diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil And Fighting Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Fighting Diabetes

More and more Americans are suffering from Diabetes. The great news is that coconut oil can help with how we deal with Diabetes. Coconut oil impacts blood sugar levels which often swing wildly based on the food eaten. Unfortunately, we have such poor quality diets in the U.S. as well as a proliferation of poor quality food. Diabetics are often required to take their blood sugar levels regularly. When blood sugar levels spike (due to eating the wrong foods), a dose of medication is often the solution to help regulate blood sugar levels. Some people have opted not to take medication and to instead take 2-3 tablespoons of coconut oil. The coconut oil acts as a blood sugar regulator acting in as little as 30 minutes to bring blood sugar levels back done to appropriate levels. Another way to utilize coconut oil to help manage Diabetes is to replace polyunsaturated vegetable oils in the diet with pure, extra virgin coconut oil. In 1998 there was a study done on precisely this idea in India. Researchers measured the implications of replacing a diet rich in coconut oil with polyunsaturated vegetable fats. The researchers found that diabetes rates that had previously been nonexistent shot up almost immediately. The western diet can sure learn a lot from other cultures! Continue reading >>

Virgin Coconut Oil Remedy For Diabetes

Virgin Coconut Oil Remedy For Diabetes

Coconut oil was said to be the healthiest oil in the planet. When Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO) was first introduced, it has become the best oil that you can use for your diet. Various researchers studied the effects of coconut oil. Bruce Fife, C.N. N.D. (Healing Miracles of Coconut Oil) concluded that there is one oil that a diabetic can take without fear, and that is coconut oil. Check: The Coconut Oil Secrets But how does Virgin Coconut Oil works in diabetes treatment? Here’s an excerpt from Bruce Fife in his conclusion about consumption of coconut oil: As mentioned earlier in this chapter, coconut oil puts less of a demand on the enzyme production of the pancreas. This lessens the stress on the pancreas during mealtime when insulin is produced most heavily, thus allowing the organ to function more efficiently. Coconut Oil also helps supply energy to cells because it is easily absorbed without the need of enzymes or insulin. It has been shown to improve insulin secretion and utilisation of blood glucose. Coconut oil in the diet enhances insulin action and improves binding affinity compared to other oils. The Journal of the Indian Medical Association has reported that Type II diabetes in India has increased as the people have abandoned traditional oils, like coconut oil, in favour of polyunsaturated vegetable oils which have been promoted as “heart-friendly.” The authors comment on the link between polyunsaturated oils and diabetes and recommend increasing coconut oil consumption as a means to prevent diabetes. There are actually lots of people who have experimented coconut oil in treating their diabetes. Dr. Nigel Turner and his associate Jiming Ye from Garvan Institute of Medical Research in 2009 also demonstrated that a diet rich in coconut oil helps protects the Continue reading >>

Is Virgin Coconut Oil Good For Diabetics?

Is Virgin Coconut Oil Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a metabolic condition characterized by inadequate use or production of insulin. Although it's incurable, it is treatable through exercise, foot care, medication, blood-glucose monitoring and blood-pressure, weight and cholesterol control. Accordingly, it's best to avoid oils, which can increase triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Coconut oil is an exception, potentially benefiting those with diabetes. Video of the Day Cellular Absorption of Energy Insulin is an enzyme you need to absorb energy from carbohydrates. When you eat carbohydrates, your body converts them to glucose. Once glucose enters the bloodstream, your pancreas releases insulin, which signals cells to absorb the glucose. The cells release another enzyme, carnitine tranferase, which allows the glucose to enter the mitochondria, which are the cell engines. The glucose fuels the mitochondria, thereby fueling the cells. Some metabolic conditions cause insulin resistance, whereby cells do not respond to insulin normally, so their glucose absorption is inadequate or nonexistent. Medium-Chain Fatty Acids Coconut oil contains medium-chain fatty acids, instead of long-chain fatty acids found in most other saturated fats. Medium-chain fatty acids are small enough to permeate both cell and mitochondrial membranes, Bruce Fife writes in "The Coconut Oil Miracle." Therefore, it requires no insulin release, which is usually necessary for cell absorption. Neither does it require carnitine transferase, which is usually essential for entry into the mitochondria. In other words, coconut oil is a source of fast-absorbing fuel that is very low on the glycemic index, which is optimal for those with diabetes. Not all kinds of coconut oil are equally beneficial. Unrefined virgin coconut oil is the most beneficial fo Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil Could Reduce The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Coconut Oil Could Reduce The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

A diet including coconut oil, a medium chain fatty acid (MCFA), helps combat insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the inability of cells to respond to insulin and take in glucose for energy. The pancreas tries to compensate for insulin resistance by producing even more insulin, but eventually glucose accumulates in the bloodstream. Over time, insulin resistance and obesity can lead to pre-diabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes. Dr Nigel Turner and colleagues at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Darlinghurst, Australia, compared fat metabolism and insulin resistance in mice and rats fed diets rich in coconut oil (a medium chain fatty acid) or lard (a long chain fatty acid). (The lard-based diet was similar to the diet eaten by people in the Western world.) The findings were published in the journal Diabetes. MCFAs, like in coconut oil, were found to reduce fat accumulation while maintaining insulin action in muscle and fat tissue. “Dietary supplementation with MCFAs may therefore be beneficial for preventing obesity and peripheral insulin resistance”, said Dr. Turner in the study conclusions. The saturated fats present in coconut oil also have antimicrobial properties that help combat various bacteria, fungi, and parasites that cause indigestion. Coconut oil also helps in absorption of other nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. The MCFAs in coconut oil are more like carbohydrates than other fats. They are more water soluble and are broken down more quickly. They enter the bloodstream faster and are taken directly to the liver, where they are used as an immediate source of energy. Medium chain fatty acids, unlike long chain fatty acids, are small enough to enter the cells’ energy powerhouses, the mitochondria, directly, where they c Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil Effective In Treating Diabetes

Coconut Oil Effective In Treating Diabetes

Indeed Virgin Coconut Oil has a substantial effect on blood sugar levels. My wife and daughter (both have type 2 diabetes) measure their blood sugar levels at least three times a day. When they eat the wrong foods and their blood sugar levels get to 80-100 points above normal, they don’t take extra medication, they take 2-3 tablespoons of the coconut oil directly from the bottle. Within a half hour their blood sugar levels will come back to normal. Ed, Coconut Diet Forums Diabetes Epidemic 25.8 million children and adults in the United States, 8.3% of the population, have diabetes.1 The current rate of people becoming diabetic in the United states is doubling every 10 years. This has resulted in a windfall for pharmaceutical companies capitalizing on this “disease” with drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes, but not deal with the underlying cause. These drugs have serious side effects. One of the most popular diabetes drugs, Avandia, was pulled off the market in 2011 after a number of studies showed that the drug increased the risk of heart attacks among type 2 diabetes patients. The manufacturer of the drug reached a $3 billion settlement in December 2011 over its fraudulent marketing of the drug, the largest federal criminal drug-company settlement to date. Coconut Oil and Type 2 Diabetes Information that is finally making its way into the mainstream media is that type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle and diet issue that can be reversed without drugs. This information has been known for years, however, among those in the alternative health crowd. Consider these testimonials (some over 10 years ago) from individuals who did not follow typical doctor’s advice: I also wanted to pass along a bit of my experience in regard to diabetes. I have been taking Coconut Oil (CO Continue reading >>

The Coconut Craze: Coconut Oil

The Coconut Craze: Coconut Oil

Last week I wrote about coconut water. I’m curious — how many of you drink coconut water, or have at least tried it? As I mentioned in my posting, I’m not a big fan of it. But unless you’re guzzling down glass after glass of this tropical beverage, there are really no major harmful ramifications. But what about coconut oil? Controversial Coconut Oil Many nutrition topics are murky, and the issue of whether coconut oil is a “good” fat or a “bad” fat is a prime example. A lot of people swear by coconut oil for various reasons. Those who enjoy baking like coconut oil because it makes a mean flaky pie crust and lends a unique, rich flavor to pastries and other goodies. Others use coconut oil for everyday cooking, claiming that it adds great flavor to vegetables, oatmeal, and even popcorn. Coconut oil is used extensively in Thai and Indian dishes, which, of course, is partly why these dishes are so tasty. And then, there are those who swear by coconut oil for its supposed numerous health benefits, such as promoting weight loss, improving blood glucose control, and helping to treat heart disease. Can a tropical oil really live up to all these claims? A Bit of Background The use of coconut oil for cooking is nothing new in tropical regions. In the early 1900’s, this oil was actually used in the US as a cooking oil, but it gradually fell out of favor in the 1960’s when scientists began to examine coconut oil’s possible role in heart disease. The link between coconut oil and heart disease stems from the fact that coconut oil is primarily a saturated fat (92% of the fatty acids in this oil are saturated). And, for the most part, saturated fat, or the “bad” fat, is linked with promoting heart disease. But the tricky thing about saturated fats is that not Continue reading >>

Does Coconut Oil Help Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Coconut Oil Help Blood Sugar Levels?

Traditional in Latin and Asian cooking and made from mature coconuts, coconut oil is associated with a number of health benefits because of its medium-chain triglycerides, or MCTs. This fatty acid may help with a number of conditions, including steadying blood sugar levels. A 2009 issue of “Diabetes” published a study on the benefits of MCTs to patients with Type 1 diabetes. The animal study found that in addition to improving cognitive abilities due to low blood sugar levels, MCTs also helped steady blood sugar levels in the test subjects, thus preventing cognitive impairment. While the results were promising, further and more long-term research on human effects is still needed. Improves Glucose Tolerance The MCTs found in coconut oil may help with improving glucose tolerance. This means it may improve the body’s ability to process sugar into usable energy with fewer side effects. A 2010 issue of the "Indian Journal of Pharmacology” published an animal study that found a diet supplemented with coconut oil led to improved glucose tolerance levels, as well as a lowering of total cholesterol levels. Researchers attributed this effect to the presence of lauric acid, an MCT, in coconut oil. Protects Against Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance, in which your body produces insulin but is unable to use it properly, can lead to high blood sugar and possibly Type 2 diabetes because your body’s cells cannot absorb the glucose without insulin. A 2009 issue of “Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Review” included a four-week study that found a diet supplemented with MCTs led to less insulin sensitivity. It also resulted in less fat buildup in the body and lowered insulin resistance. These effects were seen even without dietary changes. Using Coconut Oil Because it is n Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Can You Eat Coconut Oil If You Have Diabetes? If you’re living with diabetes, you’ve likely been through the diet overhaul. Out with the rippled chips, white bread, and full-fat cheese. In with the whole-wheat toast, tofu, and celery sticks. Now you may want to replace the fats you use in your cooking. You may have heard coconut oil may be a good substitute, but you may not be sure how it would affect your diabetes. Is it better or worse? Here’s what you need to know about coconut oil and diabetes. Coconut oil, also known as copra oil, is derived from the meat of mature coconuts. The oil is rich in antioxidants and energy-boosting triglycerides, and low in cholesterol. Not only does the oil have a sweet, nutty flavor, but it also leaves behind little grease. It’s commonly used as a replacement for butter and olive or vegetable oils when baking or cooking. Coconut oil also has many cosmetic uses, such as: a natural skin moisturizer a leave-in condition for your hair an ingredient in homemade soap scrub and lotion recipes If you have diabetes, you know that maintaining a healthy weight is a key component of a diabetes meal plan. This is especially true of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes generally begins with your body’s resistance to insulin. Insulin resistance is linked to excess weight. A 2008 study found that people who consumed medium-chain fats like coconut oil as part of a weight loss plan lost more fat than participants who used olive oil. Coconut oil is high in medium-chain fats. This means coconut oil, a solid fat, is harder to convert to stored fat. This makes it easier for your body to burn it off. Although separate studies, such as this 2009 study in Lipids, have corroborated this, there isn’t enough research to definitively support this claim. Re Continue reading >>

>diabetes And Coconut Oil

>diabetes And Coconut Oil

Diabetes & Coconut Oil The excerpt below is taken from the book The Healing Miracles of Coconut Oil by Bruce Fife, N.D. and relates to the beneficial effects of coconut oil for diabetics. "The biggest culprit, however, seems to be polyunsaturated oil. [13] Studies have shown that when polyunsaturated fats from the diet are incorporated into cellular structure, the cell's ability to bind with insulin decreases, thus lowering their ability to get glucose. [14] In other words, the "locks" on the cells which open the door for glucose to enter degrade when too much polyunsaturated oil is consumed in the diet. Insulin is then unable to open the door. Polyunsaturated oils are easily oxidized and damaged by free radicals. Fats of all types, including polyunsaturated oils, are used as building blocks for cell membranes. Oxidized polyunsaturated fats in the cell membrane can adversely affect the cell's function, including its ability to allow hormones, glucose, and other substances to flow in and out of the cell. Therefore, a diet high in refined polyunsaturated vegetable oils promotes diabetes. A diet low in such oils helps alleviate symptoms. Because all fats also promote weight gain, it's best to avoid them as much as possible." "There is one fat that diabetics can eat without fear. That fat is coconut oil. Not only does it not contribute to diabetes, but it helps regulate blood sugar, thus lessening the effects of the disease. The Nauru people consumed large amounts of coconut oil for generations without ever encountering diabetes, but when they abandoned it for other foods and oils the results were disastrous." "As mentioned earlier in this chapter, coconut oil puts less of a demand on the enzyme production of the pancreas. This lessens the stress on the pancreas during meal Continue reading >>

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut oil has been called a “superfood” with positive effects on heart and brain health, weight loss (especially abdominal fat) and a whole host and anti-inflammatory effects. But is coconut oil really a superfood? Or is it just the newest fad out there on the internet? Coconuts Coconuts have traditionally been the main staple food in many Asian and Pacific populations. In those same populations, coconut has also long been used as a medicine to treat infections, respiratory conditions, constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, kidney stones, and other disorders. Coconut meat (the whitish flakes) is high in fiber, protein, minerals such as manganese, selenium and iron and contains Vitamin C and B vitamins along with plant sterols. Coconut meat is also high in calories from fats—the fats are primarily the saturated fats along with high amounts of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut flour is the finely ground coconut meat. Coconut milk (pressed from coconut meat) is similar to coconut meat as far as its nutritional profile—it is high in fiber, protein, richer than coconut meat in minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium and contains Vitamins C, E and B vitamins. Coconut milk is also high in plant sterols and calories from fats. These fats are also in the saturated form with high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut water is diluted coconut milk and is much lower in calories. Finally, coconut oil is very high in calories from saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids with essentially no vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber—in other words, pure fat. The fats in coconut oil are in the form of medium-chain triacylglycerols, or MCT. Fats and Health For many years, fats in food were considered the main cause for fats on the body. Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes: All The Facts Uncovered

Coconut Oil And Diabetes: All The Facts Uncovered

If you were interviewing coconut oil for a job, you'd soon see it has quite an impressive resume, which is exactly why we're going to chat about coconut oil and diabetes. A quick internet scan will highlight the claims of coconut oil being good for everything from weight loss to curing diseases to skin and hair benefits, and even for fighting off infection. Are you keen to find out whether these claims are true and if it's a good food for diabetics? Let’s dive in and take a closer look at coconut oil to help us sort out the facts from the truth. What is coconut oil? Coconut oil is simply that, oil produced from the meat of mature coconuts. There are a few methods for extracting it. It can be cold pressed by rotary mills or extracted using heat and a solvent such as hexane, in which case it would then need to be refined (refined, bleached and deodorized). Cold pressed coconut oil has a slight ‘coconuty’ flavor while the refined option will not. Virgin coconut oil (there is no “extra virgin”) is produced using a single manual press without using heat or chemicals. Coconut oil is very unique in that it has a melting point of 76 F (24 C) making it more liquid at room temperature in warmer seasons, but generally it is a solid fat. Coconut oil can be hydrogenated to raise the melting point to 100 F (38 C) so it stays solid at room temperature. Coconut oil nutrition facts Coconut oil is purely fat. There are no carbohydrates or protein to speak of. It is 91% saturated fat, 6% mono and 3% polyunsaturated fat. While 91% fat sounds like a lot, much of the saturated fat is a very unique kind known as lauric acid, which is where the many health benefits are derived (we'll get into that in just a moment). Because coconut oil is solid fat, free of water content, it is highe Continue reading >>

Virgin Coconut Oil Helps Reduce Diabetes

Virgin Coconut Oil Helps Reduce Diabetes

A recent study from India published in the Journal of Food Science Technologyshowed positive results in improving glucose metabolism in high fructose diets in rats. Coconut oil is a common dietary oil in South India, so the researchers wanted to compare the common refined copra-based coconut oil found in the market place with the less-refined virgin coconut oil which has become more readily available in recent years. The results were very promising. The researchers found that glucose metabolism only increased 17% in a high-fructose diet as compared to 46% for those rates fed a standard coconut oil diet. The study abstract is found here . ( Virgin coconut oil maintains redox status and improves glycemic conditions in high fructose fed rats ) Curing Diabetes with Virgin Coconut Oil Testimonials Being the first one to import a virgin coconut oil from the Philippines to the United States back in 2001, we soon found out this truth about Virgin Coconut Oil helping with diabetes from our online user discussion groups over the years. Here are a few of them: Indeed Virgin Coconut Oil has a substantial effect on blood sugar levels. My wife and daughter (both have type 2 diabetes) measure their blood sugar levels at least three times a day. When they eat the wrong foods and their blood sugar levels get to 80-100 points above normal, they dont take extra medication, they take 2-3 tablespoons of the coconut oil directly from the bottle. Within a half hour their blood sugar levels will come back to normal.Ed,Coconut Diet Forums One day reading a newsletter, I ran across an article mentioning that Coconut Oil was used to regulate blood sugar levels. So on November 7, 2003, I ordered 2 quarts of the Virgin Coconut Oil. I began taking one tablespoon a day at dinner. My yearly blood tes Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: The fat phobia is very powerful. Most of us have been taught or told that fat is bad. So, for years, I avoided adding fat to my meals. But, after I did some research and discovered the health benefits of plant oils such as extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, I became more comfortable with adding fat to my meals. Gradually, I learned to accept that fat was good and that I needed to eat fat on purpose! :-) Extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it provides anti-inflammatory and glucose stabilization benefits, both of which are beneficial to people with Type 2 diabetes. In addition, extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it contains phytonutrients called polyphenols, which are well-known to have anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-inflammatory strength of olive oil rests on its polyphenols. These anti-inflammatory compounds contain several well-researched anti-inflammatory nutrients, including the following: Anthocyanidins (cyanidins, peonidins) Flavones (apigenin, luteolin) Flavonols (quercetin; kaempferol) Flavonoid glycosides (rutin) Lignans (pinoresinol) These anti-inflammatory nutrients help to decrease inflammation markers, such as homocysteine, C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-alpha, interleukin 1-beta, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4. This provides health benefits to people with systemic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Heart disease reduction has been identified in numerous studies of the Mediterranean Diet, which uses olive oil. This reduction in heart disease is due to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and an increase in the HDL:LDL ratio; and a decrease in blood pressure. Olive oil contains heart-healthy fat in the form of oleic acid, Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Diabetes is a very common condition in North America and Europe; about 30 million people in the United States have diabetes. Every cell in a persons body requires glucose or fatty acids to function properly; without it, cells can weaken and die. Cells cannot process glucose properly without the help of insulin. When someone has diabetes, their body does not produce enough insulin to help their cells process glucose properly or their body does not respond properly to the insulin it creates. People get the glucose that feeds their cells from the food that they eat, if the glucose is not processed by the cells properly, it stays in the bloodstream where it builds up and causes damage to the body. There are two common types of diabetes, type one and type two; about 90% of people with diabetes have type two diabetes. The most common reason for type two diabetes is excess weight, but it can also be caused by high blood pressure, high cholesterol, genetics, age, blood vessel disease and several other things. The most common symptoms of type two diabetes are excessive thirst, frequent urination, fatigue and blurred vision. Untreated diabetes can cause heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, high blood pressure, and serious lower body circulation problems that can lead to amputation. People with type one diabetes require a daily insulin shot to keep their diabetes under control. People with type two diabetes will take insulin or a prescription drug to help keep their diabetes under control, but in many cases a diet change and weight loss is recommended. One of the most natural and easiest ways to combat diabetes is with coconut oil. Coconut oil contains medium chain fatty acids that cells can process with or without insulin. The fatty acids in coconut oil help to nourish cell Continue reading >>

Coconut

Coconut

Tweet Coconut can be consumed in many different forms, and it can have a variety of benefits for people with diabetes. The coconut has great versatility, and it can form part of many people’s daily diets. It is highly nutritious and rich in fibre, vitamins and minerals, and it provides the majority of the food eaten on many islands worldwide. A coconut is actually a one-seeded drupe, not a nut, nor a fruit. Coconuts are generally regarded as having a number of advantageous for people with diabetes. Nutritional benefits of coconut Coconuts are high in naturally occurring saturated fat from short and medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) such as lauric acid. Lauric acid is converted in the body into monolaurin [163], a beneficial compound that destroys a wide variety of organisms that cause disease. It is used to fight common colds and viral infections, such as the flu. Coconuts also contain the following nutrients that can have benefits for the body: Vitamin C Thiamin (vitamin B1) Folate Potassium Manganese Copper Selenium Iron Phosphorous Potassium Coconut milk Coconut milk is derived from the flesh of the coconut. Coconut milk can come in two main forms: A thicker form, sometimes called coconut cream, that is commonly used in desserts or rich sauces A more fluid form, containing more added water, that can be used as a direct substitute for milk The more fluid form of coconut milk typically has no more calories than semi-skimmed milk. However, there are more calories in the thicker form of coconut milk, and caution may need to be exercised in regard to portion sizes. Furthermore, some forms of thicker coconut milk are heavily processed and include emulsifies, which might be bad for gut health and increase the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Coconut flour Coconut fl Continue reading >>

More in diabetes