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Diabetes Control Tips

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For Better Blood Glucose Control

Top 10 Tips For Better Blood Glucose Control

My office used to receive phone calls about once a week asking if we held support groups for kids with diabetes. I had honestly never thought to have one. Why would any kid want to come to a support group when there are cartoons to watch and siblings to torment? But finally, I agreed to give it a shot. It was an epic failure and a rousing success all wrapped up in one. The kids were miserable. They ranged in age from 4 to 14, which may have accounted for some of the struggles I and my staff had in getting them focused. As much as we tried to engage them in fun social activities, the younger ones were incapable of holding still, and the older ones slouched in their chairs with looks on their faces suggesting thoughts such as, “This is stupid. I’d rather be on Facebook.” About the only time they would look up was to check the clock. The parents, on the other hand, had the time of their lives. We had coffee and snacks for them in the other room, and I could hear them laughing and carrying on. Some of the snippets of conversation I overheard stuck in my brain: “…you wouldn’t believe the food stash I found under his bed…” “…if she remembered her meter like she remembered her cell phone…” “…anyone else have bloody test strips all over their house?…” “…we change his pump while he’s sleeping so we don’t have to sit on him…” “…exercise? You’ve got to be kidding…” All things considered, it was some of the best venting I had heard since the HVAC convention was in town. It was then that we decided to give the kids a reprieve and instead start a support group for parents of kids with diabetes. For years, the group met, shared some things, learned some things, and taught me a thing or two. I already understood how complex it can b Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes: 21 Little Healthy Habits To Start

Prevent Diabetes: 21 Little Healthy Habits To Start

iStock/Floortje Dairy haters, listen up: Women who ate the most low-fat dairy products had a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a recent study of more than 82,000 women published in the Journal of Nutrition. Researchers think that certain milk proteins increase insulin secretion. Interaction among nutrients such as vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium may also lower the risk of diabetes. Another factor: If you're filling up on dairy, you may be less likely to eat other foods, such as sweetened beverages or snacks, which can raise diabetes risk. (Could you have diabetes? Don't miss these surprising diabetes symptoms.) Use the news: Swap your usual bagel or muffin breakfast for yogurt (mix in berries and nuts for a filling, nutritious parfait), enjoy a glass of skim milk with fruit for dessert, and snack on a low-fat string cheese with a couple of whole-grain crackers to quench pre-dinner cravings. iStock/zeljkosantrac New research confirms that a produce-rich diet can reduce your diabetes risk, according to a British study from the Institute of Metabolic Science in Cambridge. After researchers studied the eating habits of more than 3,700 adults ages 40 through 79, then followed them for 11 years, they discovered that adults with the highest fruit and vegetable intake (about six servings daily) had a 21 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who ate the least (about two servings a day). Variety mattered: People who consumed 16 different kinds of produce a week were 40 percent less likely to develop diabetes than those who ate just eight different types. Here's how eating a high-fiber diet helps diabetes. Use the news: Have at least one fruit or veggie at every meal or snack, and change things up from day to day and week to week. Challenge yours Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Tips: When To Use Insulin - Unitypoint Health

Diabetes Diet Tips: When To Use Insulin - Unitypoint Health

Diabetes Diet or Insulin? How to Best Control Blood Sugar Finding out you have type 2 diabetes can be overwhelming to say the least. Your diet suddenly becomes even more important, as you closely track and learn to what to eat to control your blood sugar. Darlene Turner, ARNP, CDE , UnityPoint Health, offers diabetes diet tips and also discusses when it might be necessary to use insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes more resistant to the insulin naturally produced and released by the pancreas. The pancreas becomes overworked when large amounts of carbohydrates are consumed, and the body can’t keep up with the amount of insulin needed. Turner says type 2 diabetes management depends on whether the diagnosis is made early or late in the disease process. “Sometimes, we find type 2 diabetes early, and we can treat it with diet changes and possibly oral medication,” Turner says. “However, sometimes we diagnose it when the person has already had it a long time, and the pancreas is hardly making any insulin. In that case, we need to have insulin from the beginning in order to gain control of their blood sugars.” Turner says that many people with type 2 diabetes who manage the condition for years will still need insulin at some point, due to the natural progression of the disease. There are three parts to type 2 diabetes management: dietary changes, an activity plan and medication. Turner recommends learning all you can about diabetes to get it controlled quickly, before more insulin resistance is created from high blood sugar levels. “Our bodies respond better to lifestyle changes early in the disease process, rather than allowing uncontrolled diabetes to go on for a few years before getting serious about taking care of the condition. Lifestyle chan Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Manage Diabetes During The Holidays

10 Tips To Help Manage Diabetes During The Holidays

Enjoy the festivities of the holiday season and manage your A1C levels with these easy tips and tricks. If you have diabetes, managing your A1C levels is always top of mind. During the holiday season however, when cookies, cakes and indulgent dishes beckon at every turn, it can be even more of a challenge to stick to your meal plan and keep your blood sugar levels steady. "It can be difficult to maintain a healthy meal plan when holiday get-togethers are often centered around foods we wouldn’t always consider eating," says Rachel Johnson, a registered dietitian for Abbott. "The good news is that although you should be mindful of what you eat, the right planning can help you make healthier choices while still enjoying this time with family and friends." Here are some simple planning strategies and nutrition swaps, so you can enjoy the festivities and stay on track. 1. Plan Ahead Before you get to any event, have a plan in place for what you will eat. For example, if you know that there will only be hors d'oeuvres, plan to select those that are lower in calories and won’t spike your blood sugar, such as vegetables and lean proteins. Be cautious of dips or sauces that can add hidden calories, salt or sugar. You can also plan ahead by looking at online restaurant menus to plan your meal ahead of time. If the event is at a house, ask the host what he or she is planning to serve, and offer to bring your own healthy dish that complements the meal. 2. Don’t Skip Meals Skipping a meal can negatively impact your blood glucose level, Johnson says. If the holiday schedule has you busy, keep diabetes friendly options close like Glucerna® shakes and bars. Made by Abbott, they have blends of carbohydrates that are slowly digested and absorbed to help minimize blood sugar spikes Continue reading >>

Travel Tips For Better Diabetes Control

Travel Tips For Better Diabetes Control

Diabetes and Travel Travel is a wonderful way to discover new places and cultures. Having diabetes shouldn't stop you from experiencing new places. With these tips from the American Diabetes Association, you can stay healthy and safe on your adventures far from home! Diabetes Travel Tip #1: See Your Doctor First Having diabetes means you should plan ahead before you travel. Be sure to see your doctor before you leave. Get a check-up and make sure your diabetes is in control. If you need immunizations for your destination get them at least one month before departure. This way, if the shots make you sick, you'll have time to recover. You'll need two important items from your doctor: a letter and prescriptions. The letter should explain in detail what you need to manage your diabetes while you're away, such as taking diabetes pills or insulin shots. It should also list insulin, syringes, and other medications or devices you used, along with allergies or food sensitivities. You may complete a TSA (Transportation Security Administration) notification card to present to the officer at the airport. This card is another way to inform the TSA officers of your condition. Your doctor should also prescribe any insulin, diabetes medications, and syringes you will need; you should have more than enough to last throughout your trip. In the Unites States, prescription rules vary, depending on the state. However, your prescription may help in case of emergency. If you are traveling abroad, research prescription laws of your destination, they may be very different than those at home. The insulin you use The syringes you use Other medications or devices you use Your allergies Your food sensitivities Diabetes Travel Tip #2: Carry-On Luggage Always take your medications and medical supplies Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? These 6 Tips Can Help You Live Better

Have Diabetes? These 6 Tips Can Help You Live Better

Have Diabetes? These 6 Tips Can Help You Live Better by Dr. Larry Wu | Feb 9, 2018 | Diabetes , Health & Wellness | 0 comments March 27 is Diabetes Alert Day. But didyou know that approximately 750,000 adults (1 in 10 adults) in North Carolina have diabetes? Even worse, the occurrenceof diabetes in The Tar Heel State is far greater than the national average and is expected to increase in years to come. Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes can be controlled by your eating habits and lifestyle. And while there are millions of people with diabetes, your treatment plan should be specific to you . Making the right lifestyle choices can delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes, and possibly delay the need for adding expensive medication to manage diabetes in the future. If you have Type I diabetes, the right choices will help you maintain control, in addition to insulin therapy. Here are six tips to help you manage your diabetes, stay healthy and live well: If you are overweight, weight loss is the primary goal. As little as 5% weight loss can vastly improve your diabetes control. And, contrary to popular belief, not all healthy foods taste like cardboard. A healthy diet is one of the most important aspects of managing diabetes, yet most individuals do not change their diets after receiving their diagnosis. But dont worry, you can still eat healthy and enjoy your foods. Heres how: Start with small changes. You do not need to give up all of your favorite foods at once. Making one small change a week, like omitting a serving per day, can make a big difference in the long run. Eat good carbohydrates, leafy or yellow vegetables, whole grains, legumes, fruit and low-fat dairy Substitute wheat pasta for regular pasta. You could even try substituting spaghetti squash for traditional pasta noodle Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes And Blood Sugar Control

Understanding Diabetes And Blood Sugar Control

Imagine this scene. Your doctor tells you that you have diabetes. You are afraid as you are not too sure what it all means. You start hearing new terms such as blood glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, fasting blood sugars and it seems overwhelming. So let’s take a minute to break it down. Understanding your disease is the first step in maintaining your health. So what exactly does it mean to have diabetes? When a person eats, whether they have diabetes or not, the glucose level in their blood rises. The term “blood glucose level” is commonly referred to as “blood sugar”. A rise in blood glucose levels after eating is normal, and it’s how the body nourishes the cells. When a person does not have diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin, whose job it is to bring down glucose levels in the blood stream before it rises to a dangerous level. Insulin equalizes blood glucose levels to safe levels. But when a person has diabetes, their pancreas does not produce enough insulin, if any at all, or the insulin they produce is not working properly. Therefore, when a person has diabetes, the blood glucose rises unimpeded, causing damage to the organs. If uncontrolled and levels rise dangerously high, it could cause coma or death. Chances are you may have family members and friends who have diabetes. As a matter of fact, 6 percent of Americans have diabetes. November 14th is designated as World Diabetes Day. What causes glucose levels to rise? Blood sugars in our blood stream rise naturally when we eat, in order to feed our cells. But not all foods cause an equal rise in blood sugar. Foods containing carbohydrates make blood glucose levels rise sharply. When those levels go beyond safe levels, damage occurs to organs and nerve endings. Foods high in ca Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes: Tips To Stay Healthy On The Road

Running With Diabetes: Tips To Stay Healthy On The Road

Running With Diabetes: Tips to Stay Healthy on the Road Running With Diabetes: Tips to Stay Healthy on the Road It's possible to run, be active and even do marathons when you have diabetes. In fact, it may even help you. If you have diabetes, here are a few tips to help you get inspired, put your running shoes on, and hit the open road. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. There is also another type that occurs in pregnancy called gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common with roughly 90 percent of diabetics with this type. Diabetes affects a huge number of the population, including 23 million adults and children in the United States (or 7.8 percent of the population) and about 2.5 million and an estimated half a million people who unknowingly have the condition in the United Kingdom. These numbers are on the rise particularly with the increasing rates of inactivity and obesity worldwide. Most shocking is the rising number of young people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, which used to be a condition only associated with adulthood. When someone has Type 2 diabetes, their body doesn't make enough insulin or it doesn't use it properly. This is known as insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, which is responsible for controlling blood sugars, lipid and protein metabolism. People with Type 2 diabetes often have a strong family history and tend to be overweight with a high waist circumference, often a marker for intra-abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Eating a balanced diet and exercising to lose weight are key to caring for Type 2 diabetes. To achieve a balanced diet, a person should eat meals rich in fruits and vegetables, use healthy oils such as olive oil, and eat lean proteins such as chicken or Continue reading >>

10 Holiday Survival Tips If You Have Diabetes

10 Holiday Survival Tips If You Have Diabetes

Some of my patients with diabetes ask me what’s the big deal if their blood sugar levels go up a little or they gain a few pounds over the holidays. They say they can always lose the weight afterward and get their sugar levels under control. To an extent, that could be true. If you’re in good overall health, doing well with your diabetes control and manufacturing reasonable amounts of insulin, a day or two of indulging a bit more than usual in holiday food shouldn’t be a problem. How long that overindulgence goes on, and how many times, though, are important factors. The holidays can easily extend well past New Year’s. If you slip into bad eating habits, you can do long-term damage, raise your blood sugars and gain weight. You can keep your weight and blood sugar levels under control during the holidays using these tips. 1. Maintain your schedule If you overeat, trying to catch up by skipping a meal afterward may cause you to overeat when you have your next meal or if a snack is available. Even on your holiday and days away from work, try to get up, eat, exercise and take your diabetes and any other medications about the same time as you usually do. 2. Check your blood sugar frequently If you are taking insulin or medications that lower your blood sugar, check your blood sugar more frequently during the holidays, especially before driving a car or adjusting your insulin doses. Make allowances for the changes in your work and exercise schedules as well as your eating opportunities. 3. Budget your sweets and treats To keep your blood sugars from skyrocketing, include sweets and treats as part of your carbohydrate budget — not in addition to it. Choose the meat and side vegetables and salad at dinner. Your carbohydrate for dinner could be Aunt Emily’s nut roll Continue reading >>

How To Achieve Tight Type 1 Blood Glucose Control

How To Achieve Tight Type 1 Blood Glucose Control

When it comes to treating type 1 diabetes, keeping tight blood glucose control—that is, keeping your blood glucose levels as close to your goal range as possible—can prevent long-term diabetes complications such as eye damage, kidney damage, nerve damage, heart attacks, and strokes. But what exactly does having tight control (also known as intensive insulin therapy) mean in your daily life? Read on to find out about the basics of tight control. Tight control is considered an aggressive treatment. It started with a major study called the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, which ran from 1983 to 1993.1 The study included 1,441 people with type 1 diabetes. Researchers followed these participants for several years; they closely looked at intense therapy vs the standard diabetes therapy. What they found was that intense therapy limited long-term diabetes complications. Benefits of Having Tight Blood Glucose Control There are some immediate benefits as well as some long-term benefits of having tight control. Some short-term benefits are that you'll notice you have more energy and feel better overall. The long-term benefits of tight control are that it can help prevent macrovascular complications (eg, heart disease) and other diabetes-related complications, and it can reduce the risk of having a baby with birth defects (important if you're planning on having a baby). Risks of Having Tight Blood Glucose Control Although there are many benefits of achieving tight control, there are some risks, too. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels) is one of the major risks when it comes to tight control. Any change to your daily routine can cause hypoglycemia, but tight control can make it more likely. Another risk of tight control is weight gain. However, if you follow your ex Continue reading >>

Five Top Food Tips For Diabetics

Five Top Food Tips For Diabetics

Learn the top five food tips that our doctors and dietitians teach at the Pritikin Longevity Center. They just may change your life. You'll learn about foods that are not only tasting and filling, they may also get your diabetes under control, for good. Our top food tip for diabetics is to lose excess weight by choosing low-calorie-dense, fiber-rich foods. They're healthy, and they will help keep hunger at bay. Fill each plate of food with low-calorie-dense, fiber-rich choices like vegetables, beans, and fruit, and you will lose weight. Weight loss is your #1 goal. Even a 5% reduction in weight can change the way your body uses its own insulin and responds to the foods you eat. So, if weight loss is your goal, vegetables, beans, and fruits are foods that will help you reach that goal. Choosing these low-calorie-dense, fiber-rich foods more often will help keep hunger at bay with a lower caloric cost, and theyll help you lose weight without having to count calories. Our Pritikin doctors and dietitians want you to eat fruit (remember, fruits are low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods that will help you lose weight). Our only recommendation is that you combine your fruit with something else. For example, in the morning add some berries to hot, whole-grain cereal. In the afternoon, pair a piece of fruit with veggie sticks. After dinner, make fruit your dessert. These extra foods add extra fiber, which can help stabilize blood sugar after a meal. Start each day with breakfast (oatmeal or another type of cooked whole-grain cereal is our star choice). Other excellent choices include an egg-white omelette loaded with veggies, as well as plain, nonfat yogurt topped with fresh fruit like blueberries and strawberries. Continue the day listening to your hunger and satiety cues. Only eat Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Nutrition Tips To Control Diabetes

Nutrition Tips To Control Diabetes

What kind of food you eat needs to be evaluated constantly to keep blood glucose level at the right range. Eating right is important to control diabetes. (Photo: Pixabay) New Delhi: Have you been diagnosed with diabetes? Instead of pressing the panic button and worrying about getting shots of insulin, how about incorporating a healthy diet plan to keep your blood sugar levels under control? Nutrition plays an important role in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. What kind of food you eat, its quantity and timing need to be evaluated constantly to keep blood glucose level in the desired range. "Following a healthy eating plan can not only control blood sugar levels but it can also help to manage weight and control the risk factors of heart disease and high blood pressure," says Nmami Agarwal, Celebrity Nutritionist and Dietician. While consuming food with excess calories and fats, the body responds negatively and makes the blood glucose levels shoot up. This can lead to serious problems like hyperglycemia and other long-term complications such as nerve, kidney and heart damages. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both these types are chronic diseases that impede the regulation of blood sugar or glucose in the body. While glucose keeps the body cells functioning, insulin allows the body to store and use glucose from the bloodstream. All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but they do this in different ways. While type 1 diabetes harms insulin production because the body's immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas, in type 2 diabetes, the cells are unable to make use of glucose efficiently for energy production. This occurs when blood sugar gets too high and cells became insensitive to insulin. Th Continue reading >>

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

It's no secret that type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the United States and around the world. But if you've been diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot you can do to improve your health — and the best place to start is likely by making some changes to your lifestyle. “Basic principles of good health like eating right, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy weight can be as effective as medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes for most people,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, lead medical nutrition therapist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha. That's backed up by the Look AHEAD study, a large clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers found that over a four-year period, changes like eating a healthier diet and getting more exercise led to weight loss and improved diabetes control in 5,000 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes. A December 2016 review in Diabetologia similarly found through 28 studies that participants who were able to achieve about 150 minutes per week of moderate activity lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by 26 percent compared with nonactive participants. If you're ready to make positive changes to help control diabetes, here's how to get started. Improve Your Diet to Help You Treat Type 2 Diabetes Naturally Keeping close tabs on your diet is a major way to help manage type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet for people with type 2 diabetes includes fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables, whole grains, beans, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free dairy. Focus on eating fruit and non-starchy vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, and lettuce, and having smaller portions of starchy foods, meats, and dairy products. Be especially careful about loading Continue reading >>

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