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Diabetes Check Ups

Simple Tests Fill Health-check Gaps

Simple Tests Fill Health-check Gaps

Although health checkups are often mandatory for corporate or institutional employees, some segments of society, including housewives and the self-employed, may not have this option. In a country where cancer is rife but screening rates are hovering between 20 and 30 percent, according to the National Cancer Center, its still considered bothersome to book a half-day checkup at a hospital. To make life easier, a wide range of simplified health examination kits designed to detect diseases including diabetes, cancer and even HIV/AIDS, are cropping up. It is hoped the simplified exams will boost screening rates and thus early detection and more timely recuperation. Following are questions and answers about the tests: How do the simplified checkups differ from the ones offered at companies and health care centers? They come in several forms, including postal kits that allow people to do the test at home and mail the data and materials out for analysis, and those that can be performed at your local pharmacy. Pharmacies are offering individual kits that can check your blood for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), an effective way to test for diabetes. The tests are either free or cheaper than those offered by hospitals, and cost less than 10,000. No health insurance card is needed. Other kits can be used to do blood tests at home, as long as you are willing to prick your own fingertip. They also come with containers for urine or feces samples. Where can I get a simple HbA1c test done? There are 10 pharmacies in Adachi Ward, Tokyo, offering the test as part of a joint project involving Tsukuba University, the nonprofit Adachi Diabetes Mellitus Society and the Adachi Ward Pharmacist Association. Ten more are offering it in Tokushima as a project between Tsukuba University and Tokushim Continue reading >>

Dental Checkups Can Help Determine Early Detection Of Diabetes

Dental Checkups Can Help Determine Early Detection Of Diabetes

Dental Checkups Can Help Determine Early Detection of Diabetes Most people go for a dental checkup for the simple reason of getting their overall oral health examined and perhaps a professional cleaning. But, did you know that by getting a dental checkup, the dentist can also tell you if you are at risk for diabetes? A recent study by Columbia University College of Dental Medicine found that a pre-diabetes determination can be made by simply going to the dentist. Columbias study looked at approximately 530 adults with at least one diabetes risk factor (family history of diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension or obesity). Each patient received a periodontal examination and a fingerstick hemoglobin A1c test. Patients later returned for a fasting plasma glucose test to show whether they have diabetes or are pre-diabetic. Researchers found that a basic algorithm of only two dental parameters (the number of missing teeth and percentage of deep periodontal pockets) was helpful in identifying patients with unrecognized pre-diabetes. The addition of the hemoglobin A1c test further improved the algorithms performance. This study suggests that symptoms of periodontal disease can be an early detection of diabetes. With routine dental examinations, you can greatly improve your chances of identifying early onset diabetes. Call Sage Dental toll-free at 877-764-0423Like us on Facebook at Follow us on Twitter at Have a question? We always want to answer your inquiries. We encourage our new patients to arrive 15 minutes earlier than their scheduled appointment time. Click here for forms Find a local dentist and request an appointment today! At Sage Dental, our caring and friendly team of dentists, specialists, hygienists, and staff work together to provide you with a Total Care Solut Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment

2020 About, Inc. (Dotdash) All rights reserved Barbie Cervoni MS, RD, CDCES, CDN, is a registered dietitian andcertified diabetes care and education specialist. Richard N. Fogoros, MDon September 20, 2017 Richard N. Fogoros, MD, is a retired professor of medicine and board-certified internal medicine physician and cardiologist. He is Verywell's Senior Medical Advisor. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body is unable to adequately control the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood , which can lead to dangerously high blood glucose ( hyperglycemia ). The symptoms of type 2 diabetes range from increased thirst, frequent urination, extreme fatigue, and slow healing of wounds. As the disease progresses, more serious complications can develop, including skin disorders, sexual dysfunction , kidney disease, nerve damage, and vision loss. Type 2 diabetes develops when the pancreas begins to produce less insulin (a hormone that controls blood sugar levels) or when the body becomes less sensitive to the effects of insulinknown as insulin resistance . A simple blood test can diagnose type 2 diabetes. Once it's been verified, treatment depends on factors such as age, weight, blood sugar level, and how advanced the disease. For some people, this might mean relying solely on lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, dietary changes, and exercise. For others, managing type 2 diabetes may require supplemental insulin and/or diabetes medications as well. In the earliest stages of type 2 diabetes, most people do not experience obvious symptoms. It isn't until blood sugar levels become very high that symptoms begin to appear. Left untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious and even debilitating or life-threatening complications. The most common symptoms of type 2 di Continue reading >>

Annual Diabetes Checkup

Annual Diabetes Checkup

Annual diabetes checkup It is important for all people with diabetes to get an annual check up with your doctor or specialist (your doctor or specialist may recommend you have more regular check ups). Some of the things that may be checked at your check up along with goal levels are below. It’s important to note that all targets should be individualized as appropriate for each person, but in general the following targets are recommended: Date Weight Blood Pressure (goal ≤ 130/80) HBA1c (goal ≤ 55 mmol/mol) Total Cholesterol (goal ≤ 4) HDL Cholesterol (goal ≥ 1) LDL Cholesterol (goal < 2 ) Triglycerides (goal < 1.7 ) Microalbuminuria (ratio < 3 ) Date of last eye examination (at least every 2 years) Foot check, sensation and pulses Understanding type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. For many people (but not all) it can be prevented through following a healthy lifestyle. While type 2 diabetes cannot be cured, it can be managed and people with type 2 diabetes can and do live active and healthy lives. Diabetes is the result of the body not creating enough insulin to keep blood glucose (sugar) levels in the normal range. Everyone needs some glucose in their blood, but if it’s too high it can damage your body over time. In type 2 diabetes, either the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the cells in the body don’t recognise the insulin that is present. The end result is the same: high levels of glucose in your blood. For many people (but not all) type 2 diabetes can be prevented by making healthy food choices and staying active. There is a clear link between type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension) and / or disordered levels of fats (cholesterol) in the blood (the medical name for this is dyslipidaemia). This com Continue reading >>

Summary Of Guidelines For Patients With Diabetes: Checklist For Your Doctor Visits

Summary Of Guidelines For Patients With Diabetes: Checklist For Your Doctor Visits

Every person with diabetes should visit a doctor at least every three months. Regular checkups allow your doctor to track your condition and, if necessary, make changes in your treatment plan. But what should happen during those checkups? Do you wonder why your doctor orders certain tests? Or what the numbers mean? The American Diabetes Associations guidelines cover all aspects of diabetes care, including doctors' visits. This summary of the ADA's recommendations will help you know what to expect from your next visit. If you still wonder why your doctor has ordered a test -- or not ordered a test -- be sure to ask the doctor directly. When tests should be done The ADA has different guidelines for what should happen on diagnosis, at each visit, every three months, and once a year. 1. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor should provide a pneumococcal vaccine for protection against pneumonia, unless you have already been vaccinated. This vaccination does not have to be renewed each year. When you turn 65, however, you should receive another vaccine if you haven't had one in the last five years. 2. At each visit, a doctor should do the following: Ask about your self-monitoring of blood sugar. Ask about frequency and severity of episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Check your weight. Measure your blood pressure. Carefully inspect your legs and feet (including between the toes) for sores. Ask about your medication use. Answer questions about the disease and educate you about self-care. Check on any diabetic complications, including symptoms of nerve damage such as numbness. Ask about your use of tobacco and/or alcohol. Ask you about any lifestyle changes and discuss the consequences. Talk to you about possible stress, de Continue reading >>

Diabetes Screening & Counseling

Diabetes Screening & Counseling

What is diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It is a health condition that affects how the body uses glucose, the main type of sugar in the blood. The glucose level in the blood rises after eating a meal and causes the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the blood stream. For patients with diabetes, the body either can't make or respond to insulin properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood instead of going into cells as it should. As a result, blood sugar levels in the blood are higher than normal and can lead to damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. While the exact cause of diabetes is not known, obesity and lack of physical activity are two of the most common risk factors for the disease. People with type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms for many years. Early symptoms of diabetes may include blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, pain or numbness in the feet or hands, infections that are more frequent or heal slowly, fatigue, hunger, increased thirst and urination. Blood tests are needed to confirm the diagnosis. What is diabetes screening & counseling? Diabetes screening & counseling is a service designed to measure a patient's risk for diabetes. For most accurate results, it is recommended that you fast for 9-12 hours before testing. During this visit, we will record the patient's age, height, weight and waist circumference, as well as medical, family, and social history information. After this, a blood test will be performed by obtaining a small blood sample from the patient's finger to measure blood sugar levels. Based on the results of these screenings we will counsel the patient on their risk factors and recommend lifestyle changes to help the patient lead a healt Continue reading >>

Post Birth Diabetes Testing

Post Birth Diabetes Testing

Gestational diabetes increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy. Statistics from Diabetes UK state that there is a seven-fold increased risk in women with gestational diabetes developing type 2 diabetes in later life. NICE state that up to 50% of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years of the birth. A 2002 publication from Diabetes Care comparing 28 studies found that elevated fasting levels during pregnancy was the most common risk factor associated with future risk of type 2 diabetes: Cumulative incidence of type 2 diabetes increased markedly in the first 5 years after delivery and appeared to plateau after 10 years. An elevated fasting glucose level during pregnancy was the risk factor most commonly associated with future risk of type 2 diabetes. It is recommended that you should have a fasting glucose blood test at 6 weeks post-partum OR a HbA1c blood test after 13 weeks post-partum to check that you are clear of diabetes. It is no longer recommended that a repeat GTT is performed to check that the diabetes is clear (NICE guidelines Feb 2015). However it may still be offered in Scotland and Ireland or in hospitals which are not following the NICE recommendations. Many ladies have concerns over taking a fasting glucose test whilst breast feeding, or attending for blood tests whilst their newborn is still very young. If you have these concerns then you may want to opt for a HbA1c blood test after 13 weeks post-partum. You do not need to fast and it is one simple blood test that can be taken at your local GP surgery. High levels after giving birth You should eat a normal diet following the birth of your baby. Some hospitals will advise to continue testing blood sugar levels after giving birth. Be prepa Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes Tip Get Regular Health Check-ups

Prevent Diabetes Tip Get Regular Health Check-ups

/ Prevent Diabetes Tip get regular health check-ups Prevent Diabetes Tip get regular health check-ups Diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) can be prevented by means of regular health check-ups. Check out what are these tests. Bhavyajyoti Chilukoti | Updated: February 8, 2015 5:22 pm Tags: Prevent diabetes tip Prevention of diabetes Around 63 million individuals in India suffer from diabetes and this figure is expected to increase in the near future. Type2 diabetes , the common type of diabetes, is regarded as a lifestyle disorder, mainly caused due to unhealthy eating habits, sedentary lifestyle and a lack of proper awareness. There are various measures that can help in the prevention of diabetes and one such precautionary tip is to get regular health check-ups . The risk of various health complications like high blood pressure and heart diseases that are associated with diabetes increase as one gets older. Hence it is recommended that people who fall into high risk groups (such as obese individuals, are above 45 years of age and pregnant women) and those with a clinical history should go for regular check-ups so as to keep a track on your blood sugar levels. Here are few check-ups and lab tests that are a must for people who are at high risk of diabetes Continue reading >>

Making Diabetes Checkups More Fruitful

Making Diabetes Checkups More Fruitful

Pre-planning can turn scattered encounters into efficient, productive visits. This content conforms to AAFP CME criteria. See FPM CME Quiz. High-quality diabetes care is hardly a lone endeavor. Instead, it is a combination of forces: a physician and staff who are knowledgeable about the disease and current treatment guidelines, a patient who is involved and empowered to improve his or her own health, and a practice whose systems are designed in such a way that they help, not hinder, the care process. This third element, practice systems, may well be the richest area of improvement for most medical practices. One case in point is Family Care Network, a northwest Washington group without walls, which recently embarked on an ambitious 13-month diabetes quality improvement project. Very quickly, the group realized that its patient encounters, crucial to the delivery of high-quality diabetes care, were not living up to their full potential. As in many practices, patients arrived for their visits without having had the necessary lab work or other services performed in advance. As a result, the physicians did not have complete information to guide the visit, while patients gave very little thought to what they would like to accomplish regarding their disease. Post-visit, practices were left with tremendous follow-up work that included making phone calls to obtain or communicate the elusive test results. In short, visits were unplanned and participants were largely unprepared. The solution to this problem for Family Care Network's three pilot sites was to implement a fairly simple system called pre-planning. Pre-planning involves creating systems within a practice to ensure that the staff, physician and patient are all prepared for the visit. Instead of the patient showing up Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Screening

Diabetic Eye Screening

Diabetic eye screening is a key part of diabetes care. People with diabetes are at risk of damage from diabetic retinopathy, a condition that can lead to sight loss if it's not treated. Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common causes of sight loss among people of working age. It occurs when diabetes affects small blood vessels, damaging the part of the eye called the retina. When the blood vessels in the central area of the retina (the macula) are affected, it's known as diabetic maculopathy. People with diabetes should also see their optician every two years for a regular eye test. Diabetic eye screening is specifically for diabetic retinopathy and can't be relied upon for other conditions. Why eye screening is needed Screening is a way of detecting the condition early before you notice any changes to your vision. Diabetic retinopathy doesn't usually cause any noticeable symptoms in the early stages. If retinopathy is detected early enough, treatment can stop it getting worse. Otherwise, by the time symptoms become noticeable, it can be much more difficult to treat. This is why the NHS Diabetic Eye Screening Programme was introduced. Everyone aged 12 and over with diabetes is offered screening once a year. Diabetic retinopathy is extremely unusual in children with diabetes who are under the age of 12. The check takes about half an hour and involves examining the back of the eyes and taking photographs of the retina. When diabetic eye screening is offered Everyone with diabetes who is 12 years of age or over should be invited to have their eyes screened once a year. You should receive a letter from your local Diabetic Eye Screening Service inviting you to attend a screening appointment. The letter will include a leaflet about diabetic eye screening. People with di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 10 Tests And Exams To Keep You Healthy

Diabetes: 10 Tests And Exams To Keep You Healthy

If you have diabetes, taking care of yourself at home and getting regular checkups are key to staying healthy. During office visits, your doctor will do tests to try to find any problems so they can be treated before they become bigger issues. If you find them early enough, most can be managed with diet, exercise, or medication. This blood test tells you and your doctor how your blood sugar has been over the past 2 to 3 months. While you probably test it every day, that only shows what your levels are at that point in time. The result is given as a percentage the higher the percentage, the higher your blood sugar levels have been. The goal is for your A1C level to be less than 7%. The American Diabetes Association recommends you have this test at least twice a year. You should check your blood pressure regularly at home. But your doctor also will check it each time you visit the office. You can have high blood pressure without knowing it. Generally, your first number (systolic) should be less than 120. Your second number (diastolic) should be under 80. If you have high blood pressure and it's not managed well, for instance with lifestyle changes or medication, you're more likely to have heart disease or a stroke. These types of fat can collect in your arteries and lead to heart problems and stroke. Your doctor will want to check three things with a blood test at least once a year: HDL ("good") cholesterol, LDL ("bad") cholesterol, and triglycerides. You'll want your LDL level to be less than 100 and your triglyceride level to be under 150. On the flip side, a man's HDL should be higher than 40, and a woman's should be over 50. High blood sugar levels can lead to higher levels of cholesterol. Talk with your doctor about where your numbers are and where they should be. T Continue reading >>

Essential Annual Diabetes Checks

Essential Annual Diabetes Checks

Once diagnosed with diabetes , the NHS should invite a person for regular check-ups, including an annual diabetes check. Regular check-ups can catch early signs of complications. If you have diabetes then getting key diabetes tests, such as the HbA1c test , a dilated eye examination, and a foot examination, is essential. NHS and Diabetes UK research has found too few people with diabetes are having the health checks and services recommended by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Here are the tests and services Diabetes UK says diabetes patients should have: There are a number of tests the charity says people with diabetes should be having. You should: Have your blood glucose levels measured at least once a year with an HbA1c blood test. Have your blood pressure measured and recorded at least once a year. Have your cholesterol measured every year. Have your eyes screened for signs of retinopathy every year. Using a specialised digital camera, a photo of each eye should be taken and examined by a specialist who will look for any changes to your retina (the seeing part at the back of your eye). Have the skin , circulation and nerve supply of your legs and feet examined annually. Have your kidney functions monitored annually. You should have two tests for your kidneys : a urine test for protein (a sign of possible kidney problems) and a blood test to measure kidney function. Have your weight checked and have your waist measured to see if you need to lose weight . Children should have more frequent HbA1c measurements and generally do not have formal screening for complications (eg blood pressure , blood fats, eyes , feet and kidneys) until they are 12 years old. However, their weight, height and general health should be regularly monitored. In addit Continue reading >>

Annual Tests For Diabetics: Make Sure Your List Is Complete

Annual Tests For Diabetics: Make Sure Your List Is Complete

Annual tests for diabetics: make sure your list is complete The routine tests for diabetics what all should they assess? First and foremost: the level of blood sugar control is the most important group of tests. Tests which detect the common complications of diabetes such as diabetic kidney disease are also important Diabetics have a high risk of CVD or heart disease leading to heart attack or stroke, so tests assessing these risks are important. But you also need clinical tests and assessments by your doctor, which are commonly missed . For example foot examination, fundoscopy etc. In addition, diabetics need all the age and gender specific tests for cancer screening and common nutritional deficiencies. But most Diabetic health check up packages end up ignoring them Complete list of health assessment tests needed for diabetics Blood tests and urine tests for diabetics Blood sugar (Fasting and PP for the largest meal of the day) CBE: Complete Blood Examination (especially haemoglobin and haematocrit) Serum electrolytes and uric acid (if you also have high BP) Eye check up for diabetic retinopathy including fundoscopy Screening for diabetic neuropathy (foot examination): need to see your doctor Screening for OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnoea) If you are obese and snore loudly on most night, or your spouse has noticed that you stop breathing for a few seconds in sleep, discuss with your doctor Women aged >20 years or more, should do BSE (Breast Self Examination), once every month (after your menses), check out the links Breast examination by a doctor and Mammography : check out the guidelines for cancer screening in Indians Sexually active women >21 years of age should get a Pap smear done, for more information : check out: cancer screening for Indians All people who consume Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Managing diabetes is one part investigation and two parts action. Unlike some other diseases that rely primarily on professional medical treatment, diabetes treatment requires active participation by the person who has it. Monitoring your blood sugar level on a regular basis and analyzing the results is believed by many to be a crucial part of the treatment equation. When someone is first diagnosed with diabetes, he is usually given a blood sugar meter (or told to go buy one) and told how and when to use it, as well as what numbers to shoot for. However, the advice a person receives on when to monitor and what the results should be generally depend on his type of diabetes, age, and state of overall health. It can also depend on a health-care provider’s philosophy of care and which set of diabetes care guidelines he follows. At least three major health organizations have published slightly different recommendations regarding goals for blood sugar levels. There is some common ground when it comes to blood sugar monitoring practices. For example, most people take a fasting reading before breakfast every morning. Some people also monitor before lunch, dinner, and bedtime; some monitor after each meal; and some monitor both before and after all meals. However, when monitoring after meals, some people do it two hours after the first bite of the meal, while others prefer to check one hour after the start of a meal. To help sort out the whys and when of monitoring, three diabetes experts weigh in with their opinions. While they don’t agree on all the details, they do agree on one thing: Regular monitoring is critical in diabetes care. Why monitor? Self-monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management because it puts you in charge. Regardless of how you manage your diab Continue reading >>

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