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Diabetes Cured In Mice

Scientists Just Cured Diabetes In Mice

Scientists Just Cured Diabetes In Mice

As per Center for Disease Control, 1.25 million people are suffering from type 1 diabetes in the USA. It is managed by taking prescribed food and a regular dose of insulin but scientists at UT Health San Antonio have successfully invented a way to cure the disease in mice. People are hoping that this might be able to do for humans as well with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a particularly unpleasant condition in which pancreas stops the production of insulin required by the body to metabolize sugar until and unless injected with artificial insulin. Type 1 diabetes is as deadly as cancer. Type 2 is a comparatively less severe form of diabetes than type 1. In this form, the pancreas produces insulin but it is insufficient for the body. However, it can often be managed and controlled through diet. Diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The insulin production in the body is done by specialized cells in the pancreas called the beta cells. Sometimes, the bodys immune system turns against itself and destroys those beta cells, hence resulting in diabetes type 1. Diabetes results when the destruction of the beta cells is over 80 percent. Bruno Doiron and Ralph DeFronzo, the UT Health technique uses gene transfer to alter the cell chemistry in the pancreas of the mice to make them think they are beta cells and start producing insulin. The procedure involves taking selected genes from external beta cells and using viruses as carriers to move them into the new host cells in the diabetic pancreas. DeFronzo said that the altered cells then produce insulin but only in the presence of sugar. This is exactly how a functioning beta cell is supposed to work. Otherwise, the cells would just keep cranking out the hormone and metabolize all of the sugar in the blood causing hypoglycaemia. Continue reading >>

Mice Cured Of Diabetes By Cells Grown Inside Rats — Are Humans Next?

Mice Cured Of Diabetes By Cells Grown Inside Rats — Are Humans Next?

Tomoyuki Yamaguchi It’s possible to grow organs of one species inside an animal of another species and then transplant that organ to cure disease, according to a study published today in Nature. In this case, mouse pancreas cells were grown in rats, then transplanted into mice to reverse diabetes. The new research opens the possibility of one day creating human organs inside animals like pigs or sheep that could then be transplanted back into needy patients. To create the mouse pancreases, scientists first genetically engineered rats to lack a gene that’s key to developing the organ. These engineered rat embryos were then injected with mouse stem cells that can develop into any tissue or organ in the body. When the embryos grew into rats, the animals had a pancreas made up almost entirely of mouse cells. The scientists then removed the pancreas, isolated clusters of insulin-producing cells, and transplanted them into diabetic mice. The results were surprising, lead author Hiromitsu Nakauchi of Stanford University School of Medicine wrote in an email to The Verge. The transplanted cells reversed the mice’s diabetes and kept sugar levels down for one year. The mice didn’t reject the cells, even if they were given anti-rejection medication for only five days after the transplant. Much more research needs to be done to make these functional interspecies organs a reality for people, including research into the ethics of this idea. But today’s study is “a remarkable scientific achievement,” Timothy Kieffer, a professor of cellular and physiological sciences and surgery at the University of British Columbia, who didn’t work on the study, wrote in an email to The Verge. And its implications for the future are enormous. There are about 120,000 Americans who are c Continue reading >>

Researchers Cure Diabetes In Mice Without Side Effects

Researchers Cure Diabetes In Mice Without Side Effects

May 5 (UPI) -- Researchers at the University of Texas Health San Antonio report they have essentially cured type 1 diabetes in laboratory mice by using gene transfer. The discovery increases the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin, which represents a potential cure for type 1 diabetes and could end insulin dependence in type 2 diabetes. Insulin used by the body to lower blood sugar is only made by beta cells. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys beta cells resulting in the body producing no insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells fail and insulin decreases but is still produced by the body. Researchers at UT Health San Antonio received a U.S. patent in January on the technique and plan to begin commercialization in the future. The technique, known as gene transfer, involves using a virus as a vector to carry selected genes into the pancreas, which then are incorporated and cause digestive system and other cell types to make insulin. Gene transfer using a viral vector is a process that has been approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, to treat various diseases. "The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar]," Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Diabetes at UT Health, said in a press release. "This is basically just like beta cells." In type 1 diabetes, the body rejects beta cells, however, other cell populations in the pancreas co-exist with the body's immune defenses. "If a type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we're getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response," DeFronz Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Cured In Mice Using Gene Therapy

Type 1 Diabetes Cured In Mice Using Gene Therapy

Researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio have found a way to cure type 1 diabetes in mice. It is hoped that the novel technique - which boosts insulin secretion in the pancreas - will reach human clinical trials in the next 3 years. Study co-author Dr. Bruno Doiron, Ph.D., of the Division of Diabetes, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology. Type 1 diabetes is estimated to affect around 1.25 million children and adults in the United States. Onset of the condition is most common in childhood, but it can arise at any age. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Insulin is the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. As a result, blood glucose levels become too high. There is currently no cure for type 1 diabetes; the condition is managed through diet and insulin therapy. However, in recent years, researchers have investigated replacing beta cells as a means of eradicating type 1 diabetes once and for all. Dr. Doiron and colleagues have taken a different approach with their new study. The team reveals how they used a method called gene transfer to coax other pancreatic cells into producing insulin. Using this technique, the researchers have managed to cure type 1 diabetes in mice, bringing us one step closer to curing the condition in humans. Gene transfer method led to long-term insulin secretion in mice The gene transfer technique - called Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing - involves introducing specific genes into the pancreas using a virus as a vector. The team notes that beta cells are rejected in patients with type 1 diabetes. With the gene transfer method, the newly introduced genes encourage non- Continue reading >>

Sa Researchers Discover Type 1 Diabetes Cure In Mice

Sa Researchers Discover Type 1 Diabetes Cure In Mice

SAN ANTONIO - A pair of researchers at UT Health San Antonio have come up with a cure for Type 1 diabetes in mice and may have found a way to eliminate the need for insulin shots for Type 2 diabetics. "Of course it's a big step, from mice to man, but if we could achieve this, it would actually be a cure for Type 1 diabetes," said Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, professor of medicine and chief of the Diabetes Division at UT Health San Antonio. "For people with Type 2 diabetes, they wouldn't have to take insulin shots anymore." DeFronzo and Dr. Bruno Doiron, assistant professor of medicine in the Diabetes Division at UT Health San Antonio, made the discovery by using a cocktail of molecules to trick the pancreas into producing more vital insulin. "We can now use your own body to create the medicine, and that's a revolution for the future," Doiron said. The major breakthrough is very exciting news for Ellie Lopez, who has been battling Type 1 diabetes for 14 years. Lopez said she constantly struggles with glucose levels. "You also have to figure out how much exercise you do, or what you are doing that day because it all eats up sugar, too," she said. "So if you take too much medicine, you'll have a low, and that's probably the worst feeling in the world. It's almost like you have to be a mathematician to figure out the right numbers all the time. It's a constant battle." Lopez hopes that one day, DeFronzo's and Doiron's breakthrough will come true for humans. -------------------------------------------------------- Don't miss a thing. Get email alerts from KSAT12 today. Get alerted to news events as they happen or sign up for a scheduled news headline email that is delivered right to your inbox. Breaking news, severe weather, daily forecasts, entertainment news, all of the day’s imp Continue reading >>

Scientists Have Cured Diabetes In Mice, Marking A Major Breakthrough In Tackling The Disease

Scientists Have Cured Diabetes In Mice, Marking A Major Breakthrough In Tackling The Disease

Unable to playback video Scientists in the United States announced the breakthrough, which uses a novel approach that may eliminate Type 1 diabetes and see painful insulin injections become a thing of the past. University of Texas Health Science Centre doctors used a virus as a carrier to introduce insulin-producing genes into the pancreas of rodent subjects. Professor Ralph DeFronzo said researchers altered cells so they secreted insulin, but only in response to glucose — mimicking the behaviour of the body’s beta cells. Source:Supplied This study bypasses the autoimmune system by altering other pancreatic cells so they can coexist with immune defences — unlike beta cells, which are rejected in Type 1 patients. At the moment, Type 1 diabetes is treated by monitoring glucose levels and injecting artificial insulin up to four times a day. While technology has made management of the condition easier, a cure has been elusive — until now. The patent’s co-inventor Professor Bruno Doiron said the results had never been seen before. “It worked perfectly,” Dr Doiron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects.” Dr Doiron predicted the same low-risk response in humans. “If a Type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we’re getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response.” Dr DeFronzo said the same method of treatment has been approved almost 50 times by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat various conditions, including rare childhood diseases. While it’s early days, the potential applications are promising and the researchers will now conduct a study on larger animals before any move to human trials. Source:News Limited Type 2 diabetes is the fastest-gro Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Cure In Mice

A Diabetes Cure In Mice

A generic blood pressure medicine healed beta cells, curing diabetes in mice. Scientists are now recruiting for a human study to see if it works in people. It might heal both Type 1 and Type 2. The drug is called verapamil . It costs $4 a month at Walmart. It has been used for high blood pressure, migraine headaches, and irregular heartbeats for decades, but it turns out to have a side effect. It lowers levels of a protein called TXNIP . TXNIP (stands for thioredoxin interacting protein) inhibits the antioxidant thioredoxin and suppresses tumors. But too-high levels of the substance in insulin-producing beta cells leads to their destruction. Apparently verapamil lowers the level of TXNIP. According to Medical News Today, In mice with established diabetes and blood sugars over 300 mg/dl [very high], verapamil eradicated the disease. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), led by Dr. Anath Shalev, have been working on this research for over ten years. They studied beta cells in test tubes to find what made them die. They eventually found excess TXNIP killed the cells. Then they tried a series of chemicals on the cells to look for one that lowered TXNIP. This is the way science was done in the old days, more driven by results than profit. These days, most researchers would have tried to create a new molecule from scratch to block TXNIP. This would be a fabulously expensive process. Instead, Shalevs team tested existing molecules to find one that worked. Now, the UAB researchers have received a three-year, $2.1 million grant from JDRF to conduct a clinical trial in 2015 in humans. JDRF focuses on Type 1 (formerly called juvenile-onset) diabetes. JDRF sponsorship may be why the study is enrolling only newly diagnosed people with Type 1. But it seems li Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cured In Mice. Are We Next?

Diabetes Cured In Mice. Are We Next?

2 pictures According to the Center for Disease Control, 1.25 million people suffer from type 1 diabetes in the US alone. So far, it can only be managed with diet and regular doses of insulin, but scientists at UT Health San Antonio have invented a way of curing the disease in mice that may one day do the same for humans even with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a particularly unpleasant condition. It occurs when the pancreas ceases to produce the insulin needed by the body to metabolize sugar and, until the invention of artificial insulin injections, it was as deadly as cancer. Type 2 is the less severe form of the disease, where the body produces insufficient insulin; it can often be managed through diet alone. Add some color to your diet with this recipe for rainbow sheet pan veggies, using Eggland’s Bes... Surprisingly, diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Insulin is made by specialized cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, and sometimes the body's immune system turns against itself and attacks these beta cells, destroying them. Diabetes results when this destruction is over 80 percent. Invented by Bruno Doiron and Ralph DeFronzo, the UT Health technique uses gene transfer to alter cells in the pancreases of mice to make them think they're beta cells and start making insulin. This involves taking selected genes from external beta cells and using viruses as carriers to move them into the new host cells, in the diabetic pancreas. According to DeFronzo, the altered cells then produce insulin, but only in the presence of sugar, which is how a functioning beta cell is supposed to work. Otherwise, the cells would just keep cranking out the hormone, metabolizing all the sugar in the bloodstream and causing hypoglycemia. Only about 20 percent of the lost cells need t Continue reading >>

Gene Transfer Technology Cures Diabetes In Mice

Gene Transfer Technology Cures Diabetes In Mice

Gene Transfer Technology Cures Diabetes In Mice Researchers report they have essentially cured type 1 diabetes in laboratory mice by using gene transfer.The discovery, from the University of Texas Health San Antonio, increases the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin.According to UPI, it represents a potential cure for type 1 diabetes. It could also end insulin dependence in type 2 diabetes.The body uses insulin to lower blood sugar. Insulin is only made by beta cells.In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys beta cells. Media: WochIt Media Anderson Cooper: Trump's Fox Interview 'Like Listening To The Ramblings Of Richard Nixon' Buzz 60 House Intelligence Committee Releases Redacted Russia Report, Finds 'No Evidence' of Collusion Buzz 60 East Area Rapist's decade-long spree San Francisco Chronicle Why Robots Are Still No Match For Speedy Creatures Like Fleas GeoBeats Trump On James Comey: 'He's Either Very Sick Or Very Dumb' Veuer Alameda D.A. Nancy O'Malley's involvement in Golden State Killer case goes back decades KTVU 1977 recording of suspected East Area Rapist FBI The pros and cons of electric scooters in San Francisco Alix Martichoux / SFGATE Middle School Students Get Sick From Fake 'Marijuana Laced Cheetos' Buzz 60 Continue reading >>

Gene Therapy Cures Diabetes In Mice

Gene Therapy Cures Diabetes In Mice

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Scientists said today theyhave used a new type of gene therapy to cure diabetes in miceand rats that could pave the way for new treatments formillions of people with the disease. Diabetes is a chronic condition in which sufferers produce little or no insulin, ahormone that regulates blood-sugar levels, and must rely on astrict diet or intravenous injection to control the disorder. But researchers at Yonsei University in South Korea and theUniversity of Calgary in Canada have developed a technique todeliver an altered human insulin gene into mice and ratssuffering from type 1 diabetes. Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, develops in childhood or early adulthood and was formerly known as juvenile diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. This new gene therapy may have potential therapeutic valuefor the cure of autoimmune diabetes in humans, Ji-Won Yoon, ofthe University of Calgary, and his colleagues said in a reportin the science journal Nature. People with type 1 diabetes produce no insulin becausetheir body destroys the insulin-secreting beta cells in thepancreas. The scientists delivered the altered insulin gene into thediabetic rodents with a modified virus injected into theanimals. After the animals were treated, the altered gene kept theanimals blood sugar at normal levels during the eight-monthstudy. Although the results are encouraging, Jerrold Olefsky of theUniversity of California in San Diego said it is still a hugeleap from treating animals to humans. Rodents are quite different from humans with respect tomaintaining glucose [sugar] levels, and extending these resultsto human physiology may prove a challenge, he said in acommentary in Nature. One of the biggest Continue reading >>

Research Mice And A Diabetes 'cure' | Ask D'mine

Research Mice And A Diabetes 'cure' | Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Happy Saturday! Welcome toAsk D'Mine, our weekly advice column hosted by veteran type 1 and diabetes author W il Dubois in New Mexico, who happens to have experience as a clinical diabetes specialist. This week, Wil looks at diabetes research and those lil' lab mice that are ever so curable, yet haven't led to a human cure to date. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Lisa, type 1 from New Mexico,writes: I wanted your thoughts on arecently published study in the journal Cell StemCell where scientists reprogrammed Alpha cells in the pancreases of mice toproduce insulin. [email protected] DMine answers: I read the article. And the more Iread, the more excited I got. This is some really, really, really goodresearch. It was well done, and opens up some exciting new possibilities. The basicidea here was to take some other cell in the body -- one that doesnt appear to beaffected by our haywired immune system -- and teach it to make insulin. And, asyou noted, the Pittsburgh-based team of scientists did more than just find anyold cell in the body, they went after the Alpha cells, which are already in thepancreas. OK, so Iguess that the idea of finding a replacement cell for the killed-off beta cellsisnt totally new, and it doesnt solve the underlying dysfunction in theimmune system. In fact, this particular approach seemed so unlikely to succeedthat the investigators are actually quoted as saying they fully expected itto fail. But something wonderful and unexpected happened. But Im getting aheadof myself. Heres thedeal: The investigators took some type 1 diabetic mice and successfullyreprogrammed their Alpha c Continue reading >>

New Hope For Human Patients As Scientists Reverse Type 1 Diabetes In Mice

New Hope For Human Patients As Scientists Reverse Type 1 Diabetes In Mice

Get short URL A team of scientists from Boston Children's Hospital have reversed type 1 diabetes in mice, leading to hopes that human sufferers of the autoimmune condition may soon be treated using a similar method. Hospital researchers said that all of the mice trialled were successfully cured of type 1 in the short term, while around one-third were cured for the duration of their lives. Previous studies have tried to cure the condition using immunotherapy. Patients in those studies were infused with their own blood stem cells, in an attempt to reboot their immune system. However, Boston researchers discovered that a genetic defect, which causes the blood stem cells to produce less of a protein called PD-L1, contributes to so-called juvenile diabetes. “We found that in diabetes, blood stem cells are defective, promoting inflammation and possibly leading to the onset of disease,” senior researcher Paolo Fiorina said in a statement. To combat the defective gene, the team replaced it with healthy genes and used a harmless virus as a carrier, they found that the treated cells reversed diabetes in the tested mice. “We think resolution of PD-L1 deficiency may provide a novel therapeutic tool for the disease,” study author Ben Nasr said. More research is now needed to determine how long the treatment would last in humans but scientists are hopeful as there weren’t any adverse effects of treatment on the mice. “The beauty of this approach is the virtual lack of any adverse effects, since it would use the patient's’ own cells,” Fiorina said. The research was published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Cured In Mice

Type 1 Cured In Mice

Ralph DeFronzo and his researchers at UT Health at San Antonio announced that they have cured type 1 diabetes. Researchers think they have found a way to trick the body into curing type 1 diabetes that may also have a great impact possibly for type 2 diabetes. Even though it was only in mice, this could be very positive, even with years of testing still remaining. Doctor Ralph DeFronzo, chief of the diabetes research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, says that this way of doing a gene transfer can wake up cells in the pancreas to produce insulin. The immune system of a person with diabetes kills off useful “beta” cells, but the researchers say they have found a way to make other cells in the pancreas perform the necessary work. Their approach, announced earlier this month in the academic journal Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, not only would have implications for type 1, but also could help treat the far more common type 2 diabetes. The researchers have cured mice, which are genetically similar to people but different enough that new rounds of animal testing are needed before human trials can begin. This approach is sure to attract skeptics, in part because it is a significant departure from the many other attempts at curing diabetes, which typically involve transplanting new cells and/or suppressing the immune system’s attempts to kill off useful ones. By contrast, “we’re taking a cell that is already present in the body and programming it to secrete insulin, without changing it otherwise,” said DeFronzo. Diabetes is a disease characterized by a person’s inability to process carbohydrates, a condition that if untreated can lead to often-catastrophic health consequences. The core problem is insulin. Most people naturally secrete that su Continue reading >>

Researchers Use Nanoparticle

Researchers Use Nanoparticle "vaccine" To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Mice

Researchers Use Nanoparticle "Vaccine" to Cure Type 1 Diabetes in Mice Researchers Use Nanoparticle "Vaccine" to Cure Type 1 Diabetes in Mice Researchers Use Nanoparticle "Vaccine" to Cure Type 1 Diabetes in Mice Using an innovative nanotechnology-based "vaccine," researchers were able to successfully restore normal blood sugar in mice with type 1 diabetes, and also slow the onset of diabetes in mice at risk for the disease. The study, co-funded by JDRF and published today in the online edition of the journal Immunity, has several key implications: First, it provides important new insights into how to stop the immune attack that causes type 1 diabetes. Second, it underscores the potential of "antigen-specific" therapies. Because the nanoparticle vaccine was designed with specific immune system proteins, it effectively blunted the targeted autoimmune response that causes diabetes without compromising the overall immune system - an issue that continues to be a challenge in developing treatments for diabetes. And third, it suggests that antigen-specific nanovaccines, because of the effectiveness shown here, might also be developed to treat other autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. That could make the science more attractive to drug development companies. Researchers from the University of Calgary in Alberta, led by Dr. Pere Santamaria, were looking to halt the autoimmune response that causes type 1 diabetes, but do so without damaging the immune cells that control and regulate the immune system or that protect against infections. So the team focused on developing a highly targeted antigen-specific immunotherapy - one, they explained, that could address the "internal tug-of-war between aggressive T cells that want to cause the disease Continue reading >>

Gene Therapy Reverses Type 1 Diabetes In Mice, Study Finds

Gene Therapy Reverses Type 1 Diabetes In Mice, Study Finds

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Gene therapy reverses type 1 diabetes in mice, study finds An experimental cure for type 1 diabetes has a nearly 80 percent success rate in curing diabetic mice. The results offer possible hope of curing a disease that affects 3 million Americans. An experimental cure for Type 1 diabetes has a nearly 80 percent success rate in curing diabetic mice. The results, being presented at The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting in Boston, offer possible hope of curing a disease that affects 3 million Americans. "With just one injection of this gene therapy, the mice remain diabetes-free long term and have a return of normal insulin levels in the body," said Vijay Yechoor, MD, the principal investigator and an assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Yechoor and his co-workers used their new gene therapy in a nonobese mouse model of Type 1 diabetes. The therapy attempts to counter the two defects that cause this autoimmune form of diabetes: autoimmune attack and destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells by T cells. First, the researchers genetically engineer the formation of new beta cells in the liver using neurogenin3. This gene defines the development of pancreatic islets, which are clusters of beta cells and other cells. Along with neurogenin3, they give an islet growth factor gene called betacellulin to stimulate growth of these new islets. The second part of the therapy aims to prevent the mouse's immune system from killing the newly formed islets and beta cells. Previously the research team combined neurogenin3 with the gene for interleukin-10, which regulates the immune system. However, with that gene, they achieved only a 50 percent cure rate in diabetic mice, Ye Continue reading >>

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