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Diabetes Cause Of Death Rank

Is Diabetes The Third-leading Cause Of Death?

Is Diabetes The Third-leading Cause Of Death?

The Centers for Disease Control lists diabetes as the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. at 76,488 people per year. However, a new study done by researchers at Boston University School of Public Health found that almost four times as many Americans die of diabetes than as reported on death certificates. Without clear guidelines for which conditions to cite as the cause of death and with the U.S.’s fragmented health care system, it can be hard for current treating physicians to know all of the relevant information about a patient to make that decision. “We argue diabetes is responsible for 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., rather than 3.3 percent that death certificates indicate,” Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health at the Boston University School of Public Health and lead study author, said in an interview. What is diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, making the body unable to produce enough insulin to process sugar. There is no clear cause for type 1 diabetes, and those with it are usually diagnosed before 40—most commonly in children. Type 2 diabetes, caused by genetics and lifestyle factors, occurs when the body can’t use the insulin it produces. Type 2 is by far the most common, affecting 95 percent of those with the disease. Prediabetes, while less serious, is also dangerous. In people with prediabetes, their blood sugar is higher than normal, and without any lifestyle changes, they are likely to develop diabetes. Though these conditions collectively affect 1 in 3 people, most don’t know they have it. In fact, 25 percent of people with diabetes go undiagnosed, and that number jumps to 90 percent for prediabetes. Prevention is the best cure There is no cure for diabetes, Continue reading >>

Study: Diabetes Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The Us

Study: Diabetes Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The Us

A new study’s results suggest that diabetes is now the third leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes has been known to be a leading cause of death in the United States but a new study that sought to find the number of deaths attributable to diabetes in the US shows it may be even more of a concern than it already is. The researchers wrote in their study abstract that the number of deaths in which diabetes was named to be the underlying cause of death “severely understated the contribution of diabetes to mortality in the United States”. Diabetes Cases Rising Everywhere The researchers wrote that the prevalence of diabetes has been going up quickly all throughout the world. Since diabetes is linked to diseases and other problems like “ischemic heart disease, renal disease, visual impairment, peripheral artery disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment” it contributes to a very heavy burden that isn’t always closely identified with diabetes. They added that diabetes “was listed as the underlying cause of death on 69,091 death certificates (2.8% of total deaths) and appeared in some location on a total of 234,051 death certificates.” Then they note however, that this frequency in listing diabetes as an underlying cause of death isn’t a good way to know the actual contribution of diabetes on the national mortality profile. This is because in administrative records or surveys, researchers have found that there is much more listing of diabetes as an underlying cause of death versus on the death certificates. As others have made the case before, diabetes, which tends to coexist with other health problems in each patient, is a major health detriment and thus, contributes to mortality more than is generally believed. What Do Scientist Continue reading >>

Number Of Diabetes Deaths Per 100,000 Population

Number Of Diabetes Deaths Per 100,000 Population

Age-adjusted rates per 100,000 U.S. standard population. Rates for the United States and each state are based on populations enumerated in the 2010 census as of July 1, 2013. Since death rates are affected by the population composition of a given area, age-adjusted death rates should be used for comparisons between areas because they control for differences in population composition. Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

The Disease That May Be A Leading Cause Of Death

Survey estimates that diabetes accounts for many more deaths in the United States than are being reported on death certificates — and that diabetes is actually the third leading cause of death. So when a patient dies from a heart attack, stroke or heart disease that is caused by diabetes or when a patient dies from kidney failure, or if a patient dies 6 months after an amputation, the death certificate does not say that the death was caused by diabetes. About 12% of deaths in 30- to 84-year-olds from 1997 to 2011 could be attributed to diabetes, the latest data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate. But during that time, only 3.3% of death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. The prevalence of diabetes has been rising rapidly throughout the world. Global age-standardized diabetes prevalence increased from an estimated 4.3% in 1980 to 9.0% in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% to 7.9% in women. The United States is no exception to this trend. Using combined criteria of self-reported diagnosis, fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c, the prevalence of diabetes among adults aged 20+ rose from 8.4% in 1988–94 to 12.1% in 2005–10. Trends are similar when HbA1c is the sole criterion. Diabetes is associated with many diseases and disabilities, including ischemic heart disease, renal disease, visual impairment, peripheral arterial disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment. And it can increase the risk for many other diseases, even cancer. It is also associated with mortality. In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. It was listed as the underlying cause of death on 69,091 death certificates (2.8% of total deaths) a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Third-leading Cause Of Death In The Us, Researchers Warn

Diabetes Is Third-leading Cause Of Death In The Us, Researchers Warn

CGM use drives better type 1 diabetes treatment in people on multiple daily injections Diabetes leads to more deaths in the US than was previously believed, according to new research. Scientists have suggested that diabetes is the third-leading cause of death in the US and accounts for 12 per cent of mortalities. Previous research reported that diabetes accounted for just four per cent of deaths in the US. While the findings are indeed concerning, there is no reason why people with diabetes can't go on to live long, healthy lives by keeping good control of their blood sugar levels, eating healthily and getting regular exercise. The research was based upon health records of people on the National Health Interview Survey and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The team looked at health trends and mortality rates in the population. They found that complications from diabetes can mask a single reason for a fatality, resulting in diabetes not being listed as the underlying cause of death as frequently as it should be. Diabetes is currently listed as the seventh most common reason for death by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but the researchers are calling for changes to be made at a national level to counteract the growing effect diabetes is having in the US. "In the case of diabetes, the burden is potentially obscured because of underreporting," said co-lead author Samuel Preston, a professor of sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. "Our work aims to reveal that diabetes is a much more important cause than is appreciated." The researchers added that their findings "reinforce the need for robust population-level interventions aimed at diabetes prevention and care." The findings appear online in the PLOS ONE journal. Tweet Type Continue reading >>

Top 10 Causes Of Death In Men

Top 10 Causes Of Death In Men

Men have shorter life expectancies than women. While we will all die eventually, there are things we can do to live longer and healthier lives, which improves the overall quality of our lives and our families lives. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2003 just over one million American men died of heart disease or one of the nine other leading causes of death. That represents 80 percent of all deaths by men that year. Men are more likely than women to die from most of these causes. Luckily, because many of these causes can be prevented, men can take steps to avoid them by knowing the symptoms, by having regular checkups by a doctor or health care provider and by taking steps to live a healthier life. Heart Disease Cancer Unintentional Injuries Stroke Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (LungDiseases) Diabetes Influenza and Pneumonia Suicide Kidney Disease Alzheimer’s Disease Heart disease is a term that includes many specific heart conditions. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), coronary artery disease (CAD), which can lead to heart attacks, is the most common heart disease in the United States. Other heart conditions include chest pain known as angina, heart failure and irregular heart beats known as arrhythmias. About Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) CAD develops when arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle become hardened and narrowed from plaque buildup. Because buildup reduces blood flow, and therefore oxygen, to the heart it can lead to a heart attack. Statistics Because men usually develop heart disease 10 to 15 years earlier than women, men are more likely to die of it in the prime of life. (American Heart Association) Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and w Continue reading >>

Deaths From Diabetes Are Under-reported In National Mortality Statistics.

Deaths From Diabetes Are Under-reported In National Mortality Statistics.

Abstract Subjects with diabetes who attended rural surveys in Western Australia from 1978 to 1982 were followed up to ascertain death rates and the causes of death recorded on death certificates. Cardiovascular disease was assigned as the direct cause of death in 63% of deaths, with equal rates in male and female subjects, and renal disease in 8% of deaths with the proportion in women (12%) being greater than that in men (4%). The diagnosis of diabetes was stated on only 65% of the death certificates, and in only 24% was diabetes recorded as a direct or antecedent cause. In the same cohort the Australian Bureau of Statistics coded diabetes as the underlying cause of death in 24%, while attributing deaths to cardiovascular disease in 50% of the cases. This study suggests that diabetes is considerably underreported both on doctors' death certificates and in the mortality figures of the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Deaths Attributable To Diabetes In The United States: Comparison Of Data Sources And Estimation Approaches

Deaths Attributable To Diabetes In The United States: Comparison Of Data Sources And Estimation Approaches

Abstract The goal of this research was to identify the fraction of deaths attributable to diabetes in the United States. We estimated population attributable fractions (PAF) for cohorts aged 30–84 who were surveyed in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) between 1997 and 2009 (N = 282,322) and in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2010 (N = 21,814). Cohort members were followed prospectively for mortality through 2011. We identified diabetes status using self-reported diagnoses in both NHIS and NHANES and using HbA1c in NHANES. Hazard ratios associated with diabetes were estimated using Cox model adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and smoking status. We found a high degree of consistency between data sets and definitions of diabetes in the hazard ratios, estimates of diabetes prevalence, and estimates of the proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes. The proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes was estimated to be 11.5% using self-reports in NHIS, 11.7% using self-reports in NHANES, and 11.8% using HbA1c in NHANES. Among the sub-groups that we examined, the PAF was highest among obese persons at 19.4%. The proportion of deaths in which diabetes was assigned as the underlying cause of death (3.3–3.7%) severely understated the contribution of diabetes to mortality in the United States. Diabetes may represent a more prominent factor in American mortality than is commonly appreciated, reinforcing the need for robust population-level interventions aimed at diabetes prevention and care. Figures Citation: Stokes A, Preston SH (2017) Deaths Attributable to Diabetes in the United States: Comparison of Data Sources and Estimation Approaches. PLoS ONE 12(1): e0170219. Editor: C. Mary School Continue reading >>

Media Release: Mortality And Causes Of Death, 2015

Media Release: Mortality And Causes Of Death, 2015

Non-communicable diseases remain unabated – older ages 65 and above driving the burden of disease A total of 460 236 deaths were recorded in South Africa in 2015, indicating a decline of 3,0% in deaths processed between 2015 and 2014 (474 659), this is according to the Mortality and causes of death, 2015 report released by Statistics South Africa today. The three leading causes of natural deaths in 2014 were tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus and cerebrovascular diseases. Although tuberculosis maintained its rank as the number one leading cause of death in South Africa, non-communicable diseases continue their rise in the rankings of top 10 leading causes with diabetes mellitus moving from third position in 2014 to second position in 2015. Non-communicable diseases formed 60% of the ten leading underlying natural causes of death. In addition to diabetes mellitus; cerebrovascular diseases, other forms of heart disease, hypertensive diseases, chronic lower respiratory diseases and ischaemic heart diseases contributed to the rise in non-communicable diseases. The continued rise in non-communicable diseases has been fuelled by males and females aged 65 and above. Females in this age group had nine out of ten non-communicable diseases in the leading causes, whilst men and eight of out ten as leading causes of natural deaths. Non-communicable diseases are accountable for 62,5% in the top 10 leading causes of death among females aged 65 and above, whereas among males in the same age group these constituted 48,0%. The second age group leading to a rise in deaths due to non-communicable diseases are those aged 45 to 64 years. For both males and females, six of the top ten leading causes of death were due to non-communicable diseases, accounting for 27,7% for females and 32,5% amo Continue reading >>

Causes Of Death Statistics

Causes Of Death Statistics

This article gives an overview of recent statistics on causes of death in the European Union (EU). By relating all deaths in the population to an underlying cause of death, the risks associated with death from a range of specific diseases and other causes can be assessed; these figures can be further analysed by age, sex, country where the death occurred/residency of the deceased, and region (NUTS level 2), using standardised death rates. Main statistical findings The latest estimated information for the EU-28 relating to causes of death is available for the 2014 reference period. Table 1 shows that diseases of the circulatory system and cancer (malignant neoplasms) were, by far, the leading causes of death in the EU. Standardised death rates for cancer, ischaemic heart disease and transport accidents followed a downward path between 2004 and 2014 Between 2004 and 2014, there was a 12.3 % reduction in EU-28 standardised death rates relating to cancer for men and a 6.9 % reduction for women — see Figures 1 and 2. Larger declines were recorded in relation to deaths from ischaemic heart disease, where death rates fell by 32.7 % for men and 36.8 % for women, while even greater reductions were recorded for deaths from transport accidents where rates fell by 45.7 % for men and 48.0 % for women. The standardised death rate for breast cancer fell by 11.7 % for women, which was in excess of the overall change for all cancers. By contrast, death rates for diseases of the nervous system increased for men by 19.7 % and for women by 26.9 %. Although the standardised death rate for lung cancer (including also cancer of the trachea and bronchus) increased for men and for women, the rate of change differed greatly: for men the rate increased by 16.9 % (with a downward trend since 200 Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s.

The Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death In The U.s.

Heart disease and cancer still top the list as the leading causes of death in the United States, but the gap is closing between the two. A new report out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at the shifting trends in Americans' health and mortality, and the conditions most likely to take lives. In 2014, a total of 2,626,418 deaths were reported in the United States, and the age-adjusted death rate decreased 1 percent to a record low. Bob Anderson, chief of the CDC's Mortality Statistics Branch, told CBS News the 15 leading causes of death in 2014 remained the same as in 2013. "We all have to die of something at some point. When you're looking at these categories you have to account for the fact that there are competing risks, but you can't avoid death," said Anderson. Why the list, then? "We want to create a society where we live as long as we can, as healthy as we can," he said. Crunching the data provides researchers with information that will help develop prevention programs, he explained. Anderson, who oversaw the production of the National Center for Health Statistics report, shared some insights into the top ten: 1. Heart disease While heart disease has topped the list for years now, the actual number of deaths and the death rate for heart disease has come down by quite a bit over recent decades, said Anderson. "The decline goes back about 50 years. For trends in heart disease, you see a substantial increase from the beginning of 20th century to 1950 or so, and then it starts to come down. It mirrors the rise and decline in smoking in the United States "What we've seen in last 20 or 30 years is rapid decline in heart disease. The decline has been fairly rapid and rapid enough so it's sort of overshadowed the aging of the population," said Ande Continue reading >>

Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death

Top 10 Leading Causes Of Death

Slide 1 of 21 While some might harbor fears of dying from a lightning strike or shark attack, the cause of your ultimate demise is likely to be much less conspicuous. Here are the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The data are based on deaths in 2013, the most recent year for which statistics are available. Rachael has been with Live Science since 2010. She has a masters degree in journalism from New York University's Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in molecular biology and a Master of Science in biology from the University of California, San Diego. Continue reading >>

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2016

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2016

Summary of Findings Causes of Death, Australia, 3303.0 focuses on the causes of the 158,504 deaths registered in 2016. This issue provides several articles on particular causes or topics (detailed below), as well as comprehensive data cubes covering all causes by key demographics Leading causes of death This article provides analysis on Australia's leading causes of death, including changes over time and differences for males and females. Information is also provided on the leading causes of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It also provides information on dementia and bowel cancer deaths. Drug Induced Deaths in Australia, 2016 This article explores the characteristics of drug induced deaths in Australia in 2016. It includes information on deaths associated with prescription medications and illicit substances, demographic issues, drug groupings and international comparability in relation to drug induced deaths. Understanding diabetes mortality in Australia Diabetes is Australia's seventh leading cause of death, accounting for 3% of all deaths in 2016. However, diabetes was mentioned as a contributory factor in 10.4% of all deaths. This article provides information on deaths with diabetes as an underlying cause as well as deaths which might be considered diabetes related. It also provides information on diabetes deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Islander peoples. Suicide deaths in Australia Two articles are provided covering key characteristics of deaths due to intentional self-harm (including age and sex) and suicide deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Continue reading >>

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