0%, before meal blood glucose levels 70130 mg/dl, after meal (2 hours) blood glucose levels <180 mg/dl, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL cholestero Continue reading >>

Nutritional Challenges In The Elderly With Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Nutritional Challenges In The Elderly With Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Volume 1, Issue 1 , April 2009, Pages 26-31 Nutritional challenges in the elderly with diabetes Author links open overlay panel Ali A.Rizvi Adults age 60 and older will comprise two-thirds of the diabetic population by the year 2025. Older patients with diabetes are more likely to have coexistent chronic conditions like hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease that may impact their nutritional requirements. The issue of attainment and maintenance of an optimal body weight in elderly diabetic persons may not be as straightforward as in other age groups, and the risk-benefit ratio may be different as well. Although increased prevalence of overweight and obesity in the elderly contributes to insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, older inhabitants of long-term care facilities who suffer from diabetes tend to be underweight. Both may signify inadequate nutritional status and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The attendant problems of appetite changes, palatability of food, dietary restrictions, loneliness, and depression may affect the type and quantity of food consumed by elderly persons. Structured screening tools may identify nutrition-related issues that warrant evidence-based interventions. Although glucose control and health concerns are important factors in diet modification in the older population, other considerations include quality of life and individual preferences. Customizing of nutritional guidelines to the needs of the older diabetic patient makes sense. Continue reading >>

The Elderly And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

The Elderly And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to the American Diabetes Association, as we get older, our chances of getting Type 2 diabetes increases. They claim that one in four Americans over the age of 60 has diabetes.1 Carolyn contacted The Diabetes Council… When Carolyn contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned about her mother who is elderly and is living with diabetes. She didn’t know much about her medications, or how they might interact with her other medications. She was worried that her mother’s low blood sugar while she was home alone may be related to her worsening memory. In addition to referring Carolyn to a local Certified Diabetes Educator, we, at TheDiabetesCouncil, decided to write a guide for the elderly with diabetes that people like Carolyn could refer to. In the following article we will explore many different guidelines and recommendations, along with nutritional, activity, pharmaceutical, and financial and estate planning considerations. Those are just a few of the issues that we will touch on related to the elderly with diabetes. So let’s get started with some general and medication considerations first… General guidelines for the elderly with diabetes The following are some general guidelines to consider when treating the elderly with diabetes: Recommendation for the Eldery with Diabetes Depression screening in the elderly population with diabetes is of great importance, as elderly patients with diabetes experience more isolation, less support, and more feeling of hopelessness Avoiding low blood sugar is of paramount importance, and A1C and blood sugar goals should be adjusted, along with careful pharmaceutical management The elderly with diabetes who are capable of activities of daily living without assistance, and who have no cognitive impairment should have A1 Continue reading >>

Elderly Nutrition | Diabetic Diet | Osteoporosis Diet

Elderly Nutrition | Diabetic Diet | Osteoporosis Diet

Articles Library Nutrition Necessities Eating can be one of the most pleasurable and sociable parts of the day for seniors, or it can be frustrating and unfulfilling. Even the most active people slow down as they age and can develop food allergies and other difficulties with eating. But the bottom line is: along with exercise, healthy eating is vital for all of us, especially as we age. If you want to try to counteract the sodium level in your body the natural way, eat more foods that contain potassium, like leafy green vegetables, bananas, and root vegetables like potatoes. Dont worry, healthy foods are readily available, and finding and preparing them is not rocket science! Take note of the following tips for eating well as we age* (recommended amounts in parentheses are per day): Whole grains eat the whole thing! (approximately 5 to 10 ounces = one roll, slice of bread, small muffin, cup cooked rice or pasta, or one cup of ready-to-eat cereal). Remember to look for "whole grains" and avoid added refined sugars and corn syrup. Vary vegetables (2 to 3- cups). Choose a variety of colors and types of vegetables. Some of the best vegetables include green, leafy lettuces such as spinach, arugula and baby greens, green beans, yellow squash, red, yellow, and orange peppers, cucumbers, or broccoli. Often vegetables are pre-cut for easy eating vegetables dont have to be a chore! Dont forget the dairy (equivalent of 3 cups of milk). 1 cup of yogurt, 1- to 2 ounces of cheese, and 2 cups of cottage cheese all equal 1 cup of milk. If your parent is lactose intolerant, then look for lactose-free choices or soy milk, available in most supermarkets. Proteins pump you up: meat, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts (5 to 7 ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish). 1 cup of cooked beans or Continue reading >>

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Basic Diabetes Meal Plan

Diabetes meal planning starts with eating a well-balanced diet that includes carbohydrates (carbs), protein, and fat. Carbs (found in starches, fruit, vegetables, milk/yogurt and sweets) turn into sugar (glucose) in the body. The body needs carbs for energy. Eating too many carbs can raise blood glucose levels too much, but it is important not cut out these foods. Eating too few carbs may cause your blood glucose to go too low. Eating a moderate amount of carbs at each meal, with a balanced intake of protein and fat, will help your blood glucose stay in a healthy range. Here are some tips to get you started. Your dietitian will give you more specific information when you meet with him or her. Limit your intake and portion sizes of high-sugar foods to 2 or 3 times a week or less. These include: Cakes (frosted, layer, plain), pies, and cookies Candy (hard tack, chocolate, nougats, etc.) Jelly, jam, and preserves Table sugar, honey, molasses, and syrup Regular ice cream, sherbet, regular and frozen yogurt, fruit ices, and Popsicles Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Sugar coated cereals, granola, breakfast/snack bars Canned fruits with heavy syrup, dried fruit, fruit roll-ups, candied fruit Iced sweet breads, coffee cakes, breakfast rolls, and donuts Avoid the following: Table sugar, honey, molasses and syrup Regular soft drinks, fruit drinks (canned or concentrated), and drink mixes with sugar added Milkshakes, chocolate milk, hot cocoa mix Canned fruits with heavy syrup Eat 3 well-balanced meals a day and a small snack at night. Each meal should contain both carbs and protein. When planning meals, select a variety of foods from each food group, and watch your portion sizes Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Diet For An Elderly Diabetic

Diet For An Elderly Diabetic

Diabetes Diet and Nutrition Health and Nutrition Physical Wellbeing A diet plan is an essential part of any diabetics treatment. As we found out in our previous interview with Dr. Anoop Amarnath, Consultant Geriatrician at Apollo Hospitals, diabetes can be life threatening if not well-managed. Hence we decode the dynamics of a diabetics diet in this interview with Dr. Priyanka Rohtagi, Chief Clinical Nutritionist, Apollo Hospitals. Flaxseeds are good for diabetics. Pic: Silvertalkies Why is diet an essential part of a diabetics treatment plan? A diabetic diet is a healthy meal plan where the importance of small and frequent meals, with a good mix of carbohydrates, protein and fats is essential. It needs to be low on glycemic index and should have a good distribution of carbohydrates. How does a diet plan help? Can it reverse diabetes or only control and prevent? A diet plan helps prevent malnutrition and adds to the quality of life.Though diabetes cant be cured, it can be kept well within control thereby making it possible for the patients to carry on with minimal medication and regular monitoring. Would a diet plan for an elderly and a young diabetic vary? If yes, how? Elderly need to be more careful as they are vulnerable to fall into the trap of malnutrition.With decreased metabolism, peristalsis and absorption, it is essential to get a customised plan based on ones biochemical and physical parameters. On what basis is a diet plan charted out for a diabetic patient? (Any considerations like BMI, gender etc.?) Diet plan is made considering ones body weight, height, BMI, activity levels, age, gender, physiological state, disease history and biochemical values. Any thumb rules or tips for a diabetics diet? Staying hydrated is important for a diabetic. Pic credit: Wikim Continue reading >>

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Medical nutrition therapy is an integral component of diabetes management and of diabetes self-management education. Yet many misconceptions exist concerning nutrition and diabetes. Moreover, in clinical practice, nutrition recommendations that have little or no supporting evidence have been and are still being given to persons with diabetes. Accordingly, this position statement provides evidence-based principles and recommendations for diabetes medical nutrition therapy. The rationale for this position statement is discussed in the American Diabetes Association technical review “Evidence-Based Nutrition Principles and Recommendations for the Treatment and Prevention of Diabetes and Related Complications,” which discusses in detail the published research for each principle and recommendation (1). Historically, nutrition recommendations for diabetes and related complications were based on scientific knowledge, clinical experience, and expert consensus; however, it was often difficult to discern the level of evidence used to construct the recommendations. To address this problem, the 2002 technical review (1) and this position statement provide principles and recommendations classified according to the level of evidence available using the American Diabetes Association evidence grading system. However, the best available evidence must still take into account individual circumstances, preferences, and cultural and ethnic preferences, and the person with diabetes should be involved in the decision-making process. The goal of evidence-based recommendations is to improve diabetes care by increasing the awareness of clinicians and persons with diabetes about beneficial nutrition therapies. Because of the complexity of nutrition issues, it is recommended that a registered d Continue reading >>

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