diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Common Cold

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe for Diabetes By:Diabetic Living Editors | Diabetic Living Magazine Our expert pharmacist advises how to find over-the-counter cold and flu medications that are safe for your diabetes. Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Don't Miss: What Do Artificial Sweeteners Do to Your Body? Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specif Continue reading >>

What Should A Person With Diabetes Do If They Get Sick With Flu Or Cold?

What Should A Person With Diabetes Do If They Get Sick With Flu Or Cold?

There are everyday actions people can take to stay healthy. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. Flu spreads mainly person-to-person through the coughing or sneezing of infected people. If you get sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them. Be sure to continue taking your diabetes pills or insulin. Don’t stop taking them even if you can’t eat. Your health care provider may even advise you to take more insulin during sickness. Test your blood glucose every four hours, and keep track of the results. Drink extra (calorie-free) liquids, and try to eat as you normally would. If you can’t, try to have soft foods and liquids containing the equivalent amount of carbohydrates that you usually consume. Weigh yourself every day. Losing weight without trying is a sign of high blood glucose. Check your temperature every morning and evening. A fever may be a sign of infection. Call your health care provider or go to an emergency room if any of the following happen to you: You feel too sick to eat normally and are unable to keep down food for more than 6 hours. You're having severe diarrhea. You lose 5 pounds or more. Your temperature is over 101 degrees F. Your blood glucose is lower than 60 mg/dL or remains over 300 mg/dL. You have moderate or large amounts of ketones in your urine. You're having trouble breathing. You feel sleepy or can't think clearly. For more information, see: Continue reading >>

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

The human body naturally has sugar, or glucose, in the blood. The right amount of blood sugar gives the body's cells and organs energy. The liver and muscles produce some blood sugar, but most of it comes from food and drinks that contain carbohydrates. In order to keep blood sugar levels within a normal range, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body's cells. Contents of this article: What does it feel like to have high blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is fuel for the body's organs and functions. But having high blood sugar doesn't provide a boost in energy. In fact, it's often the opposite. Because the body's cells can't access the blood sugar for energy, a person may feel tiredness, hunger, or exhaustion frequently. In addition, high sugar in the blood goes into the kidneys and urine, which attracts more water, causing frequent urination. This can also lead to increased thirst, despite drinking enough liquids. High blood sugar can cause sudden or unexplained weight loss. This occurs because the body's cells aren't getting the glucose they need, so the body burns muscle and fat for energy instead. High blood sugar can also cause numbness, burning, or tingling in the hands, legs, and feet. This is caused by diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that often occurs after many years of high blood sugar levels. What does high blood sugar mean for the rest of the body? Over time, the body's organs and systems can be harmed by high blood sugar. Blood vessels become damaged, and this can lead to complications, including: Damage to the eye and loss of vision Kidney disease or failure Nerve problems in the skin, especially the feet, leading to sores, infections, and wound healing problems Causes of high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Colds And The Flu: Your Otc Medicine Guide

Diabetes And Colds And The Flu: Your Otc Medicine Guide

Diabetes and Colds and the Flu: Your OTC Medicine Guide | Rite Aid Diabetes and Colds and the Flu: Your OTC Medicine Guide Post Date: September 2017 | Category: Diabetes Health Tips Immunizations Medicine Pharmacy If you have diabetes, you don't have to suffer with cold and flu symptoms. Learn which cold medicines can relieve your cough and congestion without affecting your blood sugar levels. Cold and flu season typically gets up and running in early fall and can last until May. It can be an especially trying time for those managing diabetes since they can be more susceptible to illness. If that weren't enough, sickness tends to cause stress, and stress hormones can affect your blood sugar. Diabetes and colds don't always mix well, but they can be safely managed. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that every person with diabetes get an annual flu shot. For added safety, the ADA recommends that people you live or spend a lot of time with get one, too, since the flu shot is not 100 percent effective. This season, stay ahead of the game and talk to a Rite Aid Pharmacist about getting flu shots for you and your whole family. In addition to keeping up with your immunizations, it's recommended that you wash your hands frequently and avoid spending time with others who are ill so you can reduce your risk of contracting something. How to Choose the Right Medications for Relief of Cold and Flu Symptoms If you do end up getting sick this season, over-the-counter medication can provide some much-needed relief, and luckily most over-the-counter (OTC) cold and flu medications are considered safe for people with diabetes, as long as they're taken as directed. Even so, you should check with your doctor or Rite Aid Pharmacist before you begin a new medication, especia Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

The cold and flu season is on its way. And while sick days bring everyone down, people with type 2 diabetes have some special considerations when they're under the weather. In addition to choosing the right cold medications and checking in with your doctor about possible dosage changes, good diabetes care means being prepared for the days when you would rather not drag yourself out of bed for a glucose check or a snack. Pick the Right Cold Medicine “A lot of [cold and flu] medications, particularly cough syrup, are high in glucose,” says internist Danny Sam, MD, the program director of the residency program at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, Calif. His practice specializes in adult diabetes. If you have diabetes, your best bet is a medicine that is clearly labeled sugar-free. Almost every major pharmacy has a store brand of sugar-free cold or cough medicine, says Dr. Sam. If you have questions, ask your pharmacist for help. Check Blood Sugar Often “Diabetes is not as well controlled when you are sick,” observes Sam. This is because when your body fights infection, it releases a chemical cascade that can alter your body’s glucose and insulin response. As a result, you may need to check your blood sugar more often than you usually do. People with type 2 diabetes may need to check their blood sugar four times a day, and should check their urine for ketones anytime their blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dL. Other medications you may need to take when you are sick can affect your blood sugar levels: Aspirin may lower blood sugar levels Certain antibiotics may decrease blood sugar levels in those taking some oral diabetes medications Decongestants may raise blood sugar levels Adjust Your Plan “You have to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and you m Continue reading >>

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

It is that time of year again and as a Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator one of the most common questions over the fall, the holiday’s and winter months is “What do you have to treat my cold?” or simply “Can you make me feel better?” Well there is no cure and we cannot wave our “therapeutic” wand and make symptoms disappear but there are a variety of products to help with the symptoms of cough and cold. If the patient is relatively healthy it may be a bit of a hit or miss scenario but usually the product will ease the symptoms until the cold runs its course over 7 to 10 days. The picture becomes less clear when the patient is taking other medications, has medical conditions such as kidney disease, blood pressure, or they have diabetes. Assisting our patient choose an appropriate product that will not worsen their existing medical conditions, and lessen the symptoms that make them feel miserable is key. Diabetes is a condition that requires some adjusting to choose the right product. It is not always a “Sugar free”, “Natural”, or alternative product that is best, as active ingredients may have issues. These include raising blood sugars, raising blood pressure or stressing the kidneys (common issues with diabetes). Usually after a brief discussion to educate the patient, a product can be chosen to help both their symptoms and minimally impact their diabetes and blood sugars. The discussion that follows is a practical approach on how to decide what a person with diabetes can use so that they understand why we avoid certain classes of products due to a their existing medical conditions. Blood Sugars Can Rise when Ill It is important to realize that when a person with diabetes is “fighting” a cold it produces stresses on the body as a whole and Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Can Sometimes Look Like The Flu

Why Diabetes Can Sometimes Look Like The Flu

Why Diabetes Can Sometimes Look Like the Flu Why Diabetes Can Sometimes Look Like the Flu Today is World Diabetes Day , turning the spotlight on this silent killer of almost 5 million people worldwide each year. In the U.S. alone, 25.8 million people suffer from diabetes, including 7 million people who dont even know they have it. And the number is growing, with two million adults newly diagnosed every year. Today is World Diabetes Day , turning the spotlight on this silent killer of almost 5 million people worldwide each year. In the U.S. alone, 25.8 million people suffer from diabetes, including 7 million people who dont even know they have it. And the number is growing, with two million adults newly diagnosed every year. While the most common complications of diabetes , such as heart attack and stroke, can be years in the making, other severe complications can come on suddenly and may even be mistaken for something as commonplace as the flu. In this video, Deborah, a 57-year-old who didn't know she had type 2 diabetes , talks about how she was diagnosed with the disease. At first she went to her doctor for a sore throat, but was so sick she eventually went to the hospital. In fact, her blood sugar had soared to 10 times what it should have been, andshe began t to slip into a diabetic coma.She woke up in the intensive care unit. Fortunately, Deborah recovered to tell her story, but not all people are so lucky. Uncontrolled high blood sugar can cause both diabetic ketoacidosis and diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome, both of which can lead to a diabetic coma, which can be fatal. This state is a life-threatening emergency, said Spyros Mezitis, MD, PhD, an endocrinology consultant and clinical investigator at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Diabetic hyperosmolar syndro Continue reading >>

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Whether your head feels like it's stuffed with cotton because you have a cold or you're spending a lot of time on the toilet because of a stomach bug, being sick is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, being sick can also affect blood sugar levels. The good news is that taking a few extra precautions can help you keep your blood sugar levels under control. When you get sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. Some illnesses cause the opposite problem, though. If you don't feel like eating or have nausea or vomiting, and you're taking the same amount of insulin you normally do, you can develop blood sugar levels that are too low. Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable when you're sick. Because you can't be sure how the illness will affect your blood sugar levels, it's important to check blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust your insulin doses as needed. Your diabetes management plan will help you know what to do when you're sick. The plan might tell you: how to monitor your blood glucose levels and ketones when you're sick what changes you might make to your food and drink and diabetes medications In addition, people with diabetes should get the pneumococcal vaccine, which protects against some serious infections. You should also get a flu shot every year. These vaccines may help you keep your diabetes under better control and cut down on the number of sick d Continue reading >>

Cold, Flu And Other Infections

Cold, Flu And Other Infections

It is a good idea to develop an action plan in anticipation of sick days, with your healthcare team. An acute disease almost always raises blood glucose (sugar) levels because of: the secretion of stress hormones (also known as counterregulatory hormones: primarily cortisol, adrenaline and glucagon), which have an insulin-antagonistic effect; less regular exercise, which makes the injected insulin less effective, even if the amount of food consumed is reduced. Sick days on insulin The daily insulin needs of people with diabetes often rise when they get sick. Consequently, even though diabetics may eat less when ill, they still need to take their regular insulin doses as prescribed, or adjusted, by their doctors. Advice and adjustments Take your blood glucose (sugar) readings more often: every 2-4 hours, or more often if necessary. Take your insulin or diabetes medication as usual, unless advised otherwise by your doctor. Take your temperature: if needed, take acetaminophen to lower your temperature and prevent dehydration through sweating caused by fever. If you have type 1 diabetes: if your blood glucose (sugar) is above 14.0 mmol/L, measure the ketones in your blood or urine every 2 to 4 hours, or more often if necessary. Diet: If you lose your appetite, drink liquid or semi-liquid sources of carbohydrates (fruit sauces, yogurt, etc.) at the rate of 15 g of carbohydrates per hour if you have taken the proper insulin doses. Hydration: If your blood glucose (sugar) level is high: Drink lots of unsweetened liquids (sparkling water, diet soft drinks, bouillon, etc.) to avoid becoming dehydrated, at the rate of 250 ml every hour. If your blood glucose (sugar) levels tend to fall: Have small amounts at a time of sweetened foods (fruit juice, regular Jell-OTM, milk, etc.). S Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How To Safely Take Otc Medicines For Cold Or Flu

Diabetes: How To Safely Take Otc Medicines For Cold Or Flu

Author: constancebrownriggs Categories Diabetes , Health Tags Antihistamines , Blood Glucose , Cold , Cough Suppressants , Diabetes , Expectorants , Flu , OTC Medicine , Pain Relievers , Sick Day Plan Youve got a runny nose, sore throat, chest discomfort and fever. Is it a cold or the flu? The common cold and seasonal flu are both respiratory illnesses caused by viral infections. While they share many of the same symptoms, it can be difficult to distinguish a cold from the flu based on symptoms alone. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms are more common and intense. The flu has an abrupt onset with more severe symptoms while a cold has a gradual onset and milder symptoms, says Georgia based pharmacist Sara (Mandy) Reece, PharmD, CDE, BC-ADM, FAADE. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems. However, when you have diabetes, even a minor cold can make your diabetes harder to control and lead to serious complications. Thats why its essential to have a sick day plan . Ideally, you will talk with your healthcare team so they can individualize your plan of care before you get sick. Reece who is Vice Chair and Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice at the Georgia Campus Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (GA-PCOM) School of Pharmacy says Common cold symptoms include sneezing, stuffy nose, sore throat, mild to moderate chest discomfort and cough. Over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications can be used to relieve these symptoms. When considering which combination cold and cough product to purchase Reese says select the product with the least number of primary ingredients to treat your symptoms. Over-the-counter cold medicines include nasal decongestants, cough suppressants, expectorants, antihistamines, and pain relievers. Choose Continue reading >>

Managing Your Child's Diabetes On Sick Days

Managing Your Child's Diabetes On Sick Days

Managing Your Child's Diabetes on Sick Days KidsHealth / For Parents / Managing Your Child's Diabetes on Sick Days en espaolControlar la diabetes de su hijo cuando est enfermo Kids with diabetes get sick once in a while, just like other kids. However, because the effects of illness on the body can raise or lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, a few extra precautions are needed to keep blood sugar levels under control. With proper planning and some advice from your doctor, you'll be prepared to handle sick days with confidence. When your child gets sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. While stress tends to make blood sugar rise in people with diabetes, some illnesses cause loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting. The poor intake of food in such cases can result in low blood sugar levels in someone taking the usual doses of insulin . In a nutshell: Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable on sick days. Because you can't be sure exactly how the illness will affect your child's diabetes control, it's important to check your child's blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust insulin doses as needed. Your child's diabetes health care team will include sick-day instructions in the diabetes management plan, which might include: how to monitor both blood sugar levels and ketones when your child is sick which over-the-counter and prescription medicines are OK to give Continue reading >>

Battling Winter Colds And Illness When Type 1 Diabetic

Battling Winter Colds And Illness When Type 1 Diabetic

My carefully laid training plans were recently axed by a “stinking cold” that seemed to go round amongst colleagues and friends. What started off with body aches on a Friday, feeling cold and having headaches on a Saturday, had turned into a proper cold by Sunday with all the common symptoms: Runny nose, cough, congestion, headaches, sneezing and feeling generally quite lousy. And with that started a new challenge altogether: Managing my diabetes! From incubation to outbreak – Blood sugar observations As the weekend progressed, my sugar levels became gradually harder to manage until, eventually, with the outbreak of the cold, they were staying up at around 200-220mg/dl (11-12mmol/l). Any slow-release carbohydrates I would eat and cover with short-acting insulin (bolus) would send levels even higher within 30-60 minutes of injecting. My body had become highly insulin resistant and my diabetes an uncontrollable beast! Real life example: Day 2 of the cold and blood sugar levels My target range is shown in gray; levels between 85-140mg/dl (4.7-7.5mmol/l). I generally have good control with HbA1c results of ca 6.2%. When illness strikes however, chaos rules: Below graph shows how elevated glucose levels were despite: A temporary basal rate at 140-150% from waking up throughout the day until early evening an additional circa 15 -20 units of correction with short-acting insulin over the course of the day Little carbohydrate intake Notice the spike from 160mg/dl (8.9mmol/l) to 271mg/dl (15mmol/l) around 19:00 (7 pm)? This came after eating 12 grams of COH in form of Pumpernickel bread – and carbohydrates were measured correctly. This required significant correction with short-acting insulin (no ketones present). Illness, food and Type 1 don’t go well together. The bod Continue reading >>

Cold And Flu And What To Do

Cold And Flu And What To Do

Getting sick can be scary and especially when you or a loved one is Type 1. As the body tries to fight off the virus, blood glucose levels elevate, causing rapid and dangerous highs. And when youre not feeling well, you may find it difficult to keep down fluids or even eat, causing you to go too low. Then theres the issue of medicine which to take and how to dose for it if needed. Theres a lot to consider, but rest assured! Weve talked to doctors about what is recommended in terms of planning ahead and the protocol if you or your loved one are faced with a bug. While this season brings with it challenges to staying healthy, here are some helpful guidelines when facing off with the cold or flu. Whatsthedifference between a cold and flu? A cold is a milder respiratory infection than a flu. While both can cause a soar throat, cough, runny nose and congestion, a flu is usually accompanied by body aches, fever and lasts much longer than a common cold. As a Type 1 or as a caretaker of a Type 1, you should plan ahead so youre readynot only for the cold, a common and frequent ailment, but also, the more unruly cousin the flu, who outstays his welcome and can cause serious havoc if left unchecked. lists of recommended medications you can taketo alleviatecertain symptoms the contact of your doctor and when / where they can be reached during regular hours as well as holiday time a plan of action (if / then scenarios), how often you should check your BGLs and whenyou should contact a doctor. low-calorie sports drinks (for fast-acting sugars and electrolytes) These are usually offered in the fall and are highly recommended for anyone who is at higher risk for complications if they contract influenza. Youve heard it a million times, but it really is one of the best ways to prevent c Continue reading >>

How To Survive The Common Cold With Diabetes

How To Survive The Common Cold With Diabetes

Home Living Well With Diabetes -Articles How to survive the common cold with diabetes How to survive the common cold with diabetes Woman Suffering From Cold Lying In Bed With Tissue Having a cold is never fun. But when you have diabetes and a cold theres an added risk to all that sniffing and sneezing: as your body sends out extra hormones to fight infection, it can alter your bodys sugar and insulin response. This in turn can dangerously increase your blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar levels get too high (a condition called hyperglycemia) they can cause damage to your nerves, blood vessels and organs. When the levels stay high for too long, it can trigger a condition called ketoacidosis which can be life-threatening. The good news is, even with a bad cold, implementing some key strategies below can get you back on track before your blood sugar levels get out of whack. When youre sick with a cold, its especially important to check your blood sugar at least every three to four hours. That way if your levels arent at target, you can talk to your healthcare provider to adjust your diabetes management plan as needed. This could mean temporarily using more insulin to get your blood sugar levels down. To prevent your blood sugars from going too far down the other way, be sure to keep eating nutritious foods even if you dont feel hungry. If youre vomiting, have diarrhea or a fever, try and drink a cup of fluid each hour to avoid dehydration. Choose liquids that are sugar-free if your blood glucose is above the normal target level, or choose sugar-containing fluids if your blood glucose is below the normal target. And remember to take the time to rest. This will help your body to focus its energy on fighting this cold. Of course, if any of these symptoms worsen, be sur Continue reading >>

How To Treat Cold And Flu Symptoms If You Have Diabetes

How To Treat Cold And Flu Symptoms If You Have Diabetes

How to Treat Cold and Flu Symptoms If You Have Diabetes By Debra Manzella, RN | Reviewed by a board-certified physician People with diabetes are at increased risk of being infected with the cold or flu virus because their immune systems can be weaker than someone else who does not have diabetes. To complicate matters, it can be hard to keep blood sugars controlled when you get sick. While the body tries to fight the illness, hormones are released that cause blood sugars to rise and interfere with the blood-glucose lowering effects of insulin, making diabetes harder to control. How you manage your diabetes when you are sick is important. Medications for Treating Cold and Flu Symptoms in Diabetics One of the questions that comes up often is, what can someone with diabetes take that is over the counter if they do get sick? This can be confusing because there are so many brands of cold and flu medications to choose from. You can buy single symptom medicines that treat just coughs or just nasal congestion. Or you can buy a product that will help with several symptoms at once. The trick is to know what ingredients are in the medications that you buy, and how they will affect your diabetes. Ingredients on the labels fall under two categories: inactive and active. Inactive ingredients don't have medicinal value. They are typically fillers, flavorings, colorings, and substances that help with consistency. Active ingredients are the drugs that actually treat the symptoms. Find out the ingredients of your typical over-the-counter medicines and how they can affect your diabetes: Inactive IngredientsThat May Affect Diabetes Alcohol or sugar are non-pharmacological ingredients that may be in the cold and flu medicine you are taking. They may be listed under "inactive ingredients" on Continue reading >>

More in diabetes