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Diabetes Check Up At Home

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Level With Diabetes

Being able to test blood glucose levels between routine doctor's or clinic visits is often an important part of managing diabetes. For type 1 diabetes, getting a blood glucose reading is important for working out an insulin dose, for example. For type 2 diabetes, getting a glucose reading is important, for example, in tracking how well managed the condition is and helping to prevent high and low blood sugar levels. Regular testing of your blood sugar can also help reduce the risk of long-term complications from diabetes. Ways to test your blood sugar levels with diabetes Traditional home blood glucose monitoring. The traditional method of testing your blood sugar is to prick your finger with a lancet - a very short, fine needle. You then put a drop of blood on a test strip and place the strip into a special measuring device known as a glucose meter. This then displays your blood sugar level. These meters vary in size, speed and cost. Many provide results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. They can also calculate an average blood glucose level over a period of time. Some also feature software kits that retrieve information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Meters and test strips are available at your local pharmacy. Devices that test other parts of your body. Newer devices allow you to test in areas other than your fingertips, such as your upper arm, forearm, thigh, and the base of your thumb. However, this may result in different blood glucose levels from those obtained from your fingertips. Blood glucose levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other parts of the body. This is especially true when your blood glucose is rapidly changing, such as after a meal or after exerci Continue reading >>

Diabetes Check Up Test: Home Testing

Diabetes Check Up Test: Home Testing

Hello Doktor > Diabetes Health Center > Diabetes Check up Test: Home Testing By Hoang Bui Medically reviewed by Dr. Duyen Le . Click to share on BBM (Opens in new window) If you have diabetes, self-testing at home can be an important part of your diabetes care plan. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic glucose meter that measures sugar level with a small drop of your blood. Testing your own levels also helps to prevent long-term complications of diabetes. Going to a hospital to measure blood sugar readings may take a lot of time, from making an appointment, traveling to the hospital, waiting to see a doctor. Instead, there are many types of meters which can help you monitor and control your diabetes at home, such as blood test, urine test or an A1C test. Blood glucose meter is the most common devices used at home to manage diabetes. The blood glucose meter readings of the people who dont have diabetes should be between 70 to 100 mg/dL at all times. The blood glucose measured after 8 hours without food, which is also called fasting blood glucose, should always be less than 100 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is a condition when a glucose level reading is below 70. If the fasting blood glucose level is between 100 to 125 mg/dL, a person may have impaired fasting glucose, also called prediabetes. Those with diabetes are when the level above 126 mg/dL. Controlling blood sugar levels helps not only control diabetes but also prevent developing diabetic complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, especially nerve damage. Urine tests are teststhat can be performed at home using self-test kits and a sample of the persons urine. For people withdiabetes, the urine test is most commonly used to look for ketones or microalbumin. Urine glucose can also be m Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Six Important Diabetes Tests

Six Important Diabetes Tests

Type 2 diabetes is incredibly common these days and it has the ability to affect every part of your body, right from your eyes to your feet. One of the best ways to prevent diabetes to mess with your body anymore than it already has is to go for routine tests and health checkups. These tests will identify potential problems at their very onset that is necessary to prevent complications and provide effective treatment. Did you know that you can prevent many diabetes complications by simply keeping up with your check-up schedule? Your doctor can identify potential health issues in their early stages through simple blood tests for diabetes and offer proper treatment options based on your condition. Who needs to undergo diabetes tests? Diabetes symptoms may not show up in its early stages. However, if you notice one or more of the following symptoms, then you should get yourself tested immediately. Feeling of fatigue all the time Feeling hungry even after full meal Feeling thirsty more frequently than normal Poor and unclear vision Taking more trips to the washroom than normal Cuts or wounds are taking longer than usual to heal While these are the common telltale signs of diabetes, some people should be tested even if there are no symptoms. People who have a body mass index greater than 25 are categorized as overweight and should consider testing for diabetes. You can also consider getting tested if you have a family history of diabetes. People who have low levels of physical activity or high blood pressure should also get a diabetes test done. Women with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or over the age of 45 automatically qualify for diabetes test. Some people actually do not have any symptoms and observe an abnormal blood sugar level that is an indication of Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Do you want to be very sure that you’re doing ok on the prediabetes front? Here is a Prediabetes Test method that is used by medical experts who believe you can never be too careful with blood sugar. Step 1 Get yourself a good quality home glucometer. It will help you monitoring the glucose levels regularly. Step 2 Fast overnight. Twelve hours is a must. So if you ate dinner at 7pm, nothing except water till 7am. Take the first reading. This is called your Fasting Blood Glucose or FBG. Note this down. Step 3 Take the next blood sugar reading just before starting lunch Step 4 Eat your typical lunch. Once you’re done with lunch, do not eat anything else for the next 3 hours. After one hour of lunch, test for sugar and note it down. Step 5 Two hours after lunch, test again Step 6 Last test due: 3hrs after lunch Repeat these tests for two days, recording what you ate and what you measured for each test. Now that you know how to test for diabetes at home, read on to find out what these test results mean. What Are We Measuring in Prediabetes Test? The first test (Fasting Blood Sugar or FBG) tells us how much sugar is floating in your blood after you’ve fasted for 12 hours. It should be at its lowest at this point. Remember: The American Diabetes Association classifies anyone with fasting blood sugar between 100-126 mg/DL or the equivalent of HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% as having prediabetes. We, however, know that sugar can do serious damage (cardiac damage, risk of cancer etc.) at far lower levels than this. So doctors keen to protect their patients from even slight prediabetes damage want to see a number less than 86 mg/DL on this test. Maintain a diabetes test results chart at a place you can see daily and fill in the numbers regularly to keep track of your blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Diabetes Home Tests Explained

Diabetes Home Tests Explained

What are diabetes home tests? Testing blood glucose (sugar) is an essential part of your diabetes care plan. Depending on your current condition, you may need to visit your doctor several times a year for formal testing. You may also need to go to your doctor for preventive testing, such as cholesterol checks and eye exams. While staying in touch with your doctor is important for staying on top of your treatment plan, you can and should test your blood sugar on your own, as long as your healthcare team advises you to. Self-monitoring your blood glucose may be vital to your treatment. Testing your own levels allows you to learn your blood sugar and manage it no matter the time of day or where you are. Learn how these tests work, and talk to your doctor about the benefits of self-monitoring. Your doctor will help you decide if you need to test your blood sugar at home. If you do, your doctor will work out how often and what times of day you should test. Your doctor will also tell you what your blood sugar targets are. You may consider diabetes home tests if you have: By keeping track of blood glucose, you can discover problems in your current diabetes care. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), normal blood glucose ranges between 70 and 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is below 70 mg/dL, and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is well above 140 mg/dL. By maintaining glucose at a normal range, you may help prevent diabetes complications such as: Blood glucose tests come in varying forms, but they all have the same purpose: to tell you what your blood sugar level is at that point in time. Most home tests come with: a lancet (small needle) a lancing, or lancet, device (to hold the needle) test strips a glucose met Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You Have Diabetes

How To Tell If You Have Diabetes

Expert Reviewed If you believe that you may have diabetes, consult a medical professional immediately. Type 1 diabetes is when the islet cells of your pancreas can no longer produce insulin; it is a type of autoimmune disease that makes them no longer functional. Type 2 diabetes is more lifestyle-related (relating to lack of exercise and consuming too much sugar). It is important to know the signs and symptoms of diabetes, as well as to understand how it is diagnosed, in order to be treated as soon as possible if you do have the condition. 1 Be aware of the following signs and symptoms. If you have two or more on the list below, it is best to see your doctor for further evaluation. Common signs and symptoms of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes include:[1] Excessive thirst Excessive hunger Blurry vision Frequent urination (you wake 3 or more times in the night to urinate) Fatigue (particularly after eating) Feeling irritable Wounds that don't heal or heal slowly 2 Take note of your lifestyle choices. People who live a sedentary life (with little to no exercise) are at a heightened risk of Type 2 diabetes. People who are overweight or obese, or who eat more sweets and refined carbohydrates than is ideal are also at significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.[2] Note that Type 2 diabetes is acquired in one's life, most often related to poor lifestyle choices, versus Type 1 diabetes which is a condition one is born with that most often presents in childhood. 3 See your doctor.[3] The only way to truly confirm whether or not you have diabetes is to see your doctor for diagnostic testing (in the form of blood tests). The numbers that come back on your blood tests will help to classify you as "normal," "pre-diabetic" (meaning you are at very high risk of soon develo Continue reading >>

5 Important Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Important Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

It takes more than just one abnormal blood test to diagnose diabetes.Istockphoto For centuries, diabetes testing mostly consisted of a physician dipping his pinkie into a urine sample and tasting it to pick up on abnormally high sugar. Thankfully, testing for type 2 diabetes is lot easier now—at least for doctors. Urine tests can still pick up diabetes. However, sugar levels need to be quite high (and diabetes more advanced) to be detected on a urine test, so this is not the test of choice for type 2 diabetes. Blood tests Almost all diabetes tests are now conducted on blood samples, which are collected in a visit to your physician or obstetrician (if you're pregnant). More about type 2 diabetes If you have an abnormal resultmeaning blood sugar is too high—on any of these tests, you'll need to have more testing. Many things can affect blood sugar (such as certain medications, illness, or stress). A diabetes diagnosis requires more than just one abnormal blood sugar result. The main types of diabetes blood tests include: Oral glucose-tolerance test. This test is most commonly performed during pregnancy. You typically have your blood drawn once, then drink a syrupy glucose solution and have your blood drawn at 30 to 60 minute intervals for up to three hours to see how your body is handling the glut of sugar. Normal result: Depends on how many grams of glucose are in the solution, which can vary. Fasting blood sugar. This is a common test because it's easy to perform. After fasting overnight, you have your blood drawn at an early morning doctor's visit and tested to see if your blood sugar is in the normal range. Normal result: 70-99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or less than 5.5 mmol/L Two-hour postprandial test. This blood test is done two hours after you have eate Continue reading >>

How To Beat Diabetes: Simple Test To Show If You Need Treatment

How To Beat Diabetes: Simple Test To Show If You Need Treatment

If you're in an at-risk group, you can get a free annual blood-glucose test The earlier diabetes is picked up, the better the prognosis, expert says One in three of us has raised blood-sugar levels, research suggests Some experts call these levels 'stage one diabetes' or 'pre-diabetes' So you think you might be at risk of type 2 diabetes — what next? If you are in one of the at-risk groups (over 25 and from a South Asian or Afro-Caribbean background, or Caucasian and over 40, particularly if you are overweight, obese or have a family history of diabetes) you can ask your GP for a free annual blood-glucose test. 'All the evidence shows that the earlier diabetes is picked up the better the prognosis, as it allows for better blood glucose control,' says Professor Anthony Barnett, a leading diabetes researcher based at Birmingham's Heartlands Hospital. 'A GP screening is best in a high-risk individual because it is free and they can then offer immediate treatment.' If you don't qualify for this, some chemists, such as Lloydspharmacy, will do a risk assessment involving a questionnaire looking at such factors as weight, age, diet and family history. If this indicates you are at risk of diabetes, you will be given a simple finger-prick blood test which checks your levels of glucose and gives immediate results. If your levels are above normal, you will be asked to come back and do a second test after fasting overnight. There are home test kits, which will give you the same reading as a pharmacy test, but a pharmacist's interpretation will be more informed, says Professor Barnett. People with borderline readings may benefit from a discussion with their GP, he adds. To get the most accurate result from a home test kit, he suggests taking it at least 1-2 hours after a meal, or Continue reading >>

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Everyone with diabetes should test their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. Knowing the results lets you tweak your strategy for keeping the disease in check, as needed. Regular testing can also help you avoid getting long-term health problems that can stem from the condition. Research shows that in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sticking to your target blood sugar and HbA1c levels makes complications less likely. 1. Traditional Home Glucose Monitoring You prick your finger with a lancet (a small, sharp needle), put a drop of blood on a test strip, and then place the strip into a meter that displays your blood sugar levels. Meters vary in features, portability, speed, size, cost, and readability (with larger displays or spoken instructions if you have vision problems). Devices deliver results in less than 15 seconds and store this information for future use. Some meters also calculate an average blood sugar level over a span of time. Some also feature software kits that take information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Blood sugar meters and strips are available at your local pharmacy. 2. Meters That Test Other Parts of Your Body. Some devices let you test you upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. These results may differ from the blood sugar levels gotten from a fingertip stick. Levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly. This is especially true when your sugar is changing fast, like after a meal or after exercise. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, don’t rely on test results from other parts of your body. 3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Some of these devices are combined with insulin pumps. They're not as accurate as finger-stick glucose results. But they can help you find p Continue reading >>

Lab Tests

Lab Tests

Lab Tests at Home Booking a lab test with Portea is quick and easy. Some of our wide range of lab tests includes Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Complete blood count, Fast Blood Sugar (FBS), Postprandial Blood Sugar (PPBS), Lipid Profile, Serum Creatinine, Uric Acid and more. We also provide complete body health check up packages for you and your family. You can either book a test online, via email or via call. Your samples will be collected at your doorstep and the reports will be delivered to you via email. View the entire list of lab tests available. Complete Body Health Check up Packages We offer complete body health check up packages for you and your family, keep in mind that annual health check up is really important as we grow up, because with the growing age we become more susceptible to various diseases so complete body health check is really important to detect health problems before they become serious or incurable. Few of the packages are: (Click here for detailed health check up packages) Comprising of sugar screening tests, cholesterol, lipid profile test and kidney tests, this package is designed for people who are diabetic or have irregular levels of sugar or glucose. Routine investigation, sugar screening tests, cholesterol, liver tests, thyroid tests and kidney tests are included in this executive health package for men. This one is an ideal package for people having hectic work life and excessive mental and physical stress. Executive health package for women includes routine investigations, sugar screening, lipid profile and thyroid tests which are very necessary for today’s women working busy schedules in stressful environment. People having busy lifestyle, irregular diet patterns, lack of sleep and physical activity etc. face huge risks of high BP, hea Continue reading >>

Testing

Testing

There are a range of tests which will need to be done to monitor your health and your diabetes. Some of these, such as your blood glucose levels, you will be able to do yourself. Others will be done by healthcare professionals. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes management. As part of the day-to-day routine it can help with necessary lifestyle and treatment choices as well as help to monitor for symptoms of hypo- or hyperglycaemia. Monitoring can also help you and your healthcare team to alter treatment which in turn can help prevent any long-term complications from developing. Some people with diabetes (but not all) will test their blood glucose levels at home. Home blood glucose testing gives an accurate picture of your blood glucose level at the time of the test. It involves pricking the side of your finger (as opposed to the pad) with a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. Some people can't see the point of testing as they think they know by the way they feel, but the way you feel is not always a good or accurate guide to what is happening. Blood glucose targets It is important that the blood glucose levels being aimed for are as near normal as possible (that is in the range of those of a person who does not have diabetes). These are: 3.5–5.5mmol/l* before meals less than 8mmol/l, two hours after meals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range to aim for. As this is so individual to each person, the target levels must be agreed between the person and their diabetes team. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide. Children with Type 1 diabetes (NICE 2015) on waking and before meals: 4–7mmol/l after meals: 5–9mmol/l.after meals: 5–9mmol/l. Adults with Type Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Testing blood sugar at home can be an effective way to treat and monitor your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the top 10 causes of death in North America. About 29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes – 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Suspecting that you or a loved one might have diabetes can be scary. It is a condition that causes sweeping changes to a person’s lifestyle. In most cases, because the early signs of diabetes are not known, being diagnosed comes as a shock. However, there are affordable tests that can be done at home to help diagnose diabetes in its early stages. But before you embark on home testing, it’s important to recognize the symptoms that can help you determine if home testing is necessary. Major symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Excessive hunger Fatigue Blurry vision Sores and cuts that won’t heal What are diabetic home tests? Although going in to see your doctor will give you accurate blood sugar readings, it can be a hassle making an appointment, waiting to see your doctor and traveling to and from the office. Instead you can do at home testing, which can help you better monitor and control your diabetes. There are different types of at-home tests you can complete daily to properly monitor your blood sugar levels. You can do a blood test, urine test or use an A1C kit. Those who would benefit from diabetic home testing are those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and individuals who are showing signs of diabetes. By keeping track of blood sugar levels you can gauge how your current treatment and lifestyle habits are affecting your condition. A normal blood sugar reading, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is between 70 and 140 mg/dL. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

Boots Home Testing Kits

Boots Home Testing Kits

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Are those home blood glucose testing kits any good from boots? I got 1 today and did one of the tests. There is 2 tests in the box so il do the other one some other time. The test is meant to detect diabetes early or something like that. I dont know what i have yet but i got a couple of yeast infections since xmas and i have been losing the hair on my legs which is weird. Some internet site mentioned diabetes so i thought il give the home test a try. Anyway the result of the test was 7 mmol . The information leaflet explained the results and this 7mmol is a little out of range. It said its meant to be between 4 - 6 mmol. I am not at all worried about it. But it also said that taking vitamin c within 24 hours can show the wrong result. Is this true? I am not at all worried but just like to find the reason to the hair loss on my legs, even though it is great. I did a Superdrug home testing kit last June, it said to do a fasting test but the first one b*$%!#d up and the second one was over 8. I went to the doctors and their machine said the same (can't remember exact figure - 8.3 I think) Mind you, that was when I was over a stone overweight and my blood pressure was higher than I would have liked as well. All back to normal now though, since then I've lost 1st 5 (2 lbs to go!) my BMI is 23 and my average blood pressure is 115/70 Continue reading >>

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