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Diabetes Chia Seeds

8 Health Benefits Of Chi-chi-chia!: Blood Sugar, Belly Fat & More.

8 Health Benefits Of Chi-chi-chia!: Blood Sugar, Belly Fat & More.

Finally! I'm dedicating an entire post to this gluten-free, ancient grain that I use several times per week. Yes, this is the same chia as the "chia-pet" from the 80's. If you were a kid/teen of that ancient time, then you know what I'm talking about (wink). Chia will make any meal more joyous, in other words, "healthier". It's also one of those foods you barely notice, making it ideal to sneak into your child's food, AH-HA. Or better yet, educate them on why you've added it to their morning cereal or sprinkled it on their dinner (I like that idea even better). 1. Balances and stabilizes your blood sugar Chia slows the effect at which glucose enters the bloodstream, making it ideal for diabetics and those wanting to prevent diabetes. Do you have wild kids and find it hard to calm them down? Along with a balanced diet, managing blood sugar is CRITICAL to good behaviour, attention span and your child's mood. 2. Improves insulin sensitivity and lower insulin This means it will indirectly help with belly fat as fat in this area is associated with excess insulin (and cortisol). 3. FIBRE-RIFFIC! For all you "BranBud/ALLBRAN-lovers" out there, guess who's got more fibre than wheat bran that won't bloat your belly and is GLUTEN-FREE? You guessed it, chia. Bye-bye bran, hello chia. Bran cereals are highly refined, despite their brown colour and are missing many of the essential nutrients and all their good fat - thanks to manufacturing. GO CHIA. 4. Good fat and high omega-3 In fact, the highest omega 3 content in nature - AMAZING HUH? This makes me wanna sing chi-chi-chia everytime I eat it for this very reason. Chia seeds are one of the greatest plant sources of a fatty acid called alpha-linoleic acid (ALA). 5. Contains high amounts of tryptophan This amino acid is the precurso Continue reading >>

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

Nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters are a great source of protein and natural fats. This means that they make for a great 'GD food pairing tool' to eat with carbohydrates to slow down the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. But with so many different products available to buy, which ones should you choose and are any better than others? Here we share with you all our hints and tips for choosing the best nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters... Nuts Nuts are a great source of protein and natural fat but they do still contain carbohydrates, meaning that some nuts are better than others. The best choice for nuts are nuts which are not salted or flavoured. Looking at this chart we can see that cashew nuts and pistachio nuts contain the highest amounts of carbohydrates, making them the nuts which aren't so good for pairing if eaten in larger amounts. Another nut that is high in carbohydrates, which isn't listed on this chart is the chestnut, so be wary of these carby nuts at Christmas! Highest in protein are the peanut and almonds. With macademia, walnuts and pecans being the highest in fats. That makes these nuts better for food pairing. Flavoured or coated nuts Salted, dry roasted, sweet chilli, BBQ, salt & vinegar, yoghurt coated, crispy shells, chocolate coated, you name it they seem make nuts covered or coated in so many different things. Savoury nuts included salted, dry roasted and flavoured contain high amounts of salt, so bear this in mind when eating them. Choosing nuts which are yoghurt or chocolate coated means that you are significantly increasing the carb amount, making these type of nuts possibly suitable for a treat, but would not be advisable as such good 'food pairing tools'. What about snickers, peanut M&Ms & Reese's peanut butter cups? Continue reading >>

6 Science Backed Benefits Of Chia Seeds In Diabetes

6 Science Backed Benefits Of Chia Seeds In Diabetes

Diabetes is a health condition that includes Diabetes Insipidus(DI) and Diabetes Mellitus(DM). Diabetes insipidus is caused due to the kidney’s inability to respond to Anti Diuretic Hormone (ADH). ADH is a hormone secreted by the hypothalamus; it is responsible for regulating and balancing the amount of water in the blood. Diabetes mellitus can be further categorized as Type 1 and Type2. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by high blood glucose levels, insulin resistance and lack of production of insulin. Insulin is secreted by the β cells in the pancreas. Insulin regulates the glucose levels in the blood by sending out signals to liver, fat and muscle cells to take in the glucose thus reducing the blood glucose levels. A defect in this blood glucose regulation mechanism leads to Diabetes mellitus. The cause of Diabetes can be genetic or can be a result of an unhealthy lifestyle. Diabetes is a chronic disease. People diagnosed with Diabetes need to take care of their diet and health overall in order to not spike the levels of glucose in the blood. If the disease is not kept under check it may lead to further complications like cardiovascular defects, gangrene and retinopathy. The best way to avoid any further complications is to have good food and a healthy lifestyle. Chia seed is one such super food which helps manage diabetes. What are Chia Seeds? Salvia hispanica, the plant species whose seed is categorized under the umbrella of Super Foods, is native to the central and southern regions of Mexico and Gautemala. Chia as the plant is popularly known was a major commodity in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Historic and economic studies have made it evident that Salvia hispanica or Chia was as the staple food of that region and was given even more importance than maize. The Continue reading >>

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Last night, after dinner, after I checked my post-dinner blood sugar (I have to poke myself 4 times a day to do this), I cried. It was 147, & according to my guidelines, it needs to be under 140 post-meals. I miscalculated the carbohydrates in “refried” beans & had nearly a cup, rather than 2/3 cups I should have had, which is just a slight difference, but enough to put me over the edge. It’s an overwhelming feeling to feel like your health is in your control, yet at the same time you feel a little out of control. It’s also a depressing thought to think about having a long term health issue that affects every aspect of your life. Believe me, I realize gestational diabetes (which is temporary), is nothing like a lifelong type-1 diabetic, or some other much more all-encompassing long-term disease or health issue. But, it’s giving me a glimpse of that life, & I have a greater empathy, though still limited understanding, of what those individuals might be going through. Fortunately, as I mentioned in Tuesday’s post (which thank you, by the way, for so many great comments!), I’m feeling so much better since I’ve made some tweeks in my diet. Here are some truths I’ve always known about myself, some even from a young age: 1) Sugar, especially too much sugar, makes me wacky. I love sweet things, as you well know, but I absolutely have to keep my sugar consumption (even unrefined sugars) in check. 2) My body is sensitive to foods. And like the princess & the pea, I’m overly-aware of any & all feelings/discomforts/issues going on with my body. At times it’s annoying, but overall, I’m glad my body speaks to me, & I try to listen & act accordingly, as best I can. Here are some things I’ve realized recently: 1) The importance of exercise for controlling blo Continue reading >>

9 Incredible Health Benefits Of Chia Seeds

9 Incredible Health Benefits Of Chia Seeds

9 Incredible Health Benefits of Chia Seeds Chia is now popular in breakfast foods | siobhandolezal/Pixabay The Aztecs knew about the versatile chia seed and its energy-boosting properties centuries ago the name means strength in Mayan but only in recent years has this petite seed become a fashionable superfood, making appearances in kitchens and recipes around the world. In its country of origin, Mexico, the chia seed remains as common and cheap as ever before. Here are some of its incredible health benefits. There are really few better foods than chia seeds when it comes to getting an antioxidant boost goodness; these small black seeds are chock full of them. This is especially beneficial for your skin , as antioxidants have been proven to fight the production of free radicals that can damage skin cells and contribute to the ageing process. Chia seeds also contain essential minerals such as magnesium, copper, manganese, zinc, iron and niacin. Petite chia seeds pack a punch Health Gauge/Flickr Chia is great for digestion. Just a small 30-gram (1-ounce) serving of these seeds boasts 11 grams (0.4 ounces) of fibre, a whopping 30% of the recommended daily intake. Eating a fibre-rich diet can, alongside helping some chronic diseases, aid your bodys ability to regulate insulin correctly and promote a healthy bowel. Furthermore, this high fibre content actually helps offset the assumed high carb content of chia seeds, meaning they can be great for low-carb diets. Fibre tends to absorb water the second it hits the stomach, and can therefore leave you feeling fuller for longer. The extremely high fibre content of chia seeds can help to curb hunger pangs for longer and you may lose weight as a result. Combine this with the presence of tryptophan (an amino acid) and you could al Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds Promote Weight Loss, Improved Body Composition In Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity

Chia Seeds Promote Weight Loss, Improved Body Composition In Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity

Chia seeds promote weight loss, improved body composition in type 2 diabetes, obesity Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are posted on this topic. Receive an email when new articles are posted on this topic. Adults with type 2 diabetes and overweight or obesity saw greater improvements in body weight, waist circumference and C-reactive protein levels when assigned to a diet that included chia seeds vs. those assigned to a diet with oat bran for 6 months, according to findings from a randomized controlled trial. Vladimir Vuksan, PhD, of the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center at St. Michaels Hospital in Toronto, and colleagues analyzed data from 58 patients with type 2 diabetes and overweight or obesity . Researchers randomly assigned participants to a 6-month calorie-restricted diet along with either 30 g/1,000 kcal per day of chia seeds (n = 27) or to 36 g/1,000 kcal per day of oat bran as a control (n = 31). Both supplements were provided in two forms, with one-third baked into whole wheat bread and the remainder provided as a powder to be sprinkled onto food to reduce monotony. Participants attended the clinic at 2 weeks and then every 6 weeks for 6 months to receive one-on-one 30-minute counseling sessions with a study dietitian; 3-day food records were completed at each visit. Primary endpoint was change in body weight at 10 months; secondary endpoints included changes in waist circumference, body composition, glycemic control, C-reactive protein and satiety hormones. Patients assigned to chia seeds saw a greater reduction in body weight at 6 months vs. controls (1.9 kg vs. 0.3 kg; P = .02), as well as a greater reduction in waist circumference (3.5 cm vs. 1.1 cm; P = .027) and C-reactive protein (1.1 mg/L vs Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds And Diabetes

Chia Seeds And Diabetes

Chia seeds are one of those foods that's been proclaimed to be a ‘superfood'. And the topic of chia seeds and diabetes seems to come up frequently with questions such as: Can people with diabetes eat chia seeds? Are there any benefits of chia seeds for diabetes? Is chia harmful for diabetes? Is chia good for diabetics? These are all similar questions so in this post we're going to explore the ins and outs of chia. What Is Chia? According to Wikipedia: “Salvia hispanica, commonly known as chia, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala”. It's an ancient seed that dates back to the 16th Century and is thought to be used by the Aztecs. The seeds themselves are harvested from the flowers and can be used for multiple purposes, which we'll cover in more detail soon. Chia Seed Nutrition As can be seen by this nutrition table, chia seeds are full of fiber, healthy fats such as omega 3, protein, and loads of vitamins and minerals. In fact, as far as seeds go, they really are a ‘complete' food source so we can see why it's been eaten for centuries. Please pin, share, or tweet this post Please pin, share, or tweet this post Data calculated from USDA Nutrient Database Can People With Diabetes Eat Chia Seeds? The short and small answer to this question is YES. Chia is a healthy food for diabetics to eat. Are There Any Benefits Of Chia For Diabetes? As a matter of fact there are quite a number of benefits. Improves glucose and insulin tolerance In a recent study in rats, one group of rats were fed a high fat, high fructose (sugar) diet (HFF), and the other group were fed a high fat, high fructose (sugar) diet along with chia seeds and chia oil (HFFC). The rats fed the HFF diet developed glucose intoleran Continue reading >>

Bad Numbers & Chia Seeds

Bad Numbers & Chia Seeds

A few weeks ago, I returned from my doctor, where he exclaimed, "What happened? Your sugars are through the roof!" I was stunned, but I don't know why I should have been. Since Thanksgiving, I haven't been eating healthy and, soon after Christmas, I took a 3-week vacation and ate my way from Florida to Maine! I had gained 8 pounds. I looked my doctor in the eye and told the truth. I didn't make excuses, admitted I'd been off my food plan for several months and hadn't been testing regularly, so I had no clue what my BG trends had been. He gave me three months to get my A1C below 7 again, or he highly recommends that I go back on insulin. I was devastated. I went home, felt sorry for myself for having this horrible disease for the 100th+ time and, yes, I cried. Then I made a confession to myself: Perfectionist though I am, I am only human and, just like everyone else that struggles with diabetes, I make mistakes. It took me a few days, but I have forgiven myself, I've begun to eat healthy consistently and have even begun to regain some enthusiasm for vegetables again. My progress is slow, but I'm on track with my food plan again and some weight has been lost. I hope my BG numbers will begin to go down but, so far, they remain high. Now, what are Chia Seeds? They are the tiny, edible "Chia Pet" seeds that are incredibly high in fiber, low in carbs, a good source of Omega 3 fatty acids, high in calcium and protein and help me to feel full longer and may aid in my weight loss! I learned about them from a program I watched on Netflix called, "Hungry for Change." (BTW, if you can watch this highly motivational documentary yourself, please do! Try Netflix or check out the DVD from your local library.) Since learning about this product, I purchased some Chia Seeds from Whole Foo Continue reading >>

A Three-minute Diabetes Breakfast That Changes Lives?

A Three-minute Diabetes Breakfast That Changes Lives?

A video preview of chia seed pudding from the Food Chapter of Bright Spots & Landmines! Mark your calendar for May 9, when Bright Spots & Landmines: The Diabetes Guide I Wish Someone Had Handed Me will launch at diaTribe.org/brightspots! The video on chia seed pudding below summarizes just one of the 43 Bright Spots discussed in the book. For those who prefer reading, the written details on how to make chia pudding are below the video. I’ve now made this recipe about 200 times, and after sharing some of the advantages last fall – little impact on blood glucose, very filling and tasty, three minutes to make without cooking, inexpensive, and stocked with Omega 3s and fiber – I’ve been shocked at the positive response. Said one diaTribe reader, “Adam, thank you so much. I’ve been looking for a breakfast like this for 25 years! It has changed my life.” How to Make Chia Seed Pudding To make chia seed pudding, I mix 1/4 cup of chia seeds, 1/2 cup of water, a hearty amount of cinnamon, 1-2 tbsp of coconut oil, and some combination of toppings like frozen raspberries, shelled sunflower seeds, and nuts. After about a minute of stirring with a spoon and about a minute sitting, it turns into a pudding-like gel. It can also be made in a batch ahead of time by quadrupling the recipe. The water can be hot or cold, depending on your preferences, and the pudding can be made thicker by using less water. Chocolate or vanilla protein powder or pure vanilla extract can be added for additional flavor. Parents have even emailed me with enthusiasm for this recipe – “My son loves this!” – meaning this isn’t just a weird concoction for health nuts like me. There is nothing “exact” about this recipe, so you can experiment with the components and toppings to fit your t Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds Promote Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Chia Seeds Promote Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

A new randomised controlled trial has found that supplementing with chia seeds may aid weight loss and lower inflammation in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes. Researchers in Canada compared the weight loss effects of two different calorie-restricted diets: one including 30 g of chia seeds per day and another supplemented daily with 36 g of oat bran, which served as the control group. They assigned 58 participants to either one of the diets and had them consult with a dietitian at two weeks and then every six weeks for six months, as well as keep food records to ensure compliance. After six months, participants in the chia seed group exhibited greater improvements in the levels of an inflammatory marker called C-reactive protein, body weight, and waist circumference. Participants assigned to chia seeds lost 1.9 kg on average, albeit a modest amount of weight, but those on oat bran only saw a reduction in body weight of 0.3 kg. The change in waist circumference was slightly more significant, with a reduction of 3.5 cm around the middle for people receiving chia seeds, compared to 1.1 cm in the control group. In terms of results for C-reactive protein, chia seed supplementation resulted in a decrease in levels by 1.1 mg/l, which is a notable but smaller reduction than what was previously found. Previous RCTs also suggested that chia seeds showed effectiveness in reducing HbA1c, however, no differences in glucose control measures were reported in this new study. Chia may provide weight loss benefits by increasing levels of adiponectin, a protein involved in the breakdown of fat. Participants taking chia had a 6.5 per cent increase in adiponectin levels. The beneficial effects of chia seeds could also come directly from their high α-linolenic acid (ALA) content. ALA Continue reading >>

A Chia Pet For Diabetes?

A Chia Pet For Diabetes?

Like swallows returning to San Juan Capistrano in the spring, Chia Pets begin appearing every December on late-night television and in the gift aisles of many stores. (Full disclaimer: I bought one for the Yankee Swap at Harvard Health Publication’s annual Christmas party.) Water these ceramic figures and they sprout a green “fur” from seeds embedded on the surface. Silly? Sure, that’s why they are such a hit. What you might not know is that the seeds may someday be a real gift for people with diabetes. Chia seeds come from a plant formally known as Salvia hispanica, which is a member of the mint family. It gets its common name from the Aztec word “chian,” meaning oily, because the herb’s small, black seeds are rich in oils. It was a staple food for the Aztecs, and legend has it that their runners relied on chia seeds for fuel as they carried messages one hundred or more miles in a day. Chia seeds contain more healthy omega-3 fats and fiber than flax or other grain seeds. They are also a good source of protein and antioxidants. Some preliminary research indicates that chia seeds could—I stress the “could”—help people with diabetes control their blood sugar and protect their hearts. Studies in animals show that a chia-rich diet lowers harmful LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while increasing beneficial HDL cholesterol. And a white-seeded variant of chia, called Salba, helped diabetic volunteers control their blood sugar, as well as their blood pressure and new markers of cardiac risk, such as C-reactive protein. The results were published in the journal Diabetes Care. Before you rush out to buy Salba, which is sold online and in health food stores, keep in mind that it worked only slightly better than wheat bran (which is less expensive and easier Continue reading >>

Medication And Chia Seeds And Flax Seeds

Medication And Chia Seeds And Flax Seeds

So I read on metamucil fiber to take medications 2 hours before or 2 hours after taking Metamucil powder. Everyone says fiber slows down digestion. So do I have to wait 2 hours before and/or after eating and/or drinking chia or flaxseed meal or seeds food. I take metformin with meal and would like to know if I can take it with chia or flaxseed. But I want to know this for any medication. Metamucil is psyllium husk expensively packaged. It doesn't contain any of the seeds you mention. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) I know but I was generally using metamucil as a example. Can you take medications with these types of food or foods with high fiber? I've never seen any recommendations to avoid taking medications with high fibre foods. I've never taken many medications, but those I've taken that say to take with or immediately after a meal have never said anything about avoiding taking them with fibre. You're on metformin, I gather. What does the package insert for your metformin say about dosage and food? The medication does not say except take with food. I read the part in metamucil and thought will this apply to other fiber foods like chia or flax. Just my thinking. I have never eatin those but recently started chia seeds and thought can I have it with metformin or any other medications. Or do I have to wait like with Metamucil. Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. My endo once recommended Metamucil but never said anything about taking it with or without Metformin. He even gave me samples but I never did take it. I have eaten chia seeds, flax and other seeds but never even thought about your question, Vickn. So I dont know, sorry. Good question tho. Given the tone of medication inserts and manufacturers' fear of litigation, I would say tha Continue reading >>

9 Chia Seeds Benefits + Side Effects

9 Chia Seeds Benefits + Side Effects

Chia seeds (salvia hispanica) have become one of the most popular superfoods in the health community. They’re easy to digest when prepared properly and a very versatile ingredient that adds easily to recipes. Plus, chia seeds benefits are plentiful. Chia seeds are the best-kept secret of the nutrition industry! Download our simple guide to learn how they can improve your health and wellness routine. Originally grown in Mexico, the seeds were highly valued for their medicinal properties and nutritional value. In fact, they were even used as currency. The chia seed is nutrient-dense and packs a punch of energy-boosting power. Aztec warriors ate chia seeds to give them high energy and endurance. They said just one spoonful of chia could sustain them for 24 hours. Chia means “strength” in the Mayan language, and chia seeds were known as “runners’ food” because runners and warriors would use them as fuel while running long distances or during battle. Not only that, but recent research has found that the chia seeds benefits are even greater than we realized. Chia seeds benefits include promoting healthy skin, reducing signs of aging, supporting the heart and digestive system, building stronger bones and muscles, and more. They’ve even been linked to helping reverse diabetes. Continue reading for possible side effects, preparation instructions and a complete list of chia seeds benefits and nutrients. Chia Seed Nutrition Profile The reason chia seeds are so beneficial is due to them being rich in fiber, omega-3 fats, protein, vitamins and minerals. For example, one ounce (28 grams) of chia seeds contain about: (1) 137 calories 12.3 grams carbohydrates 4.4 grams protein 8.6 grams fat 10.6 grams fiber 0.6 milligram manganese (30 percent DV) 265 milligrams phosphorus Continue reading >>

Flax Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Chia Seed & Diabetes

Flax Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Chia Seed & Diabetes

Seeds and nuts are often referred to as the ultimate “super foods” because they contain nutrients, protein and “good” fat. Seeds are also antioxidant-rich and satisfy your appetite. People with diabetes should add seeds in small amounts to their daily diet because they are delicious, nutritious and conveniently portable. Seeds are an easy way to add protein, fat and nutrients to your diet. They are a leading source of energy to keep you going all day without the highs and lows people get from sugary snacks. Seeds are also portable so you can carry them as a quick snack on-the-go. Flavorful flax seeds help combat high cholesterol and coronary artery disease, two common concerns for people with diabetes. They can be used to reduce inflammation and minimize the symptoms of many gastrointestinal conditions. There is evidence that adding flax seeds can help people shed pounds and improve a kidney infection. These seeds may also protect against cancer and arthritis because of the way the body breaks them down. Flaxseed oil is used externally for inflammation, eczema and boils. Flax seeds are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber and protein. Flaxseed meal is easier to digest and absorb than the seeds themselves. Use flaxseed meal in breads and muffins for a nutty taste. Flax seeds can be ground in a coffee grinder to make fresh meal, which should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Grinding it as you need it keeps the oils more fresh and potent. Sprinkle flaxseed meal over any finished dish for a slightly nutty flavor and use it to thicken stew or soup or sprinkle on a salad. Pumpkin seeds have heart-healthy fat along with plenty of vitamins and minerals such as vitamin K and zinc. They also make you feel fuller longer so they are a great sna Continue reading >>

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