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Diabetes Cdl Requirements

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Truck drivers often work long hours, travel great distances and are responsible for the safe operation of large trucks. Long haul truck drivers have more than twice the risk of diabetes due to high stress and unhealthy food options. A study published in 2010 stated “”88% of truck drivers suffered from at least one risk factor including smoking, hypertension or obesity. There is a rate of 28% in long haul truck drivers at risk for sleep apnea, a condition which limits proper sleep”. Because of these problems, truck drivers may have been targeted about their health and driving. Recently there has been a lot of confusion about truckers with diabetes obtaining a CDL license. Learn more about the rules for truckers with diabetes. Years ago, there was a ban that prevented truck drivers with diabetes who used insulin from driving commercial vehicles for interstate operation. In 2003, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) introduced the Diabetes Exemption Program. This permitted people with insulin treated diabetes to drive a commercial vehicle in interstate commerce; however, you needed three years of previous commercial driving experience to qualify. By 2005, this was changed. Even if you are on insulin, there is no need to show previous commercial driving experience. While the new law alleviated the need to have previous driving experience for individuals with diabetes who take insulin, there are 57 provisions, guidelines and screenings to pass in order to get a CDL. Applicants must also watch state requirements related to obtaining a commercial driver license. Drivers with insulin treated diabetes must show they have control of the condition while on insulin. Those with type 1 diabetes must be on insulin for a minimum of 2 months before they can appl Continue reading >>

Fmcsa Moving Toward Dropping Diabetic Exemption Requirement

Fmcsa Moving Toward Dropping Diabetic Exemption Requirement

FMCSA Moving Toward Dropping Diabetic Exemption Requirement The Federal Motor Carrier Administration is seeking public comment on whether it should eliminate the requirement that drivers with insulin-treated diabetes seek a formal exemption from the agency to be allowed to operate a commercial vehicle. Specifically, FMCSA stated in the Federal Register for July 27 that it invites comment on a revision to its medical qualification requirements, covered by OMB Control Number 2126-0006), which is due to expire on August 31, 2018. The revision reflects the agencys anticipation of a final rule to revise its regulations to eliminate the blanket prohibition against insulin-dependent diabetic individuals' operation of commercial motor vehicles in interstate commerce." That rule would be based on a 2015 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and subsequent recommendations provided by FMCSA's Medical Review Board after an analysis of the comments received in response to the NPRM. Based on the MRB's analysis of the comments and their recommendations, the agency said it is considering replacing the previously proposed written notification from the treating clinician (TC) with a form titledInsulin-Treated Diabetes Mellitus Assessment Formto be completed by the TC and provided to the certified medical examiner (certified ME). This form could be required for CMV drivers treated with insulin for diabetes who wish to drive in interstate commerce. FMCSA is open to comment on both the proposed IC revision and the new assessment form that it is being considered. Click here to read theFederal Registernotice and to learn how to provide comments to the agency on the proposed revision and form. Continue reading >>

News Dedicated To A Healthy Workplace

News Dedicated To A Healthy Workplace

The Department of Transportation (DOT) Medical Examination is very highly regulated as illness complications can have serious consequences for the driver, the examiner, and the general public. DOT medical guidelines outline the health criteria that commercial vehicle drivers must meet to qualify for certification. One health condition that is closely reviewed by the DOT is diabetes. Individuals with known or suspected diabetes are required to provide specific medical information to the DOT-certifying physician regarding diabetic control. The DOT definition of diabetic control often causes confusion for individuals seeking certification, as well as their employers. The following information provides answers to common questions and clears up misconceptions about diabetes and DOT certification. The maximum certification for a person with diabetes is one year. According to DOT guidelines, a person with diabetes, whether controlled with diet alone or diet plus medication, must meet the following criteria: Maintain a glycosylated hemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C or “HBA1C”) of 8% or less. The HBA1C is a measure of the average amount of sugar in the blood over the last 3 months. A normal HBA1C is less than 5.7%. Values between 5.7 and 6.4% are classified as being in the pre-diabetic range. These individuals should be closely monitored. If the level is above 6.4%, then the person is diabetic. The HBA1C correlates very well with end organ (blood vessels, nerves, kidneys, heart, or eyes) damage and therefore is a popular marker for disease control. Red blood cells have a lifespan of about 90 days before they are removed by the spleen. Glucose sticks to the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Therefore, the glycosylated hemoglobin can be a good estimate of the average blood sugar and is Continue reading >>

End Of The Road: Diabetes Care When Insulin May Not Be An Option

End Of The Road: Diabetes Care When Insulin May Not Be An Option

Go to: PRESENTATION J.U. is a 53-year-old man with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes who requires a commercial driver’s license (CDL) for his occupation as a truck driver and mechanic. His diabetes was controlled with increasing doses of metformin and glipizide during the first 4 years after his diagnosis. Despite nutrition counseling, diabetes education classes, and physician visits every 3–6 months, nonadherence with therapeutic lifestyle changes contributed to his A1C fluctuating between 7.2 and 10.2% over 3 years. His health care provider recommended insulin therapy numerous times, but J.U.’s needle fear, lifestyle preferences, and fear of losing his job led to patient refusal and clinical inertia. He is seen for an urgent appointment after his Department of Transportation (DOT) physical was failed for hyperglycemia (glucose > 200 mg/dl) and significant levels of glucose in the urine. He reports fatigue, polyphagia, polydipsia, and polyuria. He has not been compliant with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or recommended therapeutic lifestyle changes. At the time of this visit, his diabetes medication regimen consists of metformin 1,000 mg twice daily and glipizide 10 mg twice daily with meals. His A1C is 8.1%, weight is 207 lb (BMI 32.5 kg/m2), blood pressure is 110/72 mmHg, pulse is 80 bpm, serum creatinine is 0.9 mg/dl, total cholesterol is 116 mg/dl, triglyceride level is 207 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol is 46 mg/dl, and HDL cholesterol is 29 mg/dl. He has a known history of hyperlipidemia treated with a statin, hypertension treated with an ACE inhibitor, and gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor. He has smoked two packs of cigarettes per day for 32 years, with multiple failed quit attempts, and denies alcohol or illicit drug use. Continue reading >>

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Certain truck drivers who suffer from diabetes will be allowed to operate commercial motor vehicles in spite of their health conditions, federal regulators said Tuesday. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is exempting dozens of truck drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes from rules that would otherwise prohibit them from operating a truck. "FMCSA evaluated the eligibility of the drivers and determined that granting the exemptions to these individuals would achieve a level of safety equivalent to or greater than the level that would be achieved by complying with the current regulation," the agency wrote in the Federal Register. The rules are intended to prevent truck drivers from endangering other drivers on the road. Federal regulators have begun cracking down on truckers who violate these and other safety regulations, particularly in the wake of the crash that nearly killed comedian Tracy Morgan. The FMCSA said Tuesday that these 72 drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes have it reasonably under control and do not pose any additional danger to other drivers on the road. They will receive a two-year exemption from the rules. The FMCSA is not exempting all drivers who use insulin from the rules, however — only those that it believes do not pose a risk on the roads. Furthermore, truck drivers that no longer need insulin to treat their diabetes are also exempt from the rules. Continue reading >>

Medical Standards For Commercial Driver's Licenses (cdl)

Medical Standards For Commercial Driver's Licenses (cdl)

You must meet minimum, federally-mandated medical standards to get a Commercial Driver's License (CDL). You are physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle if you either: Have an interstate medical exemption or a Massachusetts medical waiver Meet the physical qualification standards outlined in Federal Regulation § 391.41, found on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Website. To ensure that you meet these medical standards, you must pass a Department of Transportation (DOT) medical examination. A Department of Transportation (DOT) physical examination must be conducted by a licensed "medical examiner" listed on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) National Registry. Follow this link to find a medical examiner who is certified by the FMCSA to perform DOT physical exams: A DOT medical examiner's certificate is generated by this examination. Medical examiner's certificates are valid for a maximum of 2 years. In order to operate a commercial motor vehicle with a gross vehicle rating in excess of 10,000 pounds in interstate commerce, a medical examiner's certificate may also be required, even if you do not have a CDL. Interstate exemptions The federal government has a vision and diabetes medical exemption program for interstate commercial driving. If you do not meet the federal vision and/or diabetes medical standards, you may be able to obtain an exemption from those standards for interstate commerce from the federal government. A commercial driver who has obtained a medical interstate exemption should continue to have in his/her possession the original or copy of that medical exemption documentation at all times when operating a commercial vehicle. Massachusetts intrastate waivers The RMV will waive compliance with the f Continue reading >>

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

Have diabetes and want to pursue a CDL? While you will have to take some extra steps, it is totally possible and will be worth the effort if this is the career path you are passionate about. Some History First Prior to 2005, people with diabetes taking insulin were not able to become truck drivers. Thanks to a 2005 transportation bill, however, things have since changed. Now a person with Type 1 Diabetes who takes insulin is able to drive in interstate commerce. Although there are numerous requirements that the individual must meet, it is now possible for those with diabetes to become CDL drivers. What is Necessary to Obtain a CDL if You Have Diabetes Those with Type 2 diabetes that do not take insulin only need to follow their state guidelines related to obtaining and keeping a CDL. They will not need to file a Federal Diabetes Exemption and can still cross state lines; however, if you find out that you are going to be on insulin, you will have to file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Those with Type 1 Diabetes can get a CDL but will need to meet certain medical criteria and file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. To begin, applicants for the Federal Diabetes Exemption with Type 1 diabetes will need to have been taking their insulin for at least 2 months prior to applying for the exemption. Applicants with Type 2 diabetes must have been taking their insulin for one month. You will need to have a health evaluation performed by a physician that is listed as a “medical examiner” on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) National Registry. Other evaluations may include tests conducted by an endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, or optometrist. There is also a list of medical criteria which must be met, including: • You must not have had had one o Continue reading >>

Fmcsa Exemptions Proposed For Cdl Drivers With Diabetes, Vision And Hearing Requirements

Fmcsa Exemptions Proposed For Cdl Drivers With Diabetes, Vision And Hearing Requirements

FMCSA Exemptions Proposed For CDL Drivers with Diabetes, Vision and Hearing Requirements Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration published in the Federal Register in January 2015 their intent to allow Exemption Applications for Vision, Hearing and Diabetes Mellitus for qualification of drivers. FMCSA announces its decision to renew the exemptions from the vision requirement in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations for 21 individuals, from the hearing requirement for 15 individuals, and to exempt 32 individuals from its rule prohibiting persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The exemptions enable these individuals to operate CMVs in interstate commerce. FMCSA has statutory authority to exempt individuals from these requirements if the exemptions granted will not compromise safety. The Agency has concluded that granting these exemption renewals will provide a level of safety that is equivalent to or greater than the level of safety maintained without the exemptions for these commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers. This decision is effective January 12, 2015. Comments must be received on or before February 5, 2015. You may submit comments bearing the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) numbers: Docket No. FMCSA20120154 for the hearing comments, FMCSA Docket No. FMCSA20140307 for Diabetes and FMCSA20120279 for vision comments. Go to Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. FMCSA established the current requirement for diabetes in 1970 because several risk studies indicated that drivers with diabetes had a higher rate of crash involvement than the general population. The diabetes rule provides that A person is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor Continue reading >>

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) adapted medical guidelines that diabetic truck drivers must meet. They are part of the requirements for obtaining an interstate Commercial Driver’s License (CDL). At one point in time, a truck driver with diabetes had to prove they have had diabetic episodes for three years to qualify for the diabetic exemption program. Since the diabetic exemption program was revised, this qualification no longer applies. Read below to find out what the new DOT regulations mean for prospective truck drivers with diabetes. Changing DOT regulations for diabetic truck drivers The first diabetic exemption program was established in 2003. It contained a long list of stipulations that made it hard for diabetic truck drivers to qualify for their CDL. This kept many capable truck drivers from employment with interstate trucking companies. One of the main DOT regulations hindering diabetic drivers from qualifying for the exemption program was the three-year rule. The three-year rule stated truck drivers with diabetes must have a record of driving for three years without a diabetic episode, and must have been on insulin for that time. It prevented nearly all potential drivers with diabetes from meeting the old DOT regulations. Between 2003 and 2005, only four exemptions were granted to diabetic truck drivers. On November 8, 2005, the FMCSA overturned some of the rules stated in the 2003 diabetic exemption program. The agency made vital changes, opening the road to more diabetic truck drivers. The FMCSA started accepting applications for the revised diabetic exemption program on September 22, 2005. Implementing changes in the DOT program for diabetic truck drivers The 2005 DOT regulations for the Continue reading >>

Commercial Driver's Licenses-applicants With Diabetes

Commercial Driver's Licenses-applicants With Diabetes

Topic: DISEASES; AUTOMOBILE SAFETY STANDARDS; DRIVER LICENSES; DRIVER EDUCATION; Location: MOTOR VEHICLES - LICENSES; October 28, 2005 2005-R-0805 COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSES-APPLICANTS WITH DIABETES By: George Coppolo, Chief Attorney You asked if there is any new legislation about commercial driver's licenses (CDL) for people with diabetes. SUMMARY State law requires anyone driving a “commercial motor vehicle” in Connecticut to hold a CDL issued by Connecticut or some other state, with applicable endorsements valid for the vehicle he is driving (CGS § 14-44a). The CDL law defines a “commercial motor vehicle” as any vehicle (1) with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more; (2) designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver; (3) designed to transport 11 or more passengers, including the driver, and used to transport students under age 21 to and from school; or (4) transporting hazardous materials and required to have warning placards under federal hazardous materials transportation regulations (CGS § 14-1(a)(13)). Thus, some vehicles are commercial in nature, such as a truck with a gross weight rating of less than 26,000 pounds, but do not require the operator to have a CDL. The law exempts the following from CDL requirements: vehicles used for farming purposes within 150 miles of the farm, fire fighting apparatus, authorized emergency vehicles, recreational vehicles, and military vehicles operated by military personnel. Connecticut's laws on CDLs generally reflect the requirements of federal law. The federal Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established a program under which state-issued licenses for drivers of commercial motor vehicles have to meet minimum national standards. State law prohibits the motor vehicles Continue reading >>

Arizona Intrastate Diabetes Waiver Program

Arizona Intrastate Diabetes Waiver Program

Dear Applicant: Thank you for your interest in the Arizona Intrastate Diabetes Waiver Program. The information in this letter and the accompany materials need to be read carefully. The applicant is responsible for providing all required information. The following information required to be submitted: 1. Applicant Information Checklist; 2. Signed copy of the Medical Examination Report (completed by the Medical Examiner); 3. Signed copy of the Medical Examiner’s Certificate (completed by the Medical Examiner); 4. Endocrinologist Evaluation Checklist; 5. Vision Evaluation Checklist; How does the applicant apply for a waiver from the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) diabetes standard? A. Medical Examiner The applicant must be examined by a medical examiner, as defined in 49 CFR 390.5. The examiner can be a physician, (MD, DO), advanced nurse practitioner, physician assistant, or chiropractor if allowed by their state regulations to certify drivers. This examination STARTS the waiver process. The applicant MUST take the Certifying Medical Examiner Evaluation letter to the appointment with the medical examiner for him/her to review prior to performing the examination. In addition, the applicant must bring a copy of his/her 5 year medical history to the examination for the medical examiner to review. The medical examiner will have copies of the Arizona Department of Transportation Medical Examination Report Form and the Medical Examiner’s Certificate. The applicant must meet all medical standards and guidelines, other than diabetes, in accordance with Arizona Administrative Code (AAC) R 17-5-208 and 49 CFR 391.41 (b) (1-13). Other than the use of insulin to treat their diabetes, any other medical problem or condition that prevents the applicant from be Continue reading >>

Orlando Cdl Physical Facts: Diabetes And The Commercial Driver Physical Exam (cdl Medical Exam)

Orlando Cdl Physical Facts: Diabetes And The Commercial Driver Physical Exam (cdl Medical Exam)

Orlando CDL Physical Facts Will Diabetics Ever Rule the World? Maybe Not But At Least They Can Now Drive Around It for A Living Orlando CDL Physical Facts: Diabetes and the Commercial Driver Physical Exam ( CDL Medical Exam ) Not too long ago, being an insulin-dependent diabetic meant you couldnt drive commercially because you couldnt pass the CDL physical examor the CDL medical exam . Of course, this resulted in many drivers being considerably upset. But this was not the fault of any or all DOT physical locations or doctorsit was the law. Then, the law was changed in 2003 to add a Diabetes Exemption as part of the commercial driver physical exam (CDL physical / CDL physical exam) process. Yet, to qualify for this diabetes exemption you already had to have been driving commercially for 3 years with your insulin-dependent diabetes under control (A1C of 7 10) as evidenced by a successful commercial driver medical exam that covered the full range of physical tests and testing. Because this exemption caught most of these drivers in a catch-22 (they couldnt previously drive with insulin-dependent diabetes but had to have been driving for 3 years while being insulin-dependent in order to qualify for the exemption), only 4 people were able to pass the CDL physical exam and obtain their CDL physical certification between 2003 and 2005. In 2005, the law regarding diabetics and the commercial driver physical exam was amended. Intrastate insulin-dependent drivers are able to be certified. Interstate drivers on the other hand, must still qualify for the commercial driver physical exemption as determined by the commercial driver physical exam (CDL physical / CDL physical exam). Unfortunately, the exemption to the CDL physical requirements regarding insulin-treated diabetes, can tak Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Tom Milam, CEO of health care provider TrueLifeCare, will tell you that there are three things motor carriers and their drivers need to know about diabetes and how it impacts the trucking industry: There's a 50% higher occurrence of diabetes in truck drivers than the national average; Drivers with diabetes can apply for a medical waiver with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to allow them to operate a commercial vehicle, as long as they meet its specific criteria; Yet while the use of insulin is no longer a complete barrier to being able to operate a commercial vehicle on the road, a driver must be able to prove they are maintaining stable blood sugars; not an easy task. “Managing diabetes on one's own is a daunting task. Add to that the high mobility of truck drivers and it's nearly impossible,” Milam explained to Fleet Owner. “That’s where companies like ours come into play; developing diabetes management programs for employers who have high incidences of diabetes in their workforce,” he added. “We coach drivers – via telephone – about ways to manage their disease and stabilize blood sugars in order to keep them healthy and on the road.” Milam said there are two key facts fleets need to keep in mind diabetes: First, that there is no cure and, second, diabetes is progressive, meaning that as symptoms worsen, the disease causes more harm to your body, especially without attentive personal management. “The most immediate impact for drivers with diabetes is losing their jobs,” he stressed. “Truck drivers can lose their ability to drive if they require insulin to manage their disease, an almost automatic ‘do not certify’ condition,” Milam said. “Today, nearly 20% of all people with diabetes use insulin therapy. While dr Continue reading >>

Qualifications Of Drivers; Diabetes Standard

Qualifications Of Drivers; Diabetes Standard

Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). FMCSA proposes to permit drivers with stable, well-controlled insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) to be qualified to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. Currently, drivers with ITDM are prohibited from driving CMVs in interstate commerce unless they obtain an exemption from FMCSA. This NPRM would enable individuals with ITDM to obtain a Medical Examiner's Certificate (MEC), from a medical examiner (ME) at least annually in order to operate in interstate commerce if the treating clinician (TC) who is the healthcare professional responsible for prescribing insulin for the driver's diabetes, provides documentation to the ME that the condition is stable and well-controlled. You must submit comments on or before July 6, 2015. You may submit comments identified by docket number FMCSA-2005-23151 using any one of the following methods: To avoid duplication, please use only one of these four methods. See the “Public Participation and Request for Comments” heading under the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below for instructions regarding submitting comments. If you have questions about this proposed rule, contact Ms. Linda Phillips, Medical Programs Division, FMCSA, 1200 New Jersey Ave SE., Washington DC 20590-0001, by telephone at 202-366-4001, or by email at [email protected] If you have questions about viewing or submitting material to the docket, call Ms. Barbara Hairston, Program Manager, Docket Services, telephone 202-366-9826. Table of Contents for Preamble A. Purpose and Summary of the Major Provisions B. Benefits and Costs C. Privacy Act IV. Legal Basis for the Rulemaking B. Brief History of Physical Qualification Standards for CMV Drivers With ITDM VI. Reasons for the Proposed Changes B. W Continue reading >>

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

In this article we will explore what it takes to get a commercial driver’s license with diabetes, and how to get an insulin waiver for Type 1 and Type 2 persons who use insulin. We will look at requirements for Type 1 vs. Type 2 diabetes. We will look at insulin vs. non-insulin users. We will look at state vs. interstate CDL requirements. We will also look at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) diabetes waiver program, and how you can be evaluated to drive a commercial vehicle across state lines when you have diabetes and use insulin. Intrastate guidelines for CDL with diabetes If you want to work in the trucking industry only within your state, and you do not plan to cross any state lines, you can get approved to drive a commercial vehicle in your state. For drivers driving within state lines, you do not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Likewise, you would not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if you do not use insulin. Whatever rules and regulations your state has for holding a CDL with diabetes is what you have to follow for intrastate or interstate trucking. It is important to know that most commercial driving will be considered interstate, not intrastate driving, even if you do not cross state lines. If you are carrying cargo or passengers to or from another state, this is also considered as interstate commercial driving. For information on intrastate commercial driving, check with your home state for CDL requirements and see if they are applicable to you. They vary from state to state, with each state having its own regulations. You can look up the laws governing your state by visiting this page at the American Diabetes Association website, You can type your home state in the search for laws and requirements fo Continue reading >>

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