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Diabetes Crossfit

Crossfit: Suffering From Type 2 Diabetes? Crossfit Can Improve Blood Sugar Levels And Keep Your Heart Healthy - The Economic Times

Crossfit: Suffering From Type 2 Diabetes? Crossfit Can Improve Blood Sugar Levels And Keep Your Heart Healthy - The Economic Times

Suffering from type 2 diabetes? CrossFit can improve blood sugar levels and keep your heart healthy Stretch differently: Here is how fitness can be fun, too! WASHINGTON DC: Turns out, the high-intensity workout program , CrossFit , can do a lot besides just keeping people fit and fine. According to a study conducted by The Physiological Society, a six-week CrossFit exercise programme can lead to improved control of blood sugar levels and decreased risk of heart disease in people with Type II diabetes . Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. Type II diabetes is the most common form, which is where the body doesn't produce enough of the hormone that controls sugar levels, called insulin. People with Type II diabetes are at significantly higher risk of heart disease. A primary focus for managing diabetes is exercise, as it has been shown to improve the body's ability to control sugar levels by making the body more sensitive to the insulin produced. However, adherence to exercise advice is particularly low amongst those with Type II diabetes, who are mostly overweight or obese, with lack of time being cited as one of the greatest barriers to regular exercise. This new research suggested that a high-intensity exercise programme such as CrossFit improves the ability of the body to control blood sugar levels by reducing the amount of insulin required. Importantly, these improvements appear to be similar to the sort of change we would expect from more traditional exercise interventions, despite participants spending considerably less time exercising than health guidelines recommend. CrossFit, therefore, offered a time-effective exercise approach for people with Type II diabetes who struggle to maintain daily exercise. Cros Continue reading >>

Physician: Hes Basically Cured His Diabetes

Physician: Hes Basically Cured His Diabetes

Physician: Hes Basically Cured His Diabetes First he changed his diet. Then he started taking classes at CrossFit Painesville. Six months later, Pete Katz was off his medications. (Photo: BillSintic) Doctor explains how 48-year-old Pete Katz used diet and CrossFit to stop taking medications for diabetes, high blood pressure andanxiety. Days before Pete Katzs visits to his primary-care physician, he would go on a diet. It was his vain attempt to nudge his health markers in the right direction. But the short-lived change had little effect on an increasingly grim reality. Pete was in a common situation for many patients in that his weight was not ideal. And early on he did not have significant health problems from that, said Dr. J. Harry Isaacson, Katzs physician of roughly 15 years. Isaacson is also assistant dean for clinical education at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine in Ohio. Many people end up crossing a threshold where they start to accumulate different health problems from their weight. For Katz, that threshold was a Type 2 diabetes diagnosis at the age of 41. Thats a whole different ball game, Isaacson said. To treat the disease, the doctor prescribed oral medication. After three years, it wasnt enough. So Isaacson prescribed an injectable drug. This was in addition to Katzs treatments for anxiety and high blood pressure. Pete Katzs changes in health markers. (Graphic: Staff/CrossFit Journal) Injecting himself with medicine and constantly monitoring his insulin put enough fear into Katz that he finally heeded the advice Isaacson had long been giving him: Change your diet and start exercising. Before then, Katz had tried multiple diets and exercise programs over the years; nothing stuck. This time, he started following the Paleo Diet. About a month Continue reading >>

Should You Do Crossfit Training With Diabetes?

Should You Do Crossfit Training With Diabetes?

Should You Do CrossFit Training with Diabetes? With all the exercise training fads out there, it can be hard to navigate the landscape with diabetes. I am frequently asked about the latest training techniques or gym trends, so I want to specifically address a recent craze, CrossFit training, with regard to whether its appropriate and/or advisable for people with diabetes. In brief, CrossFit training is a strength and conditioning program consisting mainly of a mix of aerobic exercise, gymnastics (body weight exercises), and Olympic weight lifting. Its programming is decentralized, but its general methodology is used by thousands of private affiliated gyms around the world. CrossFit, Inc., licenses the CrossFit name to gyms for an annual fee and certifies trainers, but the actual programs vary tremendously from site to site. A concerned young man with type 1 diabetes contacted me to ask whether its safe for him to do CrossFit. Although he was already doing and benefiting from CrossFit training, he became concerned about it after reading a blog online by a Paleo diet advocate named Robb Wolf who, in an article about CrossFit training and type 1 diabetes, blogged that since intense training causes the liver to release excess glucose during training, people with type 1 diabetes may be better served by mild to low intensity activities. Power Lifting, due to the low volume, might be a good option. (This blogger also claimed that We have seen instance of people REVERSING type 1 diabetes with a Paleo diet because they put their autoimmunity in remission. That statement alone should make you question his credibility. If you really want to read it, please just don't believe everything you read online, especially his blog:My perspective is that, if youre young and healthy and jus Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Crossfit

Type 1 Diabetes And Crossfit

Ive touched on the topic of Type 1 diabetes before Here and Here . For those unfamiliar with Type 1 diabetes, it is an autoimmune disease in which the beta cells of the pancreases are damaged or destroyed and the individual looses the ability to produce insulin. Without exogenous (outside) insulin (or very smart nutrition and exercise) the Type 1 diabetic will die. As it is the Type 1 has a hell of a time managing blood sugar levels. There is simply no replacement for the immediate feedback mechanisms which govern normal pancreatic function. This is true not only with regards to monitoring blood glucose highs and lows from food, but also from odd inputs such as exercise and stress. The liver does much more than detox frat-boy livers after a night on the town in Chico, it is also a repository of energy, both in the form of fat and glucose stored as glycogen. Under normal circumstances we have an interplay of the food we eat toping off liver and muscle glycogen stores to be used either immediately or down the road a few hours or even days later. Interestingly, even if we eat a 0% carb diet we still end up with liver and muscle glycogen stores getting filled via a process called gluconeogenesis. In this situation we turn protein into glucose and this is one of the reasons there are no essential carbohydrates despite what the vegetardians will have you think. So, what does all this have to do with the Type 1 diabetic and CrossFit? Well, many people have noticed a dramatic improvement in blood glucose levels with a LOW CARB paleo diet. Dr. Bernstein has a great book that is right in line with this concept. A low carb diet pushes the body to use fat as a primary fuel source and this diminishes the need for more glucose to run many of the daily functions of the body. Think ab Continue reading >>

Marianna Rivera: Type 1 Diabetic & Crossfit Athlete

Marianna Rivera: Type 1 Diabetic & Crossfit Athlete

Marianna Rivera: Type 1 Diabetic & CrossFit Athlete My name is Marianna Rivera. I am a dedicated Crossfitter, a Type 1 Diabetic, a skeptic and a lover of wholesome food. Simply put, my life revolves around utilizing diet to control my Type 1 Diabetes, College, and striving to achieve my dreams as a Crossfit Athlete. I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes on January 9, 2012 when I was 13 years old and although it was a tragic diagnosis, I will be forever grateful that it happened to me. Not only has it made me a more diligent and driven individual, it is also what brought me to Crossfit which has now become one of my biggest passions in life. was your average kid with an above average desire for competition, sports, and anything that had to do with racing. However, around Christmas of 2011 I started to get sick and no longer had the energy to do the things I loved. I lost a dangerous amount of weight, was battling infections constantly, drinking water uncontrollably, and losing more and more of the spirit I was known for having. I went to the doctors and they noticed sugar in my urine; they pricked my finger and the meter read 540.a number I will never forget. The months following diagnosis were hard as we attempted to navigate the road less traveled towards a lifestyle that would enable me to consume less synthetic insulin and lead a more normal but significantly healthier life. After many hours of researching, weeks of troubleshooting, and months of coming to terms with my new reality; we adopted the paleo lifestyle. I eliminated the foods that elevated my blood sugar one a time, first sugar, then diary, next was wheat, then was grain, and finally peanut butter because I really didnt want to give that one up! After 8 short months, I was strict Paleo and no longer requir Continue reading >>

Crossfit + Diabetes = Awesome!

Crossfit + Diabetes = Awesome!

Ryan Attar lives with type 1 diabetes. He is an athletic maniac in CrossFit and Muy Thai, has traveled to over 60 countries, and blogs about his diabetes at the 1HappyDiabetic . As past powerlifter and athlete myself, I totally admire Ryans tenacity, and wanted to share his story with you! Ryan:I was diagnosed back in 2007. At the time I was a Captain onactive duty in the US Army, stationed in Germany. I was 27 years old. I had justhad PRK eye surgery to correct my vision, and told my eye doctor thatthe eye drops and other medication I was taking for it was making meurinate a lot. Of course, I found out just shortly after that it was actually diabetes (alas, eye surgery does not cause frequent urination). At first, I didt believeit, and thought it was something that shouldnt be happening tosomeone who lives a life thats active and healthy like I do. I spentanother year in the Army after that, in and out of medical appointments, before I was finally medically discharged. As capable as I am withdiabetes, being insulin dependent makes one unfit for duty. After theArmy I became very obsessed with my own health, fitness and diet andbegan educating myself on everything. After two years in another job Iquit, and applied to graduate school for a Masters in Nutrition. Imworking on that now and living in NYC. Ginger: Wow, so diabetes has, in a way, pointed you down a career path that you can now fully focus on! Speaking of, Ive heard you are an animal of an athlete! Tell me about your athletichobbies: Ryan:I got into CrossFit a few years ago and absolutely loved it! Forthose who havent heard of CrossFit, technically speaking it is thesport of fitness consisting of constantly varied, high intensity,functional movements usually using things like gymnastic, olympiclifting, running, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptom Management And Crossfit Training

Diabetes Symptom Management And Crossfit Training

Can 6 Weeks of CrossFit Training Help Ease Diabetes Symptoms? A recent study did produce encouraging results, but experts tell people with diabetes to be cautious with such an intense, quick-paced exercise routine. Can a month and a half of intense exercise actually improve the health of someone with diabetes? A recent study published in the journal Experimental Physiology determined that six weeks of an intensive CrossFit program could improve blood sugar levels, reduce insulin resistance, and decrease the risk for heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 30 million people in the United States and is a complex metabolic disorder. Some patients bodies struggle to produce enough insulin to meet their demands. This is sometimes the result of insulin resistance, a diet high in processed foods, and a lack of exercise. Other patients bodies produce enough insulin, but for reasons still not understood, their body struggles to make use of it properly. Both of these situations can make it harder to lose weight and easier to gain weight. Regular exercise is one of the most important prescriptions a doctor can write for a patient with type 2 diabetes. Is exercise in the form of CrossFit the ultimate answer? CrossFit is a fitness class that combines high-intensity aerobic exercise (such as sprints and box jumps) with high-intensity weightlifting (power cleans, deadlifts), and bodyweight exercises (pullups, rope climbs). Sessions range from 8 to 20 minutes in duration and represent a far more time-effective form of exercise than traditional exercise interventions, explained John Kirwan, executive director of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University and co-author of the study. In the study, researchers concluded Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Crossfit | Diabetic Muscle & Fitness

Diabetes & Crossfit | Diabetic Muscle & Fitness

CrossFit is a fitness regimen designed to improve physical fitness in a meaningful, measurable way. CrossFit is grounded on training the core movements and modalities of life at high intensity. These include the best aspects of gymnastics, weightlifting, running, rowing and more. Each modality and movement brings with it a unique fitness and physiological benefit when trained with intensity. This includes everything from cardiovascular fitness, strength, mobility and muscular endurance. Intensity is essential for dramatic gains in fitness and is determined by: Work divided by time. In other words, the more work you do in less time equates to more power and higher intensity. CrossFit utilises a different workout each day (usually 3 days ON, 1 day OFF) Each day you change not only the exercises you do, but the timeframe, loading and componentry You want to be able to run to catch a bus, carry ALL of the shopping bags, defend yourself against a mugger and maintain speed the whole time. <= Pretty fit, right? The importance on building a balanced self, through the application of elements from gymnastics, powerlifting, strongman, endurance sports like running and rowing and utilising calisthenic movements, is paramount when looking to be as physically ready for any task life, work or sport may throw at you. CrossFit programming is very often misunderstood and many assumptions are made simply by comparing what you see most prevalent in social media The sport of Fitness, CrossFit as a sport is vastly different from CrossFit as a training methodology! Imagine you are considering boxing as a fitness endeavour (something many people around the world do) and watching the infamous Rumble in the jungle where Ali and Foreman fought it out in the African heat for 8 rounds and ended in Continue reading >>

The Crossfit Uproar - Diabetes Self-management

The Crossfit Uproar - Diabetes Self-management

Many people with diabetes both Type 1 and Type 2 have become accustomed to comments in the media that treat diabetes as the inevitable result of poor lifestyle choices such as eating too much sugar, fat, or overall calories. In reality, of course, Type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors, while Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction to an environmental trigger. So last week, when Greg Glassman, the CEO of fitness company CrossFit, posted a photo on Twitter that parodied Coca-Colas open happiness slogan with the phrase open diabetes and included the comment, Make sure you pour some out for your dead homies the online backlash from people with diabetes was predictable. The highest-profile response probably came from Nick Jonas (of Jonas Brothers fame), who has Type 1 diabetes and responded on Twitter , This is not cool. Please know and understand the difference between type one and type [two] diabetes before making [i]gnorant comments. Sensitivity to all diseases, and proper education on the cause and day to day battle is important. The need to understand the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes has been a common theme in many online commentaries following Glassmans original Twitter post. Writing for The Huffington Post, diabetes educator Riva Greenberg notes that a great deal of the outrage online has come from people with Type 1 diabetes, and parents of children with the disease, who are tired of people thinking they (or their children) got it by eating too much sugar. But, of course as Greenberg points out many people with Type 2 diabetes would still have felt shamed and unfairly singled out if Glassman had been more specific and shared an open Type 2 diabetes Coca-Cola parody. Eve Continue reading >>

Fighting Diabetes With Crossfit

Fighting Diabetes With Crossfit

CrossFit has a controversial media relationship with diabetes and Coca Cola. But when you strip the fat away, Crossfit is a great way to combat the effects of the illness, as we found out from one determined and passionate Sicilian Crossfitter. Fausto Carbone is a 24 year old Crossfitter that trains at Crossfit Catania in Sicily. He was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, which has no known causes other than family history, when he was 11 years old. I can tell you that I am a type 1 diabetic for 13 years now. A disease from which there is no cure, but you can fight well with insulin, with physical activity and with so much willpower, and Crossfit helps this so much. It has changed me and helped me to cope better with my life. This is an important message to get to the people; now all over the world there are hundreds of millions of diabetics, and from the oldest to the youngest it is important to understand that nothing is impossible . Dedication and commitment to Crossfit, as well as life, will allow you to overcome everything. Fausto has used Crossfit to remedy many of the effects of diabetes, and trained hard in order to compete at a high level within the sport. He has taken part in european competitions like the Bruxelles throwdown 2014, southern warriors 2015 and fall series 2015. As well as working hard in the Box, he also studies. I am undertaking my medical degree and I am following a clinical study to demonstrate how even the effort of mixed aerobic and anaerobic exercise can help reduce oxidative stress due to stress hyperglycemic. In simpler terms, he is scientifically studying the effects of Crossfit on diabetes. There is a great deal of controversy surrounding CrossFit and diabetes. CrossFit CEO Greg Glassman sent a tweet that received a large social media bac Continue reading >>

Crossfitter With Genetic Type 2 Diabetes

Crossfitter With Genetic Type 2 Diabetes

I recently dropped into a box and had an exchange with a coach, that made me think it could be interesting to share what my life is like as CrossFitter and Spartan Racer with Type 2 Diabetes. Bit of background, I have been going to CrossFit for several years now, and started doing OCRs about two years ago. I am not overweight, I actually count macros and lean towards a paleo diet; mine is genetic which sadly many people do not understand is entirely possible and actually quite common. Both of my parents are diabetics and both Type 1 & Type 2 diabetes as well as insulin issues run on both my father's side and my mother's side of the family. My aunt, who I was very close with, died from sepsis after having an accident with her insulin pump. I have been getting blood work done 2x a year since I was a child as I was always told it wouldn't be "if" I developed diabetes, but "when". In college, I was on an athletics squad, and I fainted a few times during conditioning work, but I always chalked it up to going too hard; in reality, I knew it wasnt that, but I was scared to admit that I had insulin resistance. I didn't have to start taking diabetes medication until about two years ago; interestingly enough the day I was diagnosed was a Monday, and that prior Saturday, I had come in second at a women's Oly meet. I had been having terrible headaches, sporadic nausea and lethargy, not to mention overwhelming thirst. I knew it was probably coming, and with my family history, there was nothing I could do, but the diagnosis still stung. No one wants to have a chronic disease. One a day to day basis, I am pretty lucky. Occasionally I feel foggy and or lightheaded which is annoying; once we had Chief programmed at our box and I was so excited, but that am I woke up pretty lightheaded Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Athlete

The Diabetic Athlete

In 1998, two-time Olympic gold medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr. was preparing for the Goodwill Games when his hands suddenly began to shake in the middle of practice. He shrugged it off; after all, he was training up to eight hours a day, burning calories out of the pool as well as through running, weightlifting and boxing. He downed some PowerBars and Gatorade to boost his blood sugar and went back to work. But then he began sucking liquids like a diesel truck, sometimes drinking four gallons of orange juice in one sitting. Soon he couldnt make out the letters on a Pepsi can held at arms length. He had all the telltale signs of diabetes: extreme thirst, blurry vision and fatigue. When he was diagnosed, he was told that his swimming career was over. The doctors said exercise was good in moderation, but not at the level I was at, says Hall. Yet he continued to dive into his sport, revamping his diet and closely monitoring his condition for warning signs. And when he climbed out of the pool in Sydney last year, four more Olympic medals hung around his neck, two of them gold. Hall may be an exceptional case, but he shows that men can pursue active lifestyles, and even exceed their expectations, while managing diabetes. About 16 million Americans have diabetes, and about 2,200 new cases are diagnosed each day. There are two primary kinds of diabetes: Type 2, in which the body lacks sufficient insulin or the ability to use it properly, accounts for more than 85 percent of cases and is generally diagnosed in obese adults over 40. Type 1, in which the pancreas becomes unable to manufacture insulin, usually strikes those under 30 and is the more common condition among active males. Insulin is a protein hormone that enables the body to use sugar and other carbohydrates; it also help Continue reading >>

Crossfit Improves How People With Type 2 Diabetes Can Control Blood Sugar Levels

Crossfit Improves How People With Type 2 Diabetes Can Control Blood Sugar Levels

CrossFit improves how people with type 2 diabetes can control blood sugar levels New research published in Experimental Physiology has suggested a 6-week CrossFit exercise programme can lead to improved control of blood sugar levels and decreased risk of heart disease in people with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, which is where the body doesn't produce enough of the hormone that controls sugar levels, called insulin. People with Type 2 diabetes are at significantly higher risk of heart disease. A primary focus for managing diabetes is exercise, as it has been shown to improve the body's ability to control sugar levels by making the body more sensitive to the insulin produced. However, adherence to exercise advice is particularly low amongst those with Type 2 diabetes, who are mostly overweight or obese, with lack of time being cited as one of the greatest barriers to regular exercise. This new research suggests that a high intensity exercise programme such as CrossFit improves the ability of the body to control blood sugar levels by reducing the amount of insulin required. Importantly, these improvements appear to be similar to the sort of change we would expect from more traditional exercise interventions, despite participants spending considerably less time exercising than health guidelines recommend. CrossFit therefore offers a time-effective exercise approach for people with Type 2 diabetes who struggle to maintain daily exercise. CrossFit is a high intensity training intervention incorporating both endurance and strength training. Sessions range from 8-20 minutes in duration and represent a far more time-effective form of exercise than tradition Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Crossfit: What To Know Before You Go

Diabetes And Crossfit: What To Know Before You Go

Develop Your Diabetes Superpowers: Mindset, Mindfulness, & More Take charge and change your relationship with diabetes for the better. Diabetes and Crossfit: What to Know Before You Go As a type 1 diabetic of over 23 years, I wasnt always fit. In fact, if you asked me 7 years ago how to squat or deadlift, I wouldve looked at you like you were speaking a foreign language! Thats because when I was younger, exercise was scary to me. I weighed 200 pounds, and was embarrassed at the thought of going to a gym and not knowing where to start. However, in life, change is the only constant, and after spending 10 years of my diabetic life obese and with an A1C of 13.5%, I decided that I had enough, and it was time to change. In 2009 I enrolled in Personal Training school to become a Certified Personal Trainer, learn anatomy and physiology, and scariest of all, how to exercise. It was an amazing experience, and I was hooked on exercise from then on. However, I mainly worked out alone because I didnt want to have to explain to people in a class setting why I might have to stop in the middle of the class if my blood sugar dropped or spiked too quickly, or any other diabetes related issues that other people might not understand. So I went at it alone until the calling go to the next level was too loud to ignore. I knew that I needed coaching from trainers who had more experience than I did to get there. After watching what felt like my 100th Crossfit video on YouTube, I realized it was something I very much wanted to be a part of, but the thought of joining a group of experienced weight lifters who might not understand the intricacies of diabetes was daunting to me even though I was a Certified Personal Trainer and more physically fit than I had ever been. But just like I dont let di Continue reading >>

How Intermittent Fasting Helped Giddens Boost Her Well-being

How Intermittent Fasting Helped Giddens Boost Her Well-being

RELATED: 8 Steps to Weight Loss Success for People With Type 2 Diabetes Starting Her Journey to Weight Loss and Managing Her Blood Sugar Giddens signed up for Weight Watchers online , and after 18 months, she had lost about 120 lb. She also joined the YMCA, hired a personal trainer, and tried a bodybuilding-type diet and paleo , but her weight loss eventually plateaued. Her ultimate goal was to lose 175 lb. She then discovered CrossFit a fitness program that focuses on fast-paced, functional movements that are done at high intensity. CrossFit workouts include aspects of gymnastics, weightlifting, rowing, and other sports. Giddens also hired a nutrition coach who taught her about counting macros, or macronutrients, which include protein, fat, and carbohydrates. The nutrition coach introduced her to intermittent fasting (IF) , a plan that includes periods of normal eating with periods of fasting . Although no kind of fasting is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because it may cause dangerous blood sugar swings, leading to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia , Giddens says she has found success with her own version of the plan, and she did it with supervision from her personal trainer. I monitored my blood sugars at home with a home monitor. Being a nurse, I knew what the risks were, how to monitor for them, and how to treat myself if my blood sugars got too low," Giddens says. Giddenss fasting diet alternates 17 hours of fasting with a seven-hour window to eat between 2 p.m. and 9 p.m. Unlike the other diets she tried, Giddens says, she didnt feel deprived. Annie Giddens doing CrossFit in August 2016 at 185 pounds. What to Know About Trying Intermittent Fasting While Managing Diabetes While IF can be an effective and often safe way to lose weight for people without Continue reading >>

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