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Diabetes Carrying Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply And Travel Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply And Travel Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Travel Cases When you have diabetes, you know how painful it is to travel with the entire insulin supply; there are numerous things at once, and also they are fragile. So, in that situation, you need to have good quality insulin travel cases to support the whole package you are carrying. There are several different things like test strips, medications, glucose meter and other backup items. Hence, Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case. Insulin: Insulin is a hormone that is created by the beta cells in the pancreatic islets. It is responsible for regulating the proper metabolism of different components like Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats by helping the glucose in getting absorbed in the fat, muscles and liver cells from the blood. The glucose is further then converted into glycogen or fats, and when it is the liver tissues, it is converted into both the forms. The excessive production of glucose is controlled by the insulin present in the blood. The insulin circulation also has effects on the manufacture of proteins. Thus if the insulin levels go down in your blood, it has harsh effects on your whole body. Types of Insulin: There are various types of Insulin’s, but there are three main types of them: Fast-acting insulin: This insulin is very quickly absorbed into the blood from the fat tissues. This is also helpful when one wants to control or correct sugar levels in the blood while having meals or snack or even when one wants to correct high levels of sugar in the blood. Intermediate-acting Insulin: This insulin is absorbed slowly and very steadily in the blood and also lasts a lot longer than the other ones. This is mainly had between meals or to control blood sugar level Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day :: Insulin Carry

World Diabetes Day :: Insulin Carry

World Diabetes Day occurs annually on 14 November and is an opportunity to increase awareness of diabetes around the world through numerous campaigns, lectures, screenings and other events. However, for people with diabetes, managing the condition is a year-round, daily event – an event in which carry plays an important part. Those who need to inject insulin require a variety of items to be close at hand at any given part of the day. These can include items such as insulin pens, a blood glucose level meter, hypodermic needles, insulin cartridges or vials, alcohol/cleaning wipes, blister packs of medication tablets and glucose tablets, a diabetes ID card, as well as a diary and pen (for keeping easily accessible records of blood test results and eating habits) to name a few. However, finding a convenient means of carrying such items isn’t always simple, so we wanted to highlight some options that could go a long way to helping people manage diabetes more easily. We’ll be focusing on carry options for insulin supplies such as those above, rather than insulin pump pouches which hold insulin pumps that are attached to the body. Why good insulin carry is needed There are several reasons why it’s important to have good insulin carry. One of the primary reasons is the ability to keep insulin supplies in close proximity and organised. Insulin supplies need to be readily available whether you’re on the go or at home and having them all in an easily-accessible location makes life much simpler. There’s no wasting time finding them, plus it allows for greater flexibility of movement – you can get on with daily life without worrying that you don’t have everything you need with you. A good piece of insulin carry is also handy for keeping your supplies in one place for Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes should never hold you back from doing the things you love or from embarking on new adventures. However, when it comes to traveling, especially to destinations far off the beaten path, managing all the details of your diabetes care in addition to the details of travel – tickets, itineraries, connections, and reservations, to name a few – may seem overwhelming. You may be concerned about simply getting your supplies onto the airplane, not to mention time zone changes, new climates, or counting carbohydrates in the jungle or desert. Even a simple pleasure like sightseeing can feel difficult to manage with diabetes. However, with a little forethought and planning, many obstacles can be overcome. Here are some tips to help make your travels as stress-free as possible. Getting through the airport If you’re traveling by plane, you may encounter a few hassles at the airport, where upgraded security measures and baggage restrictions have become the norm, and flight changes or delays are always a possibility. Wearing a medical ID bracelet or necklace and showing it to security personnel is a good first step toward explaining why you are carrying medicines and diabetes supplies and is sometimes sufficient since more people are becoming knowledgeable about diabetes. A letter from your doctor that includes the date, your name, your diagnosis of diabetes, and a list of all the supplies (blood glucose meter, strips, lancets, etc.) and medicines you use can also smooth your way through security. If you use insulin, make sure that the type of insulin and dosage or pump, as well as the supplies you need for administering it, are listed as well. (This list might include an insulin pen and needles, syringes, or pump infusion sets.) Personally, I made such a list, had Continue reading >>

Manage Your Diabetes When Traveling

Manage Your Diabetes When Traveling

When you travel, diabetes comes along with you. By thinking ahead, you can manage your medications, meals, and the challenges of air travel. If you’re going on a long trip, have a medical checkup first. Tell your doctor about your travel plans and discuss any changes you may need to make in your diabetes care routine while away. Your doctor should provide specific advice on when to take prescription medications if you will be crossing multiple time zones, so bring your flight itinerary showing time zone differences. Otherwise, you could end up taking too much or too little of your medication. Packing Checklist Rule number one of traveling with diabetes is to pack wisely. Put everything you’ll need for diabetes care in a small bag. Then keep the bag with you at all times, whether you’re on a plane, train, or motor vehicle. Estimate how much medication and how many testing supplies and syringes you are likely to need. Then bring twice that amount, just in case something unexpected happens. Consider wearing a medical ID bracelet or necklace that identifies you as having diabetes, especially if you use insulin. Taking a Road Trip When you travel by car, bus or train, getting there is half the fun. Just be sure to follow these tips: Protect insulin from getting too hot by carrying it in a cooling pack. Don’t leave it in the vehicle, where it may overheat. Bring snacks and water with you, even if you plan to eat at roadside restaurants. You never know when you might have car trouble or a delay, and mealtimes may be unpredictable. Getting There by Air Air travel brings its own set of unique challenges and some simple solutions: Bring extra snacks in case of a flight change or delay. Be very careful using an insulin syringe in the air. In the pressurized cabin, the plun Continue reading >>

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

The day after I was released from the hospital after my diagnosis of being a Type 1 Diabetic, I looked over my syringes, vials, test strips, lancets, logbook and other such supplies and decided I needed some sort of carrying case. However, in being either vain or private, I wanted it to be discrete. Thankfully, this was before the age of smartphones, and toting around a day planner wasn’t all that uncommon. I wound up using my diagnosis as an excuse to buy a Palm Vx to eliminate the logbook and my paper sliding scale and then I picked up a day planner from Franklin Covey. I wound up emptying it of everything except the zip-lock pouch inside, and that’s where I stored my supplies. It had a nice little pocket inside for PDAs, which fit my Palm Vx nicely, and when it was obsolete, that’s where my glucometer and lancing device went. I had this day planner so long that it even got nicknames, it was known as “The Diabetes.” I’ve always been afraid of losing “The Diabetes.” It had its own place everywhere that I’ve lived, and the minute it is moved from that place, chaos and anarchy began to take over my life. 999 times out of 1000, “The Diabetes” just wound up getting pushed out of the way, relocated over to my computer desk, left in my laptop bag or scooped up by my loving wife and tucked away because she takes such good care of me. I remember scolding her a little bit and telling her that I loved how much she helped out but that one day I’d take it for granted and we’d both forget “The Diabetes” and we’d wind up somewhere and needing it, or worse, forgetting it somewhere. We tackled that challenge and it just became part of our routine, she grabbed it and packed it in her purse and then I asked her before we left to make sure she had it. Ever Continue reading >>

Learn About Lantus® (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Learn About Lantus® (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and pediatric patients (children 6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which coul Continue reading >>

Diabetes Supply Cases: Which Is Your Favorite?

Diabetes Supply Cases: Which Is Your Favorite?

What do you carry your diabetes supplies in? Let’s discuss my history with cases for a moment. I was diagnosed in 1992. And at that time, they admitted me to the hospital for a week so I could do inpatient “training” 3x a day to basically learn how to flip my life upside down and be diabetic. In a nutshell. But I digress. Then they sent me home with this beauty of a case. It was big enough to hold it all – my meter (One Touch – which was ginormous compared to my tiny Freestyle I use now), my insulin, a freezer pack, syringes, alcohol wipes, glucose tablets, and pretty much a spare of anything I needed. I used it for several years then gradually just started using the infamous black case. You know the one. The one that every meter comes in. So the only main difference is the size of said black case. The only thing you can really care in there is the meter, lancet device, and spare lancets. (Which those are pointless for most of us, considering we don’t change them, right? #likeyoudo) And I am terrible about not carrying insulin with me. I have what is in my pump reservoir, and my spare supply is almost always at home. When I was still on injections with syringes or pens, I just carried them loose in my purse. And I put the insulin vial in my black case with my meter. Not very secure or sanitary, though. But it’s what I did for years. And years. Last year I decided to try a Myabetic case. I had kept hearing about them and they are so stinkin’ cute. And I have a few friends that absolutely rave about theirs on Facebook and I wanted my own to love. I first bought this one at Target. It was super cute, but I ended up taking it back. It was bulky and I just didn’t like the layout of it. It wasn’t functional for my needs/preferences. (Everyone is different Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you don’t realize how much STUFF you have to always carry with you wherever you go. The items only multiple as time goes on and more treatment methods are added, etc. So where are you supposed to keep everything from your meter, to extra test strips, emergency medications and more? For women, you can opt to keep everything in your purse, but most often this can become disorganized and only creates additional frustration when you have to find everything in a pinch. In this guide we’re going to take a look at some of the best diabetes carrying cases on the market for those with all types of diabetes and of any age. If you haven’t found a case yet, then this guide can help start you on your journey of purchasing the right one. Or if it’s time to update your case, you may find one that suits your needs. I know with my kids with Type 1 diabetes, in the beginning I would have to purchase a new case every few months because of the wear and tear from carrying them virtually 24/7 no matter where we go. That was before I knew which were some of the best ones that not only provide you with somewhere to nicely keep all supplies organized but are durable enough to withstand frequent use. Here are some of my all-time favorites. 1. Medicool Dia-Pak The Medicool Dia-Pak allows you to conveniently keep all your supplies in one organized place. What’s nice about this diabetes carrying case is it comes with a freezable ice pack that allows you to keep your insulin or other supplies cool when traveling. Keeping everything together in one bag without bulkiness can be tricky, especially when it comes to making sure you have all the supplies you may need. The Medicool Dia-Pak folds up nicely to fit into a purse, travel bag, suitcase, or even ca Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes

For many people, traveling is one of the highlights of their lives. Whether you’re spending a weekend at a bed and breakfast or flying to an exotic location, diabetes doesn’t need to keep you from traveling or having an active lifestyle. With careful planning, you can manage your diabetes just as well as you do at home. Tips for traveling with diabetes Before you leave: Make an appointment with your health care provider at least 4 weeks before you go on any trip planned to last more than a few days to make sure your diabetes is well controlled. Be sure to ask for extra prescriptions in case you need to replace or get additional medicines while you're away Discuss with your health care provider how changes in your schedule, meals, and time zone could affect your blood sugar. Also ask whether you need to change how often you check your blood sugar Take along extra syringes, prescription pens, also known as prefilled pens, meter test strips and other supplies, as well as a good supply of snacks If you use a vial and syringe and travel often, you may want to ask your diabetes care team if a prefilled pen might be right for you Pack extra medicine and think about where you will store it. Check your patient information for storage instructions Wear your Medical ID at all times. The ID can provide critical information about your health. Be sure the information is written in the language of every country you'll be visiting Don't forget your emergency glucagon medicine, antidiarrheal medication, antibiotic ointment, anti-nausea drugs, blood and urine testing supplies, and extra batteries for your glucose meter While you travel: Keep a well-wrapped, air-tight snack pack with both rapid-acting and slow-acting carbs. Smart choices are packets of nuts, cheese and crackers, fruit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Carry Case Reviews From Diabetesmine

Diabetes Carry Case Reviews From Diabetesmine

One universal truth about living with diabetes is that you’ll need to carry around a lot of gear – a glucose meter with lancing device and test strips, medications, low-blood sugar treatments and more, with backups for everything when you travel. Women with diabetes often joke that their days of cute little party purses are over. And men with diabetes often complain that there aren’t enough options for male-friendly diabetes gear bags. If you take insulin, there’s also the issue of keeping that sensitive drug safe and temperature-controlled (cool enough not to overheat but also never freezing). What to do for tote bags and travel-case options? Over the years, DiabetesMine has looked at an array of carry bags and insulin coolers that help solve these issues (in alphabetical order): aDorn Designs - link to our video review aDorn makes a collection of fashionable handbags, clutch cases and even an over-the-shoulder messenger bag designed specifically to carry diabetes supplies. Special zipper compartments with mesh pockets and elastic grips make it easy to store glucose test strips, syringes, fast-acting glucose and more. In this review, we look at the Elite clutch case in bright patterns. BellaSoul - link to our written review Founded by the aunt of a type 1, Bella Soul has a line of both classy patent leather evening bags and embroidered shoulder bags that have built-in pockets for your diabetes supplies. Their mission? "To support diabetes management without compromising style and femininity." ChillMed Bags These are soft-sided “organizer bags” designed to be sturdier than competitors. They use industrial-quality zippers and a high thread count fabric that's heavier-gauge and extremely durable. ChillMED bags also compliment the popular FRIO Cooling Wallet (s Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetic Supply And Insulin Cases-ultimate Buyer’s Guide

Top 10 Diabetic Supply And Insulin Cases-ultimate Buyer’s Guide

Being a diabetic means that you should always be ready to deal with emergencies of your blood sugars levels going too high or too low. While it’s important that you know what do in such situations, it is also imperative that you are organized with your diabetes medical supplies. This will make it easier for you to reach your medication faster and prevent the condition from worsening. But without a special diabetic case supply organizer to store your diabetes medical supplies, you will have a rough time scrambling through your bag to find your diabetes supplies. Without a diabetes organizer, you are also more likely to be forgetful and increase the possibility of misplacing items. You are likely to forget refilling up essential equipment and medication. There will be many instances where you will be scrambling to reach your supplies. A diabetic supply case organizer will come in handy in such situations For non-insulin users, diabetic carrying cases will come in handy. These bags have specialized compartments where you can store your glucose meter case, lancing devices, medications and tests strips If you use insulin you will need an insulin pen carrying case or insulin travel case cooler to keep your insulin at a cool temperature. This particular aspect will narrow down your choices to diabetic kits that have packs of ice or have a cooling lining. Top 10 diabetic Travel supply case organizers and Insulin With so many brands offering diabetic case supply organizers in the market, it can be challenging to find the best diabetes organizer. To reduce your frustration, we have compiled a list of top 10 diabetes organizers. The Epipen case is a diabetic travel kit cooler designed to keep diabetics’ medication insulated and cool. You do not have to get stuck inside the hou Continue reading >>

Stylish Diabetes Supply Cases From Myabetic.com

Stylish Diabetes Supply Cases From Myabetic.com

Kyrra Richards, who has type 1 diabetes, has transformed her desire for a stylish diabetes carrying case into a thriving business. Her sense of style has struck a chord with a large audience, including a company that is working with her to customize her line to its pump. It’s been several years since Diabetes Health interviewed Kyrra at an AADE conference (I spoke to her recently to catch up and see how things were going. Nadia: Carrying cases often look like first aid kits, but yours do not. Has your educational background influenced your eye for design? Kyrra: I studied art in college, but I couldn’t have guessed that my UCLA arts background would be applied to medical accessories. But that’s part of the fun: applying creativity to otherwise dreary situations. Because I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the abnormally old age of 24, I was able to view my new lifestyle from a unique perspective. I used my love of color, design, and imagery to give diabetes management a fresh new look. Nadia: What motivated you to design a line of carrying cases for people with diabetes? Kyrra: I became depressed after my diagnosis. I felt as though I had lost my identity as an active, spirited young woman. I had been thrown into a clinical and regimented world and feared that I would be defined by a negative stigma. I would often “forget” to carry my diabetes supplies or hide my testing tools under the table to avoid attracting attention. I needed a change. My attitude was mentally and physically harmful. I had to find a way to accept my diagnosis and embrace diabetes as just a part of my life. I wanted my daily diabetes care to reflect my own individuality. I began designing fun, fashionable, and functional supply cases for my blood glucose meter, test strips, lancets, a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Supply Cases Worth Carrying

Diabetes Supply Cases Worth Carrying

Diabetes is rarely a glamorous condition, and that’s especially true when it comes to stashing and transporting all the high- and low-tech doodads we use to keep ourselves healthy. While most glucometers come with their own black vinyl zipper cases, you don’t have to be stuck with factory-issued fashion. Both men and women with diabetes have options than you may think. Go custom. In response to the black vinyl crisis, several small companies have begun making carriers that offer some more sophisticated options. Myabetic offers colorful cases that can easily pass for regular-people wallets and purses, while Diabete-ezy sells containers that could likely hold an entire endocrinologist’s office, and – as a result – are a little more utilitarian in appearance. Go cosmetic. Your local drugstore, department store or supermarket likely has an aisle full of cosmetic cases in dozens of different sizes and styles. Use a larger one when you want to carry everything from alcohol swabs to glucagon kits; smaller cases work when all you need is a testing kit and some glucose tabs. If you’re the kind of PWD who likes everything in its place, look for a cosmetics case with separate compartments – then put your lancing device where the lipstick’s supposed to go. Repurpose. In a pinch, random household vessels can be reinvented as diabetes supply holders. Coin purses, pencil cases and jewelry bags can usually do the job. An empty sunglasses case can easily hold a small glucometer and a few other bare necessities. Even a clean sock can help keep it all together if you’re desperate enough. Use what you like. Try searching Etsy for pouches, purses, wristlets and carriers – there’s no shortage of sophisticated vessels that zip, snap, fold and button. Keep an eye out at v Continue reading >>

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