diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Cooking

How To Cook For A Diabetic

How To Cook For A Diabetic

Expert Reviewed Three Parts:Making Diabetic-Friendly Food ChoicesTrying Diabetic-Friendly RecipesUsing Healthy Preparation TechniquesCommunity Q&A Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose is too high because it cannot properly make or use insulin. Glucose comes from what you eat and having too much of it can damage your body. Because of this, it’s important for any diabetic person to cook and eat healthy foods that help control blood glucose.[1] But you may be unsure of how to best cook for a diabetic. By making diabetic-friendly food choices and using sensible and healthy preparation techniques, you can cook for a diabetic. Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Learning To Cook Diabetes-friendly Meals

Learning To Cook Diabetes-friendly Meals

Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Whats for dinner? is a relatively common question that Im hearing quite often from my husband, Don. Before he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in December, what I prepared for lunch or dinnerdidn'tmatter as much. I strove to make healthy meals most of the time, but I also made a lot of fried foods, too. Now, with his diagnosis, my kitchen preparations have changed for the better for both of us. Eating smaller meals , enjoying the food you like but in moderation, and making changes to your diet are allstrategies for success in maintaining a good healthy blood sugar. Other strategies included keeping a food journal , working with a nutritionist, taking it slow with weight loss by aiming to lose one or two pounds a week, and keeping an exercise routine. Being aware of the kinds of food we eat and how they are prepared has become necessary to keep my husbands glucose levels balanced and in control. Making less food for dinner has also reduced the amount we eat. These changes are helping me as well. Growing up on a farm with my parents and seven siblings, meal time was a big deal. My mother was always in the kitchen preparing huge meals for all of us. With four brothers and a father who were big eaters, plus the girls, who all had their fair share of moms good cooking, mom was cooking for hours in shifts. She always strove to serve the four food groups at every meal, no matter what. My mother canned hundreds and hundreds of jars of fruits, tomatoes, and vegetables. Our garden was over an acre in size with a long field of sweet corn. We shared our abundance with neighbors and people in the church. With dairy Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating And Cooking

Healthy Eating And Cooking

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Healthy eating is an important part of diabetes management, but it can be hard to know where to start. Use these resources to help you eat healthier at home and away from home. Eat Right Learning how to eat right is an important part of managing your diabetes. This web page provides tips on healthy eating, weight management, recipes, and special diets. Remember, eating healthy is not just for people with diabetes. Tips for Enjoying Summer Gatherings if You Have Diabetes Making healthy food choices, even while on vacation, is a key step to staying healthy. NDEP has tips for eating healthy over the summer, especially when youre with a group of people. Healthy Eating During Winter Gatherings for People with Diabetes Winter is a season of holiday celebrations, football playoffs, and other occasions when family and friends get together over meals and snacks. Learn to make healthy food choices and limit portion sizes without giving up all your favorite foods. These culturally-tailored tip sheets help people with diabetes make healthy food choices at holidays, celebrations and buffets. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes

Diabetic Recipes

Take charge of the battle against diabetes with the help of the experts at Cooking Light magazine, including these recipes, study reports, videos and more. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cooking Tips

Diabetes Cooking Tips

Are your favorite foods full of salt and saturated with fat? Try these makeover-meal ideas for a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . You dont have to give up your Friday night pasta or completely swear off sweets to maintain a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Your cooking style just needs a makeover. And you can tweak your favorite recipes so you dont feel like youre missing out on taste. As you get started, consider your goals are for overhauling your cooking to accommodate a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. Do you want to manage blood sugar? Lose weight? Boost nutrition? Or better yet, all of the above? If youre focused on blood-sugar control , it's best to think about controlling carbohydrate portions, says Susan Spratt, MD, an endocrinologist and an assistant professor of medicine at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. But its also important to watch your fat intake and overall calories because of the role they play in obesity and heart disease. A study published in the March 2014 issue of the British Journal of Nutrition noted that a low-fat diet was beneficial for people with diabetes in reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, and fasting blood sugar levels. High blood sugar, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol all increase the risk for heart disease, Dr. Spratt says. Because controlling all three is important to reducing that risk, these recommendations are focused on more than just how to control blood sugar. says. Here's how to achieve all of these objectives: Fat isnt a bad word, but its important to limit the amount you eat and use to cook. Too much fat in the diet can increase body weight, and excess body weigh Continue reading >>

15 Cooking And Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes

15 Cooking And Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes

15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes Employ these super simple ways to cut back on sugar and carbswithout sacrificing your favorite foods. For most of us, dialing back on sugar and simple carbs is an effective way to fast-track the weight loss process. However, for those living with diabetes, adhering to this diet strategy can be a matter of life and death. Diabetics are two to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke, according to the American Heart Association. And for those who dont properly control their condition, the odds of health issueswhich range from cardiovascular trouble to nerve damage and kidney diseaseincreases exponentially. Though the consequences of veering off track from a diabetes-friendly diet can be downright terrifying, that doesnt mean you have to adhere to a bland, boring diet. In fact, this common misconception is the reason Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, penned the forthcoming Eat What You Love Diabetes Cookbook , which devotes all of its 200+ pages to the art of eating your cake and having it, too. After working with thousands of diabetic individuals over the years, I noticed that many asked me the same question at their first appointment. Can I still eat my favorite foods? And the answer from me was always Yes! Its the portion sizes and frequency that makes the most difference, in addition to how the food is prepared, Zanini tells us, adding, After years of working one on one with newly diagnosed diabetics, I knew there was a need for this book. It makes controlling your blood sugar simple. Zaninis book will hit stands November 1st, but we couldnt wait to share some of her amazing tips that will totally change living with diabetes as you know it! Read on to get in Continue reading >>

A Guide To Cooking For One

A Guide To Cooking For One

How to treat yourself right when dining on your own Everyone eats alone sometimes. Whether your usual companion is out of town for a few days or you live by yourself and often dine on your own, there's no need to resort to wolfing down a bowl of cereal over the kitchen sink when you could be eating in style. This month we offer tips and techniques for making single servings work, from planning to shopping to the final product. While it may seem at first like a lot of trouble to prepare a complete meal for one, the results are well worth it. Homemade dishes are usually more nutritious and economical than restaurant meals. Cooking well for yourself can also be an important way to make your own health and happiness a priority. In other words: You're worth it. It may also be helpful to think of preparing dinner less as a chore than as a way to relax and de-stress. You can try out different recipes at your leisure without the pressure of others' approval. And you get to choose your favorite foods, since you are the only one you have to please. Begin the process by setting the mood. Make an effort to establish a dividing line between the day's activities and dinnertime. Set a place at the table with your favorite linen. Turn off the television, turn on the music, light a candle or two, maybe have a glass of wineand enjoy taking care of yourself. Planning makes a huge difference when it comes to healthy eating. That's certainly true for big families, but it may be even more so for individuals and couples. Set a goal to plan menus for a week at a time. Don't like the idea of leftovers? Think of them as "planned overs" instead: A small roast prepared on a Sunday, for example, could serve as an open-face sandwich on Monday and a vegetable stir-fry with small amounts of beef on T Continue reading >>

Dos And Don’ts Of Cooking For Diabetes

Dos And Don’ts Of Cooking For Diabetes

Cooking shouldn't be a chore, even with dietary restrictions. Follow these suggestions for helpful ideas on making cooking fun'even when you have diabetes Source: Web exclusive, August 2011 A diabetes diagnosis can be a shock when it comes to preparing meals. All of a sudden, old stand-bys may be off limits, and new recipes time-consuming to prepare, if only because they’re unfamiliar. But it’s important to stay positive, says Nova Scotia-based registered dietitian Mary Sue Waisman, author of Dietitians of Canada cookbook Cook! 275 Recipes Celebrate Food from Field to Table. ‘When you cook, you’ve got control,’ she says. ‘It’s a basic principle that I think is really helpful for people.’ Basically, it all comes down to blood sugar and nutrition. Not only do you want meals with a low glycemic index, meaning that blood sugar will rise slowly rather than spiking, but you want meals that are rich in nutrients the body needs’vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, fibre’and lower in those we tend to overindulge in, such as fat, salt and sugar. ‘Look to have a colourful plate filled with lots of vegetables and whole grains and perfect in portion size,’ says Waisman. So how do you get there? Follow these dos and don’ts for healthy meals that are full of flavour and fun to prepare. Don’t: Cook multiple meals ‘When you’re cooking if you have diabetes, it’s a healthy way for everybody to eat,’ Waisman says. Take advantage of your dietary upgrade by getting the whole family involved in choosing and preparing meals. ‘It’s a good time to establish lifelong cooking skills,’ she adds. Do: Surround yourself with the best choices ‘I tell people to get naked with food and look for it in its most basic form,’ says Waisman’meaning, as unprocessed a Continue reading >>

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

If you are a caregiver for someone with type 1 diabetes, you know that a healthy diet and proper food preparation are an important part of controlling diabetes. "You don't need to buy special foods,” advises Sue Tocher, MS, RD, dietitian and diabetes clinical program coordinator at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. “You should prepare the same healthy foods that would be recommended for someone without diabetes. That means plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and a low concentration of fats and sweets." Diabetes: Food and Blood Glucose Levels It's important for diabetics to keep their glucose from getting too low or too high. This is achieved by regularly checking blood glucose levels and regulating insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake. It's best to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates each day, eat and snack at regular hours, and avoid skipping meals. "Carbohydrates are the most important food group for diabetics,” says Tocher. “These are the foods that impact glucose levels. Fats and proteins supply calories but have little effect on blood glucose." Foods that contain lots of carbs include bagels, crackers, dried beans and peas, fruit, pasta and rice, and of course, sweets. Diabetes: The Food Pyramid The diabetes food pyramid illustrates how to make the best food choices. The pyramid has six color-coded categories, each representing a different food group. "The idea of the food pyramid is to get you to eat from a variety of food groups,” says Tocher. “The foods closest to the bottom are the foods that are closest to their natural state, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables, beans, and fresh fruit. You want to get your calories from the bottom up." Foods from the bottom also provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Moving up the pyramid, as t Continue reading >>

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

Indulge in these diabetic-friendly dishes Not all low-carb, low-sugar meals have to be tasteless. Check out this collection of recipes to find a dish perfect for every course. Applesauce Pancakes Trading butter for applesauce is a healthy way to cut out excess fat and still enjoy the sweetness of pancakes. Try this recipe: Applesauce Pancakes Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetes-friendly Cooking

7 Tips For Diabetes-friendly Cooking

Who says that having diabetes means you can’t still whip up delicious, homemade food? When you know the basics of meal planning, you can make almost any recipe work. So don’t throw out your cookbooks or toss your favorite recipes. Instead, take some tips about how to cook wisely. 1. Cook with liquid fats in place of solid fats. Solid fats often include saturated fats, which you should limit, or trans fats, which you should avoid totally. If a recipe calls for solid fat like butter, lard, or hydrogenated shortening, try trans-fat free margarine, spreads, or shortening instead. Check the label to see whether the product will work for cooking or baking. Many liquid fats -- oils such as canola, corn, olive, and grape seed -- can be healthy when used in moderate amounts. Some oils have stronger flavors that may affect the taste. So experiment to find which oils work best with which recipes. 2. Switch to low-fat dairy. Many dairy products used in cooking and baking are high in fat. You can lower the fat content without compromising taste. Instead of whole milk or half-and-half, pour 1% or skim milk, condensed skim milk, or nonfat half-and-half. Instead of sour cream, try low-fat or nonfat plain yogurt, buttermilk, or even low-fat cottage cheese (you may need to blend it first to make it smooth.) To make a sauce that calls for cream or whole milk, use cornstarch and skim milk. 3. Use less fat altogether. For many dishes, you can use 25% to 33% less fat than what the recipe says. Another tip: Substitute applesauce or mashed bananas for some or all of the fat in baked goods. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Pl Continue reading >>

Healthy Cooking Tips For Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Healthy Cooking Tips For Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Choose leaner cuts of meats. Buy select cuts instead of prime. Eat seafood twice a week. Good choices are salmon, sardines, and mackerel. Limit processed food like hot dogs, ham, and deli meat. Limit red meat. Have no more than 4 ounces, three times a week. Buy extra lean ground beef or use ground turkey or chicken. Eat a large amount of vegetables. Half your plate should be veggies at every meal. Use cooking spray or small amounts of olive or canola oil instead of butter. Grill, broil, bake, and stir fry instead of frying. Steam vegetables in water or low sodium broth. Remove the skin before cooking chicken and turkey. Trim any visible fat off of meat before cooking. Use herbs and spices to season rather than salt. Refrigerate soups, stews and gravy. Skim the fat off the surface before serving. Rinse canned vegetables before cooking. Be careful of cross contamination. Dont use the same plate or container for raw and cooked food. Throw out anything left out for two hours or more. Continue reading >>

3 Healthy Cooking Tricks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

3 Healthy Cooking Tricks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

3 Healthy Cooking Tricks for People With Type 2 Diabetes To make your recipes more diabetes-friendly, tweak your cooking methods with these simple tricks. Sign Up for Our Everyday Health: Diabetes Step-by-Step Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Luckily, there are lots of ways to adapt recipes for your type 2 diabetes diet, and there are diabetes cookbooks that offer a wide range of delicious dishes from many flavorful cuisines. You can also learn to use healthier cooking methods in order to reduce the amount of saturated fat in food, making the resulting dishes more diabetes-friendly. Here are some easy ways to make your meals healthier so that you can help manage your type 2 diabetes: Broil, grill, poach, steam, bake, or roast meat or fish. These methods either do not require added fat or allow the fat to drip away from the food during cooking. Try marinating meat overnight to add flavor without fat. In a wok or skillet, use low-sodium broth instead of oil to quickly brown foods like meat or tofu. With these healthier cooking methods, youll be able to create diabetes-safe meals the whole family will enjoy, without sacrificing flavor. Still not sure what to make tonight for dinner? Check out this list of delicious diabetes-friendly dinner ideas . Continue reading >>

7 Healthy Cooking Methods For Diabetes

7 Healthy Cooking Methods For Diabetes

Bake, steam, grill , saute, stir-fry, roast, or poach: Whichever healthy cooking method you choose, we'll show you the ropes and make it easy for you to prepare nutritious meals. If cooking healthfully seems impossible, you've come to the right place. Whether you want to bake, steam, grill, saute, stir-fry, roast, or poach, our breakdown of seven easy cooking methods proves anyone can cook healthfully. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Baking is a cooking method that circulates dry heat around food for a prolonged period. It requires minimal fat to make food browned and crisp. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Drizzle cut vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, with a small amount of oil (use 1 tablespoon per 2 cups of vegetables), and add desired seasonings; toss to coat. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Line a baking sheet with foil and spray with nonstick cooking spray. Spread foods in an even layer without overlapping. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet To make certain foods, such as breaded chicken strips, more crisp and browned, lightly spray nonstick cooking spray over foods before baking. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Steaming is a method of moist-heat cooking that uses steam to conduct heat to delicate foods, such as vegetables and seafood. Because the vegetables are not submerged in water, cooking them by steam is the best way to preserve their nutrients and bright colors. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Place a steamer basket or steamer tray in a large pot. The basket or tray should extend to the edges of the pot. What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetic Diet Pour water into the pot over the steamer basket. The water should come up to the bottom of the basket but not through the holes. What to Eat with Diabetes , Continue reading >>

More in diabetes