diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Care Impact Factor 2014

Primary Care Diabetes

Primary Care Diabetes

Enter your login details below. If you do not already have an account you will need to register here . Check the status of your submitted manuscript in EES: Once production of your article has started, you can track the status of your article via Track Your Accepted Article. CiteScore: 1.65 CiteScore measures the average citations received per document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a given year (e.g. 2015) to documents published in three previous calendar years (e.g. 2012 14), divided by the number of documents in these three previous years (e.g. 2012 14). The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years. 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2018) 5-Year Impact Factor: 1.583 Five-Year Impact Factor: To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2016 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years. 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2018) Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 0.856 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 0.584 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journals impact. Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Scientific Journals Lead In Performance Rankings

American Diabetes Association Scientific Journals Lead In Performance Rankings

American Diabetes Association Scientific Journals Lead in Performance Rankings Diabetes and Diabetes Care, the flagship research publications of the American Diabetes Association, remain the highest-ranked journals devoted exclusively to diabetes research and treatment. Based on Thomson Reuters recently released 2008 Journal Citation Reports, Diabetes continues to lead the way among publications devoted to original diabetes research, with an Impact Factor of 8.4. Diabetes Care has an Impact Factor of 7.4 and is the highest-ranked journal with a focus on diabetes treatment and care. Impact Factor is a measure of how often work published in a peer-reviewed journal is cited by other researchers. The statistic is considered a measure of a journals prestige and influence. One only has to look at the clinical research data regarding patients with diabetes and heart disease that have been released over the past year to realize how fast things are changing in the clinical care of individuals with diabetes, said William Cefalu, MD, Associate Editor for Diabetes and former Associate Editor for Diabetes Care. As a provider, the American Diabetes Associations journals are considered the standard in providing the latest information to keep me up to date on current practice guidelines for treating patients with diabetes. As a researcher, they provide the latest in ground-breaking research not only in my area of interest, but in all research areas related to diabetes. Diabetes and Diabetes Care also lead diabetes research publications in Eigenfactor, a measure of the overall value provided by articles in a given journal, and Article Influence Score, a measure of a journal's prominence based on per-article citations. Combined, the journals receive more than 40,000 total citations per Continue reading >>

Using Data To Improve Diabetes Care

Using Data To Improve Diabetes Care

Large population data analysis provides useful clinical feedback to healthcare providers and national organisations, which aids the wider communication and understanding about changing healthcare demographics. A focus on risk-factor profiling enables early preventive care strategies, reducing subsequent complications and costly hospital admissions. Diabetes in the UK What is the Problem? In 2008, a report by Diabetes UK 1 estimated that diabetes accounted for around 10% of NHS expenditure, equating to 9 billion per year, or 1 million every hour. This was double a 2001 estimate ( Department of Health, 2001 )2, showing the impact of a rising prevalence across the UK. A subsequent report in Diabetic Medicine3 predicts NHS annual spending on diabetes will increase from 9.8 to 16.9 billion over the next 25 years, reaching 17% of the entire NHS budget. The prevalent national diabetes population of Scotland has increased from 103,835 (2%) in 2002 to 258,570 in 2012, representing 5% of the Scottish population ( Scottish Diabetes Survey )4. This epidemic of diabetes in the UK is mirrored around the world as a result of rising obesity rates and increasing longevity. Many countries with rapidly emerging economies such as China, South East Asia, South America and Africa will see the most dramatic rises in diabetes rates over the next few decades, as wealth generation leads to adoption of more sedentary behaviour and poorer, high-fat, Western-style diets. In many Middle Eastern countries, around 1 in 5 of the population already has diabetes (see later example ). Scotland Diabetes Policy and Care Standards Aspiring to Better Care The Scottish Diabetes Action Plan 5 suggests that Diabetes has been recognised for at least 10 years as an exemplar long-term condition, both in terms of t Continue reading >>

Current Diabetes Reports

Current Diabetes Reports

Description Current Diabetes Reports provides in-depth review articles contributed by international experts on the most significant developments in the field. By presenting clear, insightful, balanced reviews that emphasize recently published papers of major importance, the journal elucidates current and emerging approaches to the diagnosis, treatment, management, and prevention of diabetes. Browse Volumes & Issues Continue reading >>

Diabetes Research And Clinical Practice

Diabetes Research And Clinical Practice

Enter your login details below. If you do not already have an account you will need to register here . Due to migration of article submission systems, please check the status of your submitted manuscript in the relevant system below: Check the status of your submitted manuscript in EVISE Check the status of your submitted manuscript in EES: Once production of your article has started, you can track the status of your article via Track Your Accepted Article. CiteScore: 3.52 CiteScore measures the average citations received per document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a given year (e.g. 2015) to documents published in three previous calendar years (e.g. 2012 14), divided by the number of documents in these three previous years (e.g. 2012 14). The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years. 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2018) 5-Year Impact Factor: 3.308 Five-Year Impact Factor: To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2016 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years. 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2018) Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.445 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.538 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journals impact. Continue reading >>

Practice Facilitation To Improve Diabetes Care In Primary Care: A Report From The Epic Randomized Clinical Trial

Practice Facilitation To Improve Diabetes Care In Primary Care: A Report From The Epic Randomized Clinical Trial

Practice Facilitation to Improve Diabetes Care in Primary Care: A Report From the EPIC Randomized Clinical Trial 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 2Clinical Research Strategies, Denver, Colorado 3Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 4Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: W. Perry Dickinson, MD, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, 12631 E 17th Ave, Mail Stop F496, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, perry.dickinson{at}ucdenver.edu PURPOSE We investigated 3 approaches for implementing the Chronic Care Model to improve diabetes care: (1) practice facilitation over 6 months using a reflective adaptive process (RAP) approach; (2) practice facilitation for up to 18 months using a continuous quality improvement (CQI) approach; and (3) providing self-directed (SD) practices with model information and resources, without facilitation. METHODS We conducted a cluster-randomized trial, called Enhancing Practice, Improving Care (EPIC), that compared these approaches among 40 small to midsized primary care practices. At baseline and 9 months and 18 months after enrollment, we assessed practice diabetes quality measures from chart audits and Practice Culture Assessment scores from clinician and staff surveys. RESULTS Although measures of the quality of diabetes care improved in all 3 groups (all P <.05), improvement was greater in CQI practices compared with both SD practices (P <.0001) and RAP practices (P <.0001); additionally, improvement was greater in SD practices compared with RAP practices (P <.05). In RAP practices, C Continue reading >>

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Care: Effecting Behavioral Change In Patients

Psychological Aspects Of Diabetes Care: Effecting Behavioral Change In Patients

Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients Number of Hits and Downloads for This Article Dec 15, 2014 (publication date) through Jun 8, 2018 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 7901 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 501, Pleasanton, CA 94588, USA Copyright 2014 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. World J Diabetes.Dec 15, 2014;5(6): 796-808 Published online Dec 15, 2014.doi: 10.4239/wjd.v5.i6.796 Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients Boon-How Chew, Sazlina Shariff-Ghazali, Aaron Fernandez Boon-How Chew, Sazlina Shariff-Ghazali, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Aaron Fernandez, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Author contributions: Chew BH, Shariff-Ghazali S and Fernandez A contributed to this paper. Correspondence to: Boon-How Chew, MD, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patients adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare Continue reading >>

Status Of Diabetes Care: New Challenges, New Concepts, New Measuresfocusing On The Future!

Status Of Diabetes Care: New Challenges, New Concepts, New Measuresfocusing On The Future!

Status of Diabetes Care: New Challenges, New Concepts, New MeasuresFocusing on the Future! 5Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 8ASH Comprehensive Hypertension Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL 12Ochsner Diabetes Clinical Research Unit, Frank Riddick Diabetes Institute, Department of Endocrinology, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA 1Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 2Manchester Diabetes Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, U.K. 3Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 4ISLHD, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia 5Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 6Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 7Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 8ASH Comprehensive Hypertension Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL 9Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10Dallas Diabetes and Endocrine Center at Medical City, Dallas, TX 11Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 12Ochsner Diabetes Clinical Research Unit, Frank Riddick Diabetes Institute, Department of Endocrinology, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA 13Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 14Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 15VA San Diego Healthcare Syst Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care | Rg Impact & Description | Impact Rankings ( 2017 And 2018 )

Diabetes Care | Rg Impact & Description | Impact Rankings ( 2017 And 2018 )

Objective: To examine the effect of different feeding routes on appetite and metabolic responses after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).Research design and methods: A standard liquid meal was administered either orally, into the gastric remnant, or intraduodenally 6 months after RYGB. Changes in plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), peptide-YY (PYY), and appetite were measured pre- and postprandially.Results: Postprandial GLP-1 and PYY responses were similar, whereas glucose, insulin, and GIP levels differed markedly after oral versus intraduodenal feeding. Intraduodenal feeding prompted an intermediate appetite response (i.e., between oral and intragastric). For postprandial glucose, insulin, and GIP levels, the intraduodenal route was more similar to the intragastric than oral route. Intragastric administration did not evoke changes in appetite, glucose, or insulin; however, it slightly increased GLP-1 and PYY and moderately increased GIP.Conclusions: Appetite and metabolic responses after RYGB depend on the route by which nutrients enter the gastrointestinal tract. Objective: Diabetes is associated with high risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, particularly in patients with dyslipidemia and diabetic complications. We investigated the incidence of CV events with intensive or standard lipid-lowering therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia, diabetic retinopathy, and no history of coronary artery disease (treat-to-target approach).Research design and methods: In this multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point study, eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to intensive statin therapy targeting LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) <70 mg/dL (n= 2,518) or standard statin therapy targ Continue reading >>

Quality Of Diabetes Care In Germany Improved From 2000 To 2007 To 2014, But Improvements Diminished Since 2007. Evidence From The Population-based Kora Studies

Quality Of Diabetes Care In Germany Improved From 2000 To 2007 To 2014, But Improvements Diminished Since 2007. Evidence From The Population-based Kora Studies

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Quality of Diabetes Care in Germany Improved from 2000 to 2007 to 2014, but Improvements Diminished since 2007. Evidence from the Population-Based KORA Studies * E-mail: [email protected] Affiliations Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, Neuherberg, Germany, German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Mnchen-Neuherberg, Germany Affiliations Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, Neuherberg, Germany, Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometrics and Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians- Universitt Mnchen, Munich, Germany Affiliation Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, Neuherberg, Germany Affiliations German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Mnchen-Neuherberg, Germany, Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, Neuherberg, Germany Affiliations German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Mnchen-Neuherberg, Germany, Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, Neuherberg, Germany Continue reading >>

Jmir-role Of Social Media In Diabetes Management In The Middle East Region: Systematic Review | Alanzi | Journal Of Medical Internet Research

Jmir-role Of Social Media In Diabetes Management In The Middle East Region: Systematic Review | Alanzi | Journal Of Medical Internet Research

The Karma system is currently undergoing maintenance (Monday, January 29, 2018). The maintenance period has been extended to 8PM EST. Karma Credits will not be available for redeeming during maintenance. Preprints (earlier versions) of this paper are available at , first published Oct 16, 2017. This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue: Department of Health Information Management and Technology, College of Public Health, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia Department of Health Information Management and Technology Background: Diabetes is a major health care burden in the Middle East region. Social networking tools can contribute to the management of diabetes with improved educational and care outcomes using these popular tools in the region. Objective: The objective of this review was to evaluate the impact of social networking interventions on the improvement of diabetes management and health outcomes in patients with diabetes in the Middle East. Methods: Peer-reviewed articles from PubMed (1990-2017) and Google Scholar (1990-2017) were identified using various combinations of predefined terms and search criteria. The main inclusion criterion consisted of the use of social networking apps on mobile phones as the primary intervention. Outcomes were grouped according to study design, type of diabetes, category of technological intervention, location, and sample size. Results: This review included 5 articles evaluating the use of social media tools in the management of diabetes in the Middle East. In most studies, the acceptance rate for the use of social networking to optimize the management of diabetes was relatively high. Diabetes-specific management tools such as the Saudi Arabia Networking for Aiding Diabetes and Diabetes Intel Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care | Rg Impact Rankings (2017 And 2018)

Diabetes Care | Rg Impact Rankings (2017 And 2018)

Objective: Health care spending on diabetes in the U.S. has increased dramatically over the past several decades. This research describes health care spending on diabetes to quantify how that spending has changed from 1996 to 2013 and to determine what drivers are increasing spending.Research design and methods: Spending estimates were extracted from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation's Disease Expenditure 2013 database. Estimates were produced for each year from 1996 to 2013 for each of 38 age and sex groups and six types of care. Data on disease burden were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease 2016 study. We analyzed the drivers of spending by measuring the impact of population growth and aging and changes in diabetes prevalence, service utilization, and spending per encounter.Results: Spending on diabetes in the U.S. increased from $37 billion (95% uncertainty interval $32-$42 billion) in 1996 to $101 billion ($97-$107 billion) in 2013. The greatest amount of health care spending on diabetes in 2013 occurred in prescribed retail pharmaceuticals (57.6% [53.8-62.1%] of spending growth) followed by ambulatory care (23.5% [21.7-25.7%]). Between 1996 and 2013, pharmaceutical spending increased by 327.0% (222.9-456.6%). This increase can be attributed to changes in demography, increased disease prevalence, increased service utilization, and, especially, increases in spending per encounter, which increased pharmaceutical spending by 144.0% (87.3-197.3%) between 1996 and 2013.Conclusions: Health care spending on diabetes in the U.S. has increased, and spending per encounter has been the biggest driver. This information can help policymakers who are attempting to control future spending on diabetes. Objective: Lesbian and bisexual (LB) women are more like Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

ISSN: 1520-9156 | Online ISSN: 1557-8593 | Published Monthly | Current Volume: 20 *2016 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2017) The only peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of diagnosing and managing diabetes with cutting-edge devices, drugs, drug delivery systems, and software. Search Subscribe/Renew Recommend This Title Sign Up for TOC Alerts Submit a Paper Share with a Colleague Diabetes Technology& Therapeutics is the only peer-reviewed journal providing healthcare professionals with information on new devices, drugs, drug delivery systems, and software for managing patients with diabetes. This leading international journal delivers practical information and comprehensive coverage of cutting-edge technologies and therapeutics in the field, and each issue highlights new pharmacological and device developments to optimize patient care. Diabetes Technology& Therapeutics coverage includes: Detection and prevention of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications Breakthrough technologies and new therapeutic drug classes Behavioral aspects and approaches to diabetes care The latest advancement and applications of new and emerging technologies, including: Continue reading >>

Quality Of Care For Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Model Practices In Slovenia First Results

Quality Of Care For Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Model Practices In Slovenia First Results

Quality of care for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in model practices in Slovenia first results Quality of care for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in model practices in Slovenia first results KAKOVOST OSKRBE BOLNIKOV S SLADKORNO BOLEZNIJO TIPA 2 V REFERENNIH AMBULANTAH - PRVI REZULTATI Community Medical Center Maribor, Ulica talcev 9, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia Published Online: 2016-05-10 | DOI: A new organisation at the primary level, called model practices, introduces a 0.5 full-time equivalent nurse practitioner as a regular member of the team. Nurse practitioners are in charge of registers of chronic patients, and implement an active approach into medical care. Selected quality indicators define the quality of management. The majority of studies confirm the effectiveness of the extended team in the quality of care, which is similar or improved when compared to care performed by the physician alone. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of management of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 before and after the introduction of model practices. A cohort retrospective study was based on medical records from three practices. Process quality indicators, such as regularity of HbA1c measurement, blood pressure measurement, foot exam, referral to eye exam, performance of yearly laboratory tests and HbA1c level before and after the introduction of model practices were compared. The final sample consisted of 132 patients, whose diabetes care was exclusively performed at the primary care level. The process of care has significantly improved after the delivery of model practices. The most outstanding is the increase of foot exam and HbA1c testing. We could not prove better glycaemic control (p>0.1). Nevertheless, the proposed benchmark for the suggested Continue reading >>

A Cascade Of Care For Diabetes In The United States: Visualizing The Gaps

A Cascade Of Care For Diabetes In The United States: Visualizing The Gaps

Article, Author, and Disclosure Information Author, Article, and Disclosure Information From the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Disclosures: Authors have disclosed no conflicts of interest. Forms can be viewed at www.acponline.org/authors/icmje/ConflictOfInterestForms.do?msNum=M14-0019 . Reproducible Research Statement:Study protocol: Protocols for NHANES are freely available with unrestricted access at www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm . Statistical code: Available from Dr. Bullard (e-mail, [email protected] ). Data set: Freely available with unrestricted access at www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/nhanes_questionnaires.htm . Requests for Single Reprints: Mohammed K. Ali, MBChB, MSc, MBA, Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341; e-mail, [email protected] . Current Author Addresses: Drs. Ali and del Rio: Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Claudia Nance Rollins Building, Atlanta, GA 30322. Drs. Bullard and Gregg: Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341. Author Contributions: Conception and design: M.K. Ali, K.M. Bullard, E.W. Gregg, C. del Rio. An Continue reading >>

More in diabetes