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Diabetes Causes Death

Mortality And Causes Of Death In A National Sample Of Diabetic Patients In Taiwan

Mortality And Causes Of Death In A National Sample Of Diabetic Patients In Taiwan

OBJECTIVE—To determine the mortality rate, causes of death, and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in Taiwanese diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A cohort of 256,036 diabetic patients (118,855 men and 137,181 women, aged 61.2 ± 15.2 years) using the National Health Insurance were assembled during the years 1995–1998 and followed up to the end of 2001. Deaths were verified by indexing to the National Register of Deaths. Underlying causes of death were determined from death certificates coded according to the ninth revision of the International Classification of Diseases. The general population of Taiwan was used as reference for SMR calculation. RESULTS—With a total of 1,124,348.4 person-years of follow-up, 43,888 patients died and the crude mortality rate was 39.0/1,000 person-years. Mortality rates increased with age, and diabetic men had a significantly higher risk of death than women. However, mortality rate ratio for men versus women attenuated with increasing age. The overall SMR was 1.63 (1.62–1.65), and SMRs also attenuated in the elderly. Causes of death ascribed to diabetes; cancer; cardiopulmonary disease; stroke; disease of arteries, arterioles, and capillaries; nephropathy; infection; digestive diseases; accidents; and suicide were 28.8, 18.5, 9.0, 10.5, 0.3, 4.8, 6.4, 7.9, 3.2, and 0.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS—Approximately 71.2% of the diabetes-related deaths would not be ascribed to diabetes on death certificates in Taiwan. The diabetic men have higher risk of dying than women, and diabetic patients have excess mortality when compared with the general population. For underlying causes of death not listed as diabetes, total cardiovascular death, including cardiopulmonary disease, stroke, and disease of arteries, arterioles, and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Raises Risk Of Death From All Causes, Says Study

Diabetes Raises Risk Of Death From All Causes, Says Study

Print Font: NEW YORK — A 50-year-old with diabetes dies six years sooner than someone without the disease, and not just from a heart attack or a stroke, new research suggests. The large international effort to measure diabetes' toll found the disease also raises the risk of dying prematurely from a host of other ailments, even breast cancer and pneumonia. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. "It's quite a wide sweep of conditions," said Dr. John Danesh of Cambridge University in Britain, who led the team of researchers. While most people think of heart problems, diabetes surprisingly "appears to be associated with a much broader range of health implications than previously suspected." Putting the six years lost in context, he said, long-term smoking shortens life by 10 years. The analysis used pooled medical information for 820,900 people from nearly 100 studies done mostly in Europe and North America. The results are published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine. Diabetes, the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., affects about 26 million Americans, or 8 percent, including 7 million who haven't been diagnosed. Most in the study were thought to have the most common kind — Type 2 — which occurs when the body makes too little insulin or cannot use what it does make to regulate blood sugar. High blood sugar can damage nerves and blood vessels, and is a major cause of heart disease. The Continue reading >>

Study: Diabetes Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The Us

Study: Diabetes Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The Us

A new study’s results suggest that diabetes is now the third leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes has been known to be a leading cause of death in the United States but a new study that sought to find the number of deaths attributable to diabetes in the US shows it may be even more of a concern than it already is. The researchers wrote in their study abstract that the number of deaths in which diabetes was named to be the underlying cause of death “severely understated the contribution of diabetes to mortality in the United States”. Diabetes Cases Rising Everywhere The researchers wrote that the prevalence of diabetes has been going up quickly all throughout the world. Since diabetes is linked to diseases and other problems like “ischemic heart disease, renal disease, visual impairment, peripheral artery disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment” it contributes to a very heavy burden that isn’t always closely identified with diabetes. They added that diabetes “was listed as the underlying cause of death on 69,091 death certificates (2.8% of total deaths) and appeared in some location on a total of 234,051 death certificates.” Then they note however, that this frequency in listing diabetes as an underlying cause of death isn’t a good way to know the actual contribution of diabetes on the national mortality profile. This is because in administrative records or surveys, researchers have found that there is much more listing of diabetes as an underlying cause of death versus on the death certificates. As others have made the case before, diabetes, which tends to coexist with other health problems in each patient, is a major health detriment and thus, contributes to mortality more than is generally believed. What Do Scientist Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Diabetes is amongst the foremost leading cause of deaths in most of the countries. Today, the disease is widespread like an epidemic and the several complications which diabetes leads to often make people wonder #Can you Die from Diabetes?”. Well, although the answer to the above question cannot be a straight “Yes”, there is no denying of the fact that diabetes can, in fact, turn out to be a deadly disease. As per a report circulated by Diabetes UK, the life expectancy of a type 1 diabetes patient can be reduced by 20 years, while the same can be reduced by 10 in the case of a type 1 diabetes patient. This, of course, can be controlled by adopting a healthy lifestyle and controlling your blood sugar levels. Some of the ways in which you can die from diabetes include the following: High Blood Glucose Levels: The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is the inability to keep the blood glucose levels under control. Lipid Disorders: With diabetes comes a host of various other complications such as heart diseases, kidney disorders, amongst others. The leading cause of these complications is the disorder of the lipids in a diabetic patient. Diabetes Ketoacidosis: The high sugar level in the blood which is a characteristic of diabetes often leads to the high amount of ketone cells in the body. These ketones could be extremely deadly, causing deaths in patients. Complications: Diabetes is known to cause several complications in patients which adversely affect the functioning of the heart, kidney, eyes, and even nerves of different body parts. Any of these complications can become serious and lead to the death of the patient. Hence, can you die from diabetes? Well, yes you can. However, with proper care, regular exercise, following a proper diet, and taking timely me Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Complications caused by diabetes People with diabetes must routinely monitor and regulate their blood sugar. No matter how careful you may be, there’s still a possibility that a problem might arise. There are two types of complications you may experience: acute and chronic. Acute complications require emergency care. Examples include hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. If left untreated, these conditions can cause: seizures loss of consciousness death Chronic complications occur when diabetes isn’t managed properly. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels. If not controlled well over time, high blood sugar levels can damage various organs, including the: eyes kidneys heart skin Unmanaged diabetes can also cause nerve damage. People with diabetes can experience sudden drops in their blood sugar. Skipping a meal or taking too much insulin or other medications that increase insulin levels in the body are common causes. People who are on other diabetes medications that do not increase insulin levels are not at risk for hypoglycemia. Symptoms can include: blurry vision rapid heartbeat headache shaking dizziness If your blood sugar gets too low, you can experience fainting, seizures, or coma. This is a complication of diabetes that occurs when your body cannot use sugar, or glucose, as a fuel source because your body has no insulin or not enough insulin. If your cells are starved for energy, your body begins to break down fat. Potentially toxic acids called ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fat breakdown, build up in the body. This can lead to: dehydration abdominal pain breathing problems Diabetes can damage blood vessels in the eyes and cause various problems. Possible eye conditions may include: Cataracts Cataracts are two to five times more likely to develop in people Continue reading >>

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

Survey estimates that diabetes accounts for many more deaths in the United States than are being reported on death certificates — and that diabetes is actually the third leading cause of death. So when a patient dies from a heart attack, stroke or heart disease that is caused by diabetes or when a patient dies from kidney failure, or if a patient dies 6 months after an amputation, the death certificate does not say that the death was caused by diabetes. About 12% of deaths in 30- to 84-year-olds from 1997 to 2011 could be attributed to diabetes, the latest data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate. But during that time, only 3.3% of death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. The prevalence of diabetes has been rising rapidly throughout the world. Global age-standardized diabetes prevalence increased from an estimated 4.3% in 1980 to 9.0% in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% to 7.9% in women. The United States is no exception to this trend. Using combined criteria of self-reported diagnosis, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c, the prevalence of diabetes among adults aged 20+ rose from 8.4% in 1988–94 to 12.1% in 2005–10. Trends are similar when HbA1c is the sole criterion. Diabetes is associated with many diseases and disabilities, including ischemic heart disease, renal disease, visual impairment, peripheral arterial disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment. And it can increase the risk for many other diseases, even cancer. It is also associated with mortality. In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. It was listed as the underlying cause of death on 69,091 death certificates (2.8% of total deaths) a Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

Top 10 causes of death worldwide Of the 56.4 million deaths worldwide in 2015, more than half (54%) were due to the top 10 causes. Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are the world’s biggest killers, accounting for a combined 15 million deaths in 2015. These diseases have remained the leading causes of death globally in the last 15 years. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease claimed 3.2 million lives in 2015, while lung cancer (along with trachea and bronchus cancers) caused 1.7 million deaths. Diabetes killed 1.6 million people in 2015, up from less than 1 million in 2000. Deaths due to dementias more than doubled between 2000 and 2015, making it the 7th leading cause of global deaths in 2015. Lower respiratory infections remained the most deadly communicable disease, causing 3.2 million deaths worldwide in 2015. The death rate from diarrhoeal diseases almost halved between 2000 and 2015, but still caused 1.4 million deaths in 2015. Similarly, tuberculosis killed fewer people during the same period, but is still among the top 10 causes with a death toll of 1.4 million. HIV/AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death, having killed 1.1 million people in 2015 compared with 1.5 million in 2000. Road injuries killed 1.3 million people in 2015, about three-quarters (76%) of whom were men and boys. Leading causes of death by economy income group More than half (52%) of all deaths in low-income countries in 2015 were caused by the so-called “Group I” conditions, which include communicable diseases, maternal causes, conditions arising during pregnancy and childbirth, and nutritional deficiencies. By contrast, less than 7% of deaths in high-income countries were due to such causes. Lower respiratory infections were among the leading causes of death across Continue reading >>

Causes Of Death In Japanese Patients With Diabetes Based On The Results Of A Survey Of 45,708 Cases During 20012010: Report Of The Committee On Causes Of Death In Diabetes Mellitus

Causes Of Death In Japanese Patients With Diabetes Based On The Results Of A Survey Of 45,708 Cases During 20012010: Report Of The Committee On Causes Of Death In Diabetes Mellitus

Causes of death in Japanese patients with diabetes based on the results of a survey of 45,708 cases during 20012010: Report of the Committee on Causes of Death in Diabetes Mellitus 1Division of Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Japan 2Division of Metabolism and Biosystemic Science, Department of Medicine, Nobuya, Japan 3Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan 4Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, Hematological Science and Therapeutics, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Japan 5Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan 6Department of Molecular Sciences on Diabetes, The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan 7Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Jiro Nakamura, Email: [email protected] . Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer Received 2017 Jan 19; Accepted 2017 Feb 7. Copyright 2017 Japan Diabetes Society (JDS). Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercialNoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is noncommercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The principal causes of death among 45,708 patients with diabetes (29,801 men and 15,907 women) who died in 241 hospitals throughout Japan during 20012010 were determined based on a survey of the Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Q. How do people die from diabetes? A. People who have diabetes cannot regulate their blood sugar levels and if the disease isn’t tightly controlled, blood sugar can spike to abnormally high levels, a condition called hyperglycemia, or dip below normal, a condition called hypoglycemia. Both conditions are potentially life-threatening and can lead to coma and death if not promptly treated. But complications resulting from the disease are a more common cause of death. Heart disease strikes people with diabetes at significantly higher rates than people without diabetes, “and we don’t fully know why,” said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. People with diabetes develop heart disease at younger ages and are nearly twice as likely to die of heart attack or stroke as people who do not have diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes, which is the more common form of the disease, are more likely to have elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity, Dr. Gabbay said, all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. “The good news,” he said, “is that a lot of treatments, like those for lowering cholesterol, are even more effective at lowering risk in people with diabetes than in people without.” Some new classes of diabetes medications used for Type 2 diabetes have also been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk, he said. People with Type 1 diabetes are also at increased risk for heart disease, though the reasons are less clear. Both types of diabetes can also lead to other long-term complications, like kidney disease, that may result in premature death. Problems like vision loss, nerve damage and infections that may lead to amputations can increase the likelihood of injuries and accidents. Good disease management starting ea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Linked To All-cause And Sudden Death In The Young

Diabetes Linked To All-cause And Sudden Death In The Young

Diabetes Linked to All-Cause and Sudden Death in the Young ANAHEIM, CA Among patients ranging in age from infants to young adults who died in Denmark over the course of a decade, rates of all-cause death and sudden cardiac death were disproportionately higher among those who had type 1 or type 2 diabetes compared with those without diabetes, in a new study[ 1 ]. The findings showed that during a 10-year period, people aged 1 to 49 years with diabetes had a fivefold increased risk of all-cause death and a sevenfold increased risk of sudden cardiac death compared with their peers without diabetes, Jesper Svane (Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark) told a press conference here. He presented their results at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2017 Scientific Sessions . "We always knew that persons with diabetes have increased risks of all kinds of diseases and dying, but I think it's underestimated how much diabetes has an impact among the young and particularly on heart disease," Svane told theheart.org|Medscape Cardiology. "We know from previous studies that persons who die from sudden cardiac arrest have complained about either chest pain or syncope prior to death, so particularly among persons with diabetes, this needs to be taken seriously," he said. The study is "another spotlight" showing that "diabetes is a powerful predictor of premature heart disease and that we should be that much more careful in those patients, even in young people," AHA spokesperson Dr Vincent Bufalino (Advocate Health Care, Chicago) said in an interview. However, the registry lacked data about patient symptoms, glycemic control, or use of an insulin pump, Svane admitted, so some of the deaths classified as due to sudden cardiac arrest may have been related to glycemia. I Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes

What Is Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body cannot make good use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, that acts like a key to let glucose from the food we eat pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to produce energy. All carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose in the blood. Insulin helps glucose get into the cells. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (known as hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high glucose levels are associated with damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Continue reading >>

Risk Of Cause-specific Death In Individuals With Diabetes: A Competing Risks Analysis

Risk Of Cause-specific Death In Individuals With Diabetes: A Competing Risks Analysis

OBJECTIVE Diabetes is a common cause of shortened life expectancy. We aimed to assess the association between diabetes and cause-specific death. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used the pooled analysis of individual data from 12 Spanish population cohorts with 10-year follow-up. Participants had no previous history of cardiovascular diseases and were 35–79 years old. Diabetes status was self-reported or defined as glycemia >125 mg/dL at baseline. Vital status and causes of death were ascertained by medical records review and linkage with the official death registry. The hazard ratios and cumulative mortality function were assessed with two approaches, with and without competing risks: proportional subdistribution hazard (PSH) and cause-specific hazard (CSH), respectively. Multivariate analyses were fitted for cardiovascular, cancer, and noncardiovascular noncancer deaths. RESULTS We included 55,292 individuals (15.6% with diabetes and overall mortality of 9.1%). The adjusted hazard ratios showed that diabetes increased mortality risk: 1) cardiovascular death, CSH = 2.03 (95% CI 1.63–2.52) and PSH = 1.99 (1.60–2.49) in men; and CSH = 2.28 (1.75–2.97) and PSH = 2.23 (1.70–2.91) in women; 2) cancer death, CSH = 1.37 (1.13–1.67) and PSH = 1.35 (1.10–1.65) in men; and CSH = 1.68 (1.29–2.20) and PSH = 1.66 (1.25–2.19) in women; and 3) noncardiovascular noncancer death, CSH = 1.53 (1.23–1.91) and PSH = 1.50 (1.20–1.89) in men; and CSH = 1.89 (1.43–2.48) and PSH = 1.84 (1.39–2.45) in women. In all instances, the cumulative mortality function was significantly higher in individuals with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is associated with premature death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and noncardiovascular noncancer causes. The use of CSH and PSH prov Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

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