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Diabetes Commercial 2017

Community Health And Diabetes Fest

Community Health And Diabetes Fest

Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center is owned and operated by a subsidiary of Universal Health Services, Inc. (UHS), a King of Prussia, PA-based company, that is one of the largest healthcare management companies in the nation. The information on this website is provided as general health guidelines and may not be applicable to your particular health condition. Your individual health status and any required medical treatments can only be properly addressed by a professional healthcare provider of your choice. Remember: There is no adequate substitution for a personal consultation with your physician. Neither Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center, or any of their affiliates, nor any contributors shall have any liability for the content or any errors or omissions in the information provided by this website. The information, content and artwork provided by this website is intended for non-commercial use by the reader. The reader is permitted to make one copy of the information displayed for his/her own non-commercial use. The making of additional copies is prohibited. Continue reading >>

Programs Help Blunt Memphis' Diabetes Epidemic

Programs Help Blunt Memphis' Diabetes Epidemic

FacebookEmail Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Pinterest Programs help blunt Memphis' diabetes epidemic With diet and exercise, local residents who had been pre-diabetic lower their blood-sugar levels to the normal range. Programs help blunt Memphis' diabetes epidemic With diet and exercise, local residents who had been pre-diabetic lower their blood-sugar levels to the normal range. Check out this story on commercialappeal.com: A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Programs help blunt Memphis' diabetes epidemic Tom Charlier , USA TODAY NETWORK Tennessee Published 10:00 a.m. CT March 11, 2017 Lisa Miller and Sanford Miller enrolled in a Methodist Hospital's diabetes prevention program each loosing over 20 pounds after Sanford was diagnosed prediabetic and both registered high cholesterol. (Photo: Jim Weber, The Commercial Appeal)Buy Photo Construction worker Sanford Miller rarely ate a midday mealthat didn't include a fast-food burger andfries because, as he says, "that's what you did for lunch." With his weight, cholesteroland blood-sugar levels surging, Miller, 56, decided to make a change. He and his wife Lisa joined a diabetes-prevention class at Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospitaland began taking walks and eatinga more healthful diet. TheMemphis native and Olive Branch resident not only shed nearly 30 pounds, but lowered hisblood-sugar levels from the pre-diabetes range to normal. Much like Miller, Michelle Norman says she was"absolutely" destined fordiabetes, what with her family history and struggles to manage weight. But that was before she became an exercise devotee, bicycling up to 150 miles at a time and leading a regular Zumba class.Although still considered pre-diabetic, the 49-year-old Whitehaven r Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

New Campaign Urges Millions To Check For Prediabetes

New Campaign Urges Millions To Check For Prediabetes

Are you at risk from prediabetes? Millions of Americans are and don't even know it. Prediabetes is a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes, so stopping it is important. Now four big players in the world of health are joining forces to raise awareness and share prevention messages. They're using a little humor along the way, too. Together, the American Diabetes Association, the American Medical Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Ad Council have launched the first national public service advertising (PSA) campaign to raise awareness about prediabetes. "Eighty-six million people have prediabetes and only 10 percent know they have it," CDC Diabetes Translation Director Ann Albright told CBS News. That's more than one in three Americans, she added. "No one is excused from prediabetes." People with prediabetes have higher than normal blood glucose (sugar) levels, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The ad campaign walk people through a few questions so they can find out, even as they watch the videos, if they're at risk. In one of the ads, a slightly goofy doctor asks viewers to count off on their hands, raising one finger at a time, every time they answer a question with a "yes." The questions: Are you a man? Are you over 60? Are you inactive? Are you overweight? Does type 2 diabetes run in your family? And so on. If you're holding up more than five fingers by the end of the ad, you need to see a doctor and get checked for prediabetes. "People are actually taking action when they're viewing the PSA," said Albright. In other ads, the doctor talks to some typical prediabetes patients - the busy mom, the guy stuck in traffic, the slightly tubby "bacon lover" - who are surprised to hear they're not exempt. Now that Continue reading >>

Can You Be A Pilot With Diabetes?

Can You Be A Pilot With Diabetes?

Update: On May 1, 2017, a new medical program called BasicMed went into effect that drastically changed the medical requirements for most class 3 certificated private pilots. For more information visit the following link: FAA changes can be found here In this article we will explore whether or not you can become a pilot if you have diabetes. We will look at piloting for a commercial airline with diabetes and piloting for a private company with diabetes. We will also look at other jobs centered on aviation, such as being a flight instructor, or flying gliders and other small aircraft. We will look at whether or not you can pilot an aircraft if you have Type 1, Type 2, or pre-diabetes. We will look at whether or not it matters if you are taking insulin, other injections for diabetes, oral medications, or are diet and exercise controlled. We have already been looking at some promising careers that we can have with diabetes that is well-controlled. We have looked at being a long-distance truck driver, an EMS/Paramedic, a Firefighter, an air traffic controller, and a law enforcement officer. We have looked at whether or not you can be in the military with diabetes. Now we take on the most difficult career to date. *Becoming a commercial airline pilot with diabetes requiring insulin is prohibited by a blanket ban in the United States. It is one of 15 conditions that can disqualify you when you go for your medical certificate with the FAA. So what’s up? Let’s look… Type 1 or Type 2 insulin requiring diabetes The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) licenses all pilots in the US, and they provide Class 1, Class 2, Class 3 medical certificates. A person with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes requiring insulin is exempt from the possibility of obtaining a Class 1 or 2 medical cert Continue reading >>

End Diabetes Music Video From Diabetes Canada - Video - News 1130

End Diabetes Music Video From Diabetes Canada - Video - News 1130

End Diabetes music video from Diabetes Canada 2440 Ash St. Vancouver, BC V5Z 4J6 1996-2018 Rogers Media. All rights reserved. We've sent an email with instructions to create a new password. Your existing password has not been changed. We'll send you a link to create a new password. {* #legalAcceptancePostLoginForm_radio *} {* name *} {* email *} {* postalCode *} {* gender *} {* birthdate_required *} Daily updates for Weather, Traffic, New, and Entertainment Send me promotions, surveys and info from NEWS 1130 and other Rogers brands. Send me alerts, event notifications and special deals or information from our carefully screened partners that may be of interest to me. I understand that I can withdraw my consent at any time By clicking Confirm Account, I agree to the terms of service and privacy policy of Rogers Media. {* backButton *} {* legalAcceptanceAcceptButton *} You have activated your account, please feel free to browse our exclusive contests, videos and content. You have activated your account, please feel free to browse our exclusive contests, videos and content. An error has occurred while trying to update your details. Please contact us . Please confirm the information below before signing up. {* #socialRegistrationForm_radio_2 *} {* socialRegistration_firstName *} {* socialRegistration_lastName *} {* socialRegistration_emailAddress *} {* socialRegistration_displayName *} {* socialRegistration_postalCode *} {* socialRegistration_gender *} {* socialRegistration_birthdate_required *} Daily updates for Weather, Traffic, New, and Entertainment Send me promotions, surveys and info from NEWS 1130 and other Rogers brands. Send me alerts, event notifications and special deals or information from our carefully screened partners that may be of interest to me. I underst Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

New Apple Ad Features Dexcom: Here Is Why That Is Important To You

New Apple Ad Features Dexcom: Here Is Why That Is Important To You

New Apple Ad Features Dexcom: Here Is Why That Is Important to You People living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are understandably excited to hear the words,my daughter was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetesin an Apple ad, but that is just the beginning of why this Apple Watch advertisement should get your heart pumping. The percentage of people with T1D using continuous glucose monitoring technology is still relatively low. The barriers to adoption are multi-variable. Cost, lack of insurance coverage, misunderstanding of what the technology brings to your life and plain just not knowing that it exists are but a few. The truth, however, is that even if you never find your way to a CGM, this quick video, in my opinion, should still make you happy. Heres why. We finally have a device manufacturer in the diabetes world who moved beyond the diabetes world. When Dexcom searched for others whose collaboration might improve their product,they didnt just form a relationship with a little start-up.They formed a relationship with Apple. The mention of Apple Watch integration with Dexcom in this ad, in my opinion, is not random. The mention didnt happen just because someone wrote a letter. It is there on purpose.This is Apple telling us what is important to them and a signal of where they are focusing their efforts when it comes to the health space. The company that put a smartphone into most every hand on the planet and the company that is hugely responsible for the technology that keeps my daughter healthy, they are dating. I think we are all going to like what their future children grow up to be. Im even more excited when I think about the relationship that Dexcom has with Omnipod and the ways that the Apple connection could improve all aspects of the tech that helps to keep Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Diabetes And Private And Commercial Driving

Guidelines For Diabetes And Private And Commercial Driving

Diabetes & You > Healthy Living Resources > General Tips > Guidelines for Diabetes and Private and Commercial Driving Guidelines for Diabetes and Private and Commercial Driving Each province has its own rules regarding glucose (sugar) control and being able to drive. The following recommendations were published in the June 2003 issue of the Canadian Journal of Diabetes. You can also download and view the complete article entitled, Canadian Diabetes Associations Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes and Private and Commercial Driving . Diabetes may affect driving performance due to chronic complications, which may impair sensory or motor function (diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney disease (nephropathy), cardiovascular disease (CVD), peripheral vascular disease and stroke) and because of incidents of hypoglycemia. As the presence and extent of these factors vary from person to person, the Canadian Diabetes Association maintains the following position on Driving and Licensing: People with diabetes have the right to be assessed for a license to drive a motor vehicle on an individual basis in accordance with Canadian Diabetes Association guidelines for private and commercial driving. In assessing the suitability of people with diabetes to drive, medical evaluations are needed to document any complications and to assess blood glucose (sugar) control, including the frequency and severity of any hypoglycemic incidents. Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose (sugar) levels. Hypoglycemia can adversely affect driving performance and may contribute to some of the accidents that involve people with diabetes. The risk of severe hypoglycemia is greatest in people with type 1 diabetes who are using intensive insulin therapy (IIT), especially those Continue reading >>

Alabamian With Diabetes Built Her Own Artificial Pancreas, Gives Away Plan For Free

Alabamian With Diabetes Built Her Own Artificial Pancreas, Gives Away Plan For Free

Alabamian with diabetes built her own artificial pancreas, gives away plan for free Dana Lewis shows the artificial pancreas she invented to help people with diabetes handle their disease. (Contributed photo) Dana Lewis is a good name to remember the next time you hear somebody say Alabama's mostly good for football and barbecue. Lewis, a University of Alabama graduate who grew up in Huntsville, used social media, computer skills and mail-order parts to invent an artificial pancreas for people with diabetes. Along with co-inventor and husband Scott Leibrand, she's now giving her discovery away. The device is a success - hundreds of people are using it, including Lewis - and it is bringing the young inventors increasing attention. Just this spring, Fast Company put the 28-year-old Lewis on its 2017 list of America's 100 "most creative people in business." Diabetes is caused when the pancreas fails to make the insulin that helps the body turn glucose from sugar and carbohydrates into energy. Without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood stream. With too much insulin, it can fall to dangerously low levels. For diabetics, staying in the safe center is a constant challenge. "You really do make hundreds of decisions a day about things that impact your blood sugar," Lewis said last week from her current home in Seattle. "It's a lot. And it really does impact everybody who cares for a person with diabetes - spouses, siblings, parents, grandparents. Oftentimes, a person with diabetes is surrounded by a half-a-dozen people who help care for them and love them." Lewis was an example of that. She moved to Seattle for a job after graduating from Alabama. The daughter of a Huntsville engineer, she attended Grissom High School before going to Tuscaloosa. Dana Lewis speaking about her Continue reading >>

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet — we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. So find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Join the National DPP You're not alone in this. There are hundreds of Diabetes Prevention Programs in local communities that are proven to help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. We're sure there's one that's right for you. "But I'm a busy mom...I don't have time to eat right and exercise!" Yes, making lifestyle changes may seem hard. But it doesn’t have to be. In fact, some of them can even be fun. Continue reading >>

How To Make Informed Decisions From Diabetes Commercials

How To Make Informed Decisions From Diabetes Commercials

How to make informed decisions from diabetes commercials Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C Memorable diabetes television commercials are often shared widely online. Staying informed about the topics they cover, and understanding key things to look out for, may help people make positive choices about how they manage their condition. Many people have seen the diabetes commercial where Wilford Brimley, an actor with diabetes , pronounces diabetes in an unusual way. The commercial has been parodied multiple times, which can lead to misinformation about what it is trying to say. However, it may be a useful source of information for people with diabetes. This article explores what qualities good diabetes commercials should have. It also gives examples of some of the best adverts for people with diabetes. The discussion that follows highlights things that people with diabetes should look out for in diabetes commercials. This is to help ensure they have the right information to make the best decisions about what they choose to buy. Diabetes commercials must be emotive and memorable if the viewer is expected to engage with the product or service. From a business standpoint, a good commercial needs to have an impact on the audience. It needs to inform the audience about the product or service it wants them to engage with. From the viewer's perspective, a good diabetes commercial will be: One of the best ways that commercials for diabetes spread awareness is through the use of celebrity endorsements. Letting a celebrity with diabetes explain a product helps the viewer in two ways: it reassures by adding a familiar face to a daunting topic it makes the condition acceptable when someone well-known is seen coping with it Celebrities also help to familiarize users with the Continue reading >>

Toujeo Tv Commercial, 'daily Groove'

Toujeo Tv Commercial, 'daily Groove'

Data is based on life of ad, unless indicated otherwise Data is based on life of ad, unless indicated otherwise Data is based on life of ad, unless indicated otherwise Data is based on life of ad, unless indicated otherwise About Toujeo TV Commercial, 'Daily Groove' The once-daily Toujeo injection, along with diet and exercise, may help those with diabetes better control their blood sugar. For one man, Toujeo helps him find his daily groove as he dances through his day to a cover of Earth, Wind & Fire's "Let's Groove" while cooking, working, mowing the lawn and taking his dog for a walk. Well give you a glimpse of more of our powerful real-time ad analytics. Sorry, we only accept work mail accounts. Please check your email and click on the verify link it will return you right back to this page with the data unlocked. Sorry, we do not accept free email accounts. Please check your email and click on the verify link it will return you right back to this page with the data unlocked. Ready for the big time? Request a trial of the iSpot TV Ad Analytics platform. You've hit your data view limit. Time to upgrade to the full iSpot TV Ad Analytics platform. Submissions should come only from the actors themselves, their parent/legal guardian or casting agency. Please include at least one social/website link containing a recent photo of the actor. Submissions without photos may not be accepted. Voice over actors: provide a link to your professional website containing your reel. Submit ONCE per commercial, and allow 48 to 72 hours for your request to be processed. Continue reading >>

Wilford Brimley

Wilford Brimley

Anthony Wilford Brimley (born September 27, 1934),[1] credited either as A. Wilford Brimley or Wilford Brimley, is an American actor. He has appeared in many notable films including The China Syndrome (1979), The Thing (1982), The Natural (1984), Cocoon (1985) and The Firm (1993). He had a recurring role on the 1970s television series The Waltons. Brimley has type 2 adult-onset diabetes,[2] and has appeared in related commercials for Liberty Medical. He has also done television advertisements for the Quaker Oats Company.[3] Early life[edit] Brimley was born Anthony Wilford Brimley in Salt Lake City, Utah, on September 27, 1934,[3] where his father worked as a real estate broker.[4] Prior to his career in acting, Brimley dropped out of high school to serve in the United States Marine Corps, where he served in the Aleutian Islands for three years. He also worked as a bodyguard for Howard Hughes,[5] a ranch hand, a wrangler, and a blacksmith.[1] He then began shoeing horses for film and television. He began acting in the 1960s as a riding extra in Westerns and a stunt man at the urging of his friend, actor Robert Duvall.[6] Brimley married his first wife, the former Lynne Bagley, on July 6, 1956. They had four sons together (James Charles, John Michael, William Carmen and Lawrence Dean) and several grandchildren. Brimley and Lynne were married until her death in June 2000.[7] Brimley married Beverly Berry on October 31, 2007.[8] Together they have lived in Greybull, Wyoming and Santa Clara, Utah. In 2009, they founded nonprofit organization Hands Across the Saddle (HATS) in the Big Horn Basin.[9] Career[edit] Brimley's onscreen breakthrough came when he was cast in the popular 1970s television series The Waltons as Walton's Mountain resident Horace Brimley; he made seven a Continue reading >>

New Prediabetes Awareness Campaign Features Unexpected Animal Videos To Encourage Americans To Learn Their Risk

New Prediabetes Awareness Campaign Features Unexpected Animal Videos To Encourage Americans To Learn Their Risk

New York, NY, July 25, 2017: Building on a successful campaign that helped hundreds of thousands of Americans learn their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through campaign messaging and an online risk test, the first-of-its-kind initiative to raise national awareness of prediabetes returns with an entertaining new approach. The new campaign, launching today, encourages viewers to take a one-minute prediabetes risk test to know where they stand and discover how they can decrease their risk of developing type 2 diabetes — and it does so with some adorable helpers. More than one in three American adults has prediabetes — a serious health condition that often leads to type 2 diabetes and other significant health conditions like blindness, heart attack or stroke. According to newly released CDC data, however, nearly 90 percent of the 84 million people with prediabetes don’t know they have it and aren’t aware of the long-term risks to their health. Currently, about 30 million Americans are living with diabetes. The new campaign, once again developed pro bono by Ogilvy New York for the Ad Council campaign, features puppies, hedgehogs and baby goats. The new, lighthearted PSAs offer viewers a “perfect way to spend a minute” where they can learn where they stand by taking the one-minute prediabetes risk test while also doing something everyone loves — watching adorable animal videos. The campaign highlights that it’s important to speak with a doctor and visit DoIHavePrediabetes.org to learn more about prediabetes. The positive message behind the campaign is that prediabetes can often be reversed by making everyday lifestyle changes. Diagnosis is key, as research shows that people who are aware of their condition are more likely to make the necessary long-term l Continue reading >>

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