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Diabetes Care Team

Diabetes: Team-based Care For Type 2 | The Community Guide

Diabetes: Team-based Care For Type 2 | The Community Guide

High-density level (HDL) cholesterol increased by a mean of 0.7mg/dL (9 studies) Low-density level (LDL) cholesterol decreased by a mean of 8.0mg/dL (14 studies) Total cholesterol level decreased by a mean 7.4mg/dL (12 studies) Triglycerides levels decreased by a mean of 13.3mg/dL (7 studies) Compared with usual care, team-based care increased the proportion of patients reaching target blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels. Target health outcomes are benchmarks that, when reached, show significant health benefits for the patient. The proportion of patients who reached an A1c level below 7.0% increased by a median of 15.1 percentage points (7 studies). The proportion of patients who reached an A1c level below 7.5% increased by a median of 18.0 percentage points (1 study). The proportion of patients who reached a blood pressure below 130/80mmHg increased by a median of 15.0 percentage points (10 studies). The proportion of patients who reached a systolic blood pressure below 130mmHg increased by a median of 4.4 percentage points (3 studies). The proportion of patients who reached a diastolic blood pressure below 80mmHg decreased by a median of 1.0 percentage point (3 studies). The proportion of patients who reached an HDL level above 35mg/dL decreased by a median of 3.2 percentage points (1 study). The proportion of patients who reached an HDL level above 40mg/dL increased by a median of 0.6 percentage points (1 study). The proportion of patients who reached above 43mg/dL for males or above 50mg/dL for females increased by a median of 2.0 percentage points (1 study). The proportion of patients who reached an LDL level below 130mg/dL increased by a median of 16.7 percentage points (5 studies). The proportion of patients who reached a total cholesterol level belo Continue reading >>

How To Build The Perfect Diabetes Care Team

How To Build The Perfect Diabetes Care Team

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 1 Comment When you have diabetes, it is imperative to have a group of people on your team who are constantly rooting for you and supporting you in every step of your journey. In this article, we will enumerate a list of the most important people to have as part of your perfect diabetes care team. Although your doctor or primary care provider is an important entity, he or she is not the most important part of your team. You, alone, are the most important member of your diabetes care team. Nobody else on your team can replace you, or make decisions for you. After all, it is your diabetes, and you have got to own it. By owning it, you can take the bull by the horns, and learn to live a long and healthy life, with minimizing future risks of complications that come with diabetes. However you like to think of it, the bottom line is that you are, and should be, the one in charge. Without you, all of the spokes of the wheel are useless. However, with you in charge, the people around you can support and enhance your care. While the rest of the members in your diabetes care team can steer you in the right direction, if you fall asleep at the helm, the ship is going to run into some rocky shores. Mirandas question to The Diabetes Council Miranda contacted us because she felt lost after receiving her diagnosis of diabetes. She wanted to find out how and where she needed to begin. Her primary care provider was already lined up, but she was wondering who else she should have around to help her navigate towards controlled and manageable diabetes. She had started reading about Type 2 diabetes , and the eventual impacts diabetes could have on many organ systems in her body. She wondered what kinds of professionals she should seek for who can help her Continue reading >>

You Are The Center Of Your Diabetes Care Team

You Are The Center Of Your Diabetes Care Team

You are the Center of Your Diabetes Care Team You are the Center of Your Diabetes Care Team You are the Center of Your Diabetes Care Team If you have diabetes, can you name the most important member of your diabetes care team? Hi, Im Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at NIH. The most important member of the team is you. You are the one who manages your diabetes every day, who makes decisions about your medicine, what to eat, and how to be active. Your diabetes care plan needs to work for you. Managing diabetes is a team effort, and you are at the center of that team. Your team requires the support of your health care professionals, as well as your family, friends and community. Take charge of your diabetes by sharing information and asking questions. Before your next appointment, write down a list of questions and bring it with you. You can also bring a loved one to help make sure you get your questions answered. For more information, follow us on Twitter @NIDDKgov . This is Dr. Griffin Rodgers with the NIH. Continue reading >>

Caring For Diabetes | Unitypoint Health - Meriter

Caring For Diabetes | Unitypoint Health - Meriter

Living with diabetes may be challenging, but you don't have to go it alone. UnityPoint Health Meriter is committed to helping you live well with diabetes by providing coordinated care through education, coaching and support. Our Diabetes Care Team is an interdisciplinary team of Meriter providers with specialized training in diabetes management. The team is made up of specialists within endocrinology, nutrition services, health psychology and diabetes education who will work with you to create a personalized treatment plan that integrates the medical, nutritional and behavioral aspects of diabetes care. Our mission is to help you understand how you can live well with diabetes, to provide you with day-to-day skills to manage your diabetes and to empower you to make healthy lifestyle changes to achieve optimal health. Naomi Wedel, MS, RD, CD, CDE, BC-ADM - Dietitian/Certified Diabetes Educator The Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs at theWest Washington Clinic, McKee Clinicand Middleton Clinic were awarded recognition for the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in 2010. These programs were added as a multi-site to the program at Meriter, currently serving the perinatal population. Our Endocrinologists are available upon referral from any treating medical provider and they see patients at the West Washington Clinic and Deforest-Windsor Clinic . The Diabetes Care Team offers group diabetes education classes taught by our interdisciplinary providers, individual appointments based upon your specific needs, insulin pump management and support, continuous glucose monitoring and diabetes follow-up services in the clinics and by telephone. Continue reading >>

Features Of Primary Health Care Teams Associated With Successful Quality Improvement Of Diabetes Care: A Qualitative Study

Features Of Primary Health Care Teams Associated With Successful Quality Improvement Of Diabetes Care: A Qualitative Study

Background. In quality improvement activities such as audit, some general practices succeed in improving care and some do not. With audit of care likely to be one of the major tools in clinical governance, it would be helpful to establish what features of primary health care teams are associated with successful audit in general practice. Objective. The aim of the present study was to identify those features of primary health care teams that were associated with successful quality improvement during systematic audit of diabetes care. Method. Semi-structured tape-recorded interviews were carried out with lead GPs and practice nurses in 18 general practices in Leicestershire that had the opportunity to improve their care and had completed two data collections in a multipractice audit of diabetes care. The interviewees were asked to describe their practice's approach to audit and the transcripts were coded for common features and judged for strength of feeling by blinded independent raters. Features common to practices that had, and those that had not, managed to improve diabetes care were identified. Results. Six features were identified reliably in the transcripts by blinded independent raters. Four were significantly associated with the successful improvement of care. Success was more likely in teams in which: the GP or nurse felt personally involved in the audit; they perceived their teamwork as good; they had recognized the need for systematic plans to address obstacles to quality improvement; and their teams had a positive attitude to continued monitoring of care. A positive attitude to audit and a personal interest in the disease were not associated with improvement in care. Conclusions. Success in improving diabetes care is associated with certain organizational fe Continue reading >>

Pediatric Endocrinology: Care Team

Pediatric Endocrinology: Care Team

Already a patient? Request an appointment with MyChart . Our care team can answer your questions about diabetes, weight related concerns, endocrinology and more. Pediatric endocrinologists are board-certified diabetes and endocrinology experts who help children and their families learn about the importance of physical activity, medication administration, healthy eating, blood glucose monitoring, diabetes care fundamentals, thyroid disease as well as disorders of growth, puberty, bone disease and adrenal disorders. Certified diabetes educators include nurses and nutrition specialists available to teach self-management skills to help you balance insulin, food and activity. Food records can be reviewed for caloric intake, nutritional adequacy and carbohydrate-counting education. Education also includes training for use of insulin pump and continuous glucose sensor technology as well as pattern management, sick day management and travel. We also help adjust insulin levels for exercise regimens and provide education about lipids, celiac disease and eating disorders. Nursing support staffschedule and facilitate growth hormone stimulation testing, injection and pen training, assist in navigating benefit coverage paperwork, and submit for coveragere-authorizationsand refills. Continue reading >>

Team Carethe Preferred Approach To Diabetes Treatment

Team Carethe Preferred Approach To Diabetes Treatment

Team CareThe Preferred Approach to Diabetes Treatment US Endocrinology, 2015;11(2):756 DOI: Diabetes requires the person living with the disease to make daily healthcare decisions. Research shows that a team approach is an effective way to help people better manage their diabetes. Teams that include a diabetes educator offer access to education, improved glycemic control, quality of life, and decreased risk for complications and healthcare costs. The provision of team care and self-management education offers a solution and can be a viable model in overcoming the barriers associated with the complexities of diabetes care. Keywords: Team care, diabetes education, improved outcomes Disclosure: Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, CDE, has no conflicts of interest to declare. No funding was received for the publication of this article. Open Access: This article is published under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, adaptation and reproduction provided the original author(s) and source are given appropriate credit. Received: July 22, 2015 Accepted September 28, 2015 Correspondence: Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, CDE, University of Pittsburgh Diabetes Institute, Falk Medical Building, Room 562, 3601 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, US.E: [email protected] Diabetes is a lifestyle disease that requires the person living with the disease to make many daily decisions about diet, activity level, and medications, as well as adequate support to manage the disease successfully. Research has shown that a team-based approach to diabetes care is an effective way to help people with diabetes manage the disease, prevent and treat complications, provide behavior-change strategies, and cope with the emotional challenges this chr Continue reading >>

Building An Effective Diabetes Care Team

Building An Effective Diabetes Care Team

No one can effectively manage diabetes alone, whether you have the disease or you're a physician caring for someone with it. "Its been known for years that diabetes requires a multidisciplinary team approach because there are so many components to its management," says Martin Abrahamson, M.D., Medical Director and Senior Vice President at Joslin Diabetes Center. This core team provides individualized care based on your needs, taking into account clinical guidelines developed at Joslin and other organizations. Your team meets regularly to review your progress. As someone with diabetes, you are the most important member of the team. You help set goals and members of your team provide the education and support necessary for you to achieve them. If youve just been diagnosed, your physician may refer you to Joslin just for education (individual appointments, group classes , or both). Or you can make an appointment directly with a Joslin physician. At your first appointment, you'll meet with both a physician and a certified diabetes educator. Meeting with these two experts is necessary because the medical and educational management of diabetes go hand in hand, points out Dr. Abrahamson. As the need arises, other specialists are brought onto the team: an ophthalmologist (eye care), nephrologist (kidney health), cardiologist (cardiovascular disease prevention), or podiatrist (foot care), for example. As the need arises, other specialists are brought onto the team: an ophthalmologist (eye care), nephrologist (kidney health), cardiologist (cardiovascular disease prevention), podiatrist (foot care) for example. A team effort keeps the score against diabetes in your favor. Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Health Care Team

Your Diabetes Health Care Team

en espaolEl equipo mdico para tu diabetes Managing your diabetes takes a team you, your parents, doctors, certified diabetes educators, dietitians, and mental health pros working together to get the job done. Your diabetes health care team will help develop a treatment plan that's made just for you. Also, the team can help you cope with some of the emotions and feelings that people with diabetes have to deal with. You'll probably meet one or more of these diabetes health care team members during your checkups: A pediatric endocrinologist (pronounced: en-duh-krih-NOL-eh-jist) is a doctor who specializes in caring for kids and teens with diseases of the endocrine system , such as diabetes and growth disorders . But pediatricians, family practitioners, and other medical doctors also treat people with diabetes. Doctors ask detailed questions about how you feel and do physical exams, which can include checking several parts of your body and taking your blood pressure. They also may check your diabetes records and your blood sugar level, and they may ask you for a urine (pee) sample. Your doctor can help teach you about diabetes and any other health problem you may have. After getting treatment suggestions from other diabetes health care team members as needed, your doctor will write down what you need to do to manage your diabetes in a treatment plan, or diabetes management plan. Think of your doctor as your diabetes team coach who develops a game plan for managing diabetes. Doctors also write prescriptions for insulin and other medicines and can refer you to other specialists as needed. Don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions, and make sure you understand the answers. If you're uncomfortable asking questions in front of your parents, ask to speak to your doctor alone. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Healthcare Team

Diabetes Healthcare Team

Tweet Depending on your own individual diabetes care needs, your healthcare team can vary considerably in size. This team will assist you in your diabetes management. At a very minimum your health team may just be your GP, however you should have access to a range of specialists as and when you need them. GP - general practitioner Your GP (general practitioner) is your first point of contact who will be kept updated of any changes in your care and is responsible for prescribing any medicines and supplies you need. Read more about your GP Consultant or diabetologist Depending on the set up at your medical centre, you may or may not have regular access to a consultant or diabetologist, however, you should have access to one if you have specialist questions that needs a consultant’s advice. Diabetes specialist nurse - DSN Diabetes specialist nurses, as the name suggests, are nurses with specialist knowledge of diabetes. Diabetes specialist nurses play a role in helping and supporting people with diabetes in managing their condition. Practice nurse Practice nurses play a key and varied role in medical centres. Practice nurses are trained to deal with a wide range of tasks from treating injuries to performing blood tests and vaccinations. Pharmacist Pharmacists receive specialist training in a wide variety of medical conditions, medications and treatments. If you have questions about your medication, such as side effects, your pharmacist can advise you. Optometrist and opthalmologist Optometrists and opthalmologists are both eye specialists and can help with your retinopathy screening and other eye conditions such as glaucoma and cataracts. The difference between the two is that an ophthalmologist is likely to have a deeper specialist knowledge and will be responsible for Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management

Type 1 diabetes in adults: diagnosis and management You will have a diabetes care team of people who are experts in diabetes (which may be called a 'multidisciplinary team'). It will include doctors, nurses and other professionals, such as people who can give you advice about your diet or about looking after your feet. You will generally see your care team at a diabetes clinic (usually at a hospital), but you may have some checks at other places. Your GP will also be involved in your care. Your diabetes care team will support you to manage your diabetes yourself. If you are worried about your diabetes or any of your symptoms, you should be able to get advice at any time. This could be from a member of your care team in person or by phone during the day. You should be given details of a 24hour helpline staffed by people who are experts in diabetes. Some treatments or care described in this information may not be suitable for you. If you think that your treatment does not match this advice, talk to your diabetes care team. Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care: Health Care Team & Care Plan | Cornerstones4care

Diabetes Care: Health Care Team & Care Plan | Cornerstones4care

Watch a video where Dr Javier Morales talks about the members of the diabetes care team and how you can be a big part of the teams success. Host Eileen Faxas and Dr Javier Morales identify the different members of the diabetes care team, and how you can be a big part of this teams success. Arlyn and her husband Claude discuss how they stay on the same page about managing her diabetes. Arlyn, whos been living with diabetes for many years, and husband Claude discuss how they stay on the same page about managing her diabetes. Communication is key, and these two almost have it down to a science. Prescription Tresiba is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes Tresiba is not for people with diabetic ketoacidosis Tresiba is available in 2 concentrations: 200 units/mL and 100 units/mL It is not known if Tresiba is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age Do not share your Tresiba FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. are allergic to Tresiba or any of the ingredients in Tresiba Before taking Tresiba, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provide Continue reading >>

Health Care Team

Health Care Team

Diabetes is best managed with the support of a diabetes healthcare team. The team approach will help you learn everything you need to know about diabetes, treatment and management. Many people can be part of your health care team to help you live well with diabetes. Your team can be made up of health professionals as well as your family and friends. But you are the most important member. You make the day-to-day decisions about your diabetes, and the more you know about diabetes, the easier this will be. The following are the kinds of people you may wish to have in your health care team. Talk to your doctor about what is right for you. When you are first diagnosed, your family doctor is the best doctor to see first. If you don’t have a family doctor then any general practitioner will be able to help you. Your doctor has a central role in assessing your diabetes and helping you manage it. They can refer you to any specialists that you may need to see. A Credentialled Diabetes Educator (CDE) will work with you to help you understand and manage your diabetes. They can provide a wide range of general information about diabetes and associated complications. Your doctor can refer you to a CDE in your area, or you can find a CDE on the Australian Diabetes Educators Association website, or your local hospital, diabetes centre and community health centres which are listed in the telephone directory, may have a CDE. A dietitian will work with you to develop a personalised healthy eating plan to suit your lifestyle, your type of diabetes and individual health needs. They can teach you how to read food labels, modify recipes and even how to order at restaurants. Contact the Dietitians Association of Australia on 1800 812 942, or contact your local hospital (not all hospitals have Continue reading >>

6+ People To Add To Your Diabetes Care Team

6+ People To Add To Your Diabetes Care Team

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Some of the content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but does suggest the general topic area. Additional content was created by or on behalf of the sponsor and was not reviewed by the Everyday Health editorial team. This content is labeled to show that the sponsor is the source (e.g. "Sponsored by" or "Provided by"). 6+ People to Add to Your Diabetes Care Team Managing diabetes requires a team effort that goes beyond your endocrinologist and diabetes educator. Add these people to your team and youll see why. Diabetes can affect nearly every part of your body and nearly every aspect of your life. That means you need a team approach to address every aspect of its maintenance and care. Having a team is very important, says Joseph Aloi, MD , professor and section chief of endocrinology and metabolism at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Whether the team includes a friend at work who knows your situation, somebody to exercise with, or someone to gently remind you to stay on track, its highly connected with success rate. At the core of your care team are likely your primary diabetes doctor, an endocrinologist, and a certified diabetes educator. The following people health professionals and non-professionals alike might also play an important role in your treatment success. Eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to successfully managing diabetes, and it goes beyond just cutting out sugar and carb Continue reading >>

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