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Diabetes Care Checklist

Aade7 Self-care Behaviors

Aade7 Self-care Behaviors

Being active not just about losing weight. It has many health benefits like lowering cholesterol, improving blood pressure, lowering stress and anxiety, and improving your mood. If you have diabetes, physical activity can also help keep your blood sugar levels to normal and help you keep your diabetes in control. Checking your blood sugar levels regularly gives you vital information about your diabetes management. Monitoring helps you know when your blood sugar levels are on target and it helps you make food and activity adjustments so that your body can perform at its best. There are several types of medications that are often recommended for people with diabetes. Insulin, pills that lower your blood sugar, aspirin, blood pressure medication, cholesterol-lowering medication, or a number of others may work together to lower your blood sugar levels, reduce your risk of complications and help you feel better. Everyone encounters problems with their diabetes control; you can't plan for every situation you may face. However, there are some problem-solving skills that can help you prepare for the unexpected -- and make a plan for dealing with similar problems in the future. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Checklist

Diabetes Checklist

If you have diabetes, follow these action steps for treatment. The possible complications from diabetes can be extremely serious and cause damage to vital organs. Many of these complications can be delayed or prevented by carefully controlling blood glucose, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol levels. To help you manage your diabetes you should discuss, create and follow a diabetes management plan with your healthcare provider and set goals for a treatment plan. Here are some specific suggestions to follow: those action steps you need to do to take charge of your diabetes: Ask your healthcare provider about the ABCs of diabetes. "A" is for AIC, a measure of average blood glucose; "B" is blood pressure; and "C" is LDL-cholesteral. You should find out what your levels are, what they should be, and what steps you can take to reach these goals. Work with your healthcare provider to establish and maintain individualized target blood glucose levels. Ask how often and when to measure your blood glucose levels. Ask how often and when to measure blood glucose levels. You should keep a record of blood glucose readings to show your healthcare provider so he/she can better assist you in regulating your blood glucose. Seek the help of qualified healthcare professionals - such as a primary care provider, an endocrinologist, a certified diabetes educator or a registered dietitian - to help with diabetes management. Be aware of the symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). If you experience these symptoms, you should adjust your treatment plan and seek advice from your healthcare provider on how to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Know the symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) Feel weak, confused, irritable, hungry or tired Get blood l Continue reading >>

Summary Of Guidelines For Patients With Diabetes: Checklist For Your Doctor Visits

Summary Of Guidelines For Patients With Diabetes: Checklist For Your Doctor Visits

Every person with diabetes should visit a doctor at least every three months. Regular checkups allow your doctor to track your condition and, if necessary, make changes in your treatment plan. But what should happen during those checkups? Do you wonder why your doctor orders certain tests? Or what the numbers mean? The American Diabetes Associations guidelines cover all aspects of diabetes care, including doctors' visits. This summary of the ADA's recommendations will help you know what to expect from your next visit. If you still wonder why your doctor has ordered a test -- or not ordered a test -- be sure to ask the doctor directly. When tests should be done The ADA has different guidelines for what should happen on diagnosis, at each visit, every three months, and once a year. 1. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor should provide a pneumococcal vaccine for protection against pneumonia, unless you have already been vaccinated. This vaccination does not have to be renewed each year. When you turn 65, however, you should receive another vaccine if you haven't had one in the last five years. 2. At each visit, a doctor should do the following: Ask about your self-monitoring of blood sugar. Ask about frequency and severity of episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Check your weight. Measure your blood pressure. Carefully inspect your legs and feet (including between the toes) for sores. Ask about your medication use. Answer questions about the disease and educate you about self-care. Check on any diabetic complications, including symptoms of nerve damage such as numbness. Ask about your use of tobacco and/or alcohol. Ask you about any lifestyle changes and discuss the consequences. Talk to you about possible stress, de Continue reading >>

Your Bestdays Diabetes Checklist :: Diabetes Monitoring & Management :: Onetouch

Your Bestdays Diabetes Checklist :: Diabetes Monitoring & Management :: Onetouch

1 The Meter Remote must not be exposed to water 1 Data on file. "OneTouch Ultra System Accuracy (2001 2009)", LifeScan Inc., 2010 1. Before you begin testing on your forearm or palm, read the User Guide and talk to your healthcare professional. To obtain the OneTouch AST Clear Cap, please call the OneTouch Customer Care line at 1 800 663-5521. 1. Before you begin testing on your forearm or palm, read the user guide and talk to your healthcare professional. To obtain the OneTouch UltraClear Cap, please call the OneTouch Customer Care line at 1 800 663-5521. *Allows for a less painful stick when used with the OneTouch UltraSoft Lancet. LifeScan Canada, 2017. All rights reserved. Trademarks are used under license by LifeScan Canada. The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners. LifeScan Canada, 2017. All rights reserved. Trademarks are used under license by LifeScan Canada. The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners. The Bluetooth word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, and any use of such marks by LifeScan Scotland Ltd. is under license. Apple, the Apple logo, iPhone, iPad and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc. Other trademarks and trade names are those of their respective owners. This site was last updated on March 23, 2018. This site is published by LifeScan Canada, a division of Johnson & Johnson Inc. which is solely responsible for its contents. It is intended for visitors from Canada. By using this site, you agree to our Legal Notice and Privacy Policy. Contact us at [email protected] or 1 800 663-5521. Web Site Que Continue reading >>

Checklist: 15 To-dos Before You Move

Checklist: 15 To-dos Before You Move

Click here for a printable moving checklist of your own. If youre preparing for a move, youll no doubt create a to-do list before the movers arrive and once you step foot inside your new home. To help you tend to your diabetes care throughout the big move, weve created this easy-to-follow, tear-out checklist: __ Talk to your diabetes care team about your move. __ Ask for referrals to health care providers in your new location. __ Call the local American Diabetes Association office in your new area, or find a local diabetes support group, for information on health care providers as well as the emotional support you may need. __ Parents, start gathering the information youll need for your childs Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP) and 504 plan to be used at her or his new school. If you are moving to a new state, research state laws that affect school diabetes care. __ If your insurance is changing, contact your new insurer to learn about your coverage. __ Set up appointments with new health care providers. Note that in some doctors offices, appointments may not be available for several months. __ Ask your current health care providers for prescription renewals, as well as copies of all of your health records. Also ask them to send your records to your new providers. __ If you use insulin, consider how you will keep it cold during travel. __ Parents should contact their childs new school and schedule meetings with the school nurse, teachers, and 504 plan coordinator. __ Put together a stockpile of suppliesblood glucose meter, lancing device, lancets, test strips, medication, pump supplies, and fast-acting glucoseto have on you while traveling. __ Gather snacks, and make sure you have enough water for the trip. __ If you are moving to a place where English is not comm Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Checklist

Your Diabetes Checklist

From contact information on your medical care team to diabetes supply orders to your blood glucose readings, careful record-keeping and research should be high priorities for people with diabetes. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Having diabetes means more than just taking medication and checking your blood sugar level. The person with diabetes faces a number of issues, from finding a care team to record-keeping and paying the bills. Depending on your overall health and any diabetes complications , your diabetes care team may include: Primary care provider. This is the doctor you see for general checkups. This doctor may refer you to a diabetes specialist, known as an endocrinologist. If not, seek out a primary care doctor who specializes in diabetes. To be sure that you have a care provider with deep experience in diabetes, ask if the doctor has special training in diabetes, how many diabetes patients she treats, and if she has a good list of other health care professionals youll need who specialize in diabetes care. Diabetes nurse educator. Typically a registered nurse with special training in diabetes care, the nurse educator can teach you about a wide variety of issues related to diabetes management, including how to take your medicine, how to check and track your blood glucose , what to do in an emergency, and much more. Registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator. A dietitian who is experienced in diabetes will help you map out an eating plan to stay healthy by keeping your blood sugar levels under control. The dietitian can also teach you strategies for eating out, what to eat when you're sick, and how to balance your med Continue reading >>

Checklist For Diabetes Self-management

Checklist For Diabetes Self-management

Part of Diabetes For Dummies Cheat Sheet (Australian Edition) Managing diabetes requires good self-discipline and regular visits to your doctor or diabetes care team. Following is a checklist for your diabetes care what you or your doctor should be checking on a daily, every threefour monthly or annual basis. Picking up complications early is key to managing your diabetes. The earlier you or your doctor realise a health problem exists, the earlier that problem can be addressed and managed. Some of the investigations included in the following list are required more frequently if being actively treated. Blood glucose self-monitoring, at the following frequencies: Before meals and bedtime for person with type 1 diabetes Before breakfast and at least one to two additional times through the day, preferably two hours after meals for person with type 2 diabetes on tablets. Once daily for person with stable type 2 diabetes Before and one hour after meals for pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes Maintenance of healthy eating and exercise plan Continue reading >>

Adolescent Transition

Adolescent Transition

Our transition bulletin -- Diabetes Transition Care News -- is now available for viewing/downloading. Look for bulletins on a quarterly basis (January, April, July, and October). On January 19, 2015, Natalie Sullivan, joined the staff of the DCPNS for a 2-year term (0.5 FTE) as the Transition Project Coordinator. This position will help to improve rates of successful transition from pediatric to adult care/services. Efforts will focus on implementation and evaluation of theMoving On With Diabeteshealth care provider processes and resources (see below) as well initiatives aimed at transitioning youth. The aim of Natalies position is to help build capacity in diabetes care providers to improve transition processes and experiences for transitioning youth/young adults living with diabetes. Some ways in which this will be accomplished is by: Working closely with specialty diabetes teams and physicians Planning local events aimed at prepared, planned, and informed transition Facilitating linkage to teams/specialists/community resources for specific individuals/families Gathering information from transitioning youth/young adults on their transition experiences and working to address challenges and build on successes. An advisory group has been formed with representation from across the province to offer advice to the DCPNS/Transition Project Coordinator and to provide a forum for consultation, discussion, and recommendations throughout the project. This group met monthly initially to guide and develop and processes and necessary tools. Meetings are now being held quarterly. Natalie is now accepting referrals to assist specific youth/young adults through the transition process. The following materials help to explain her role and the referral process. The referral and consent Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Checklist

Your Diabetes Checklist

Your ABC checklist of diabetes: A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Here are the things that anyone with diabetes should have tested, checked, or measured regularly in order to monitor and manage their condition successfully. Track your blood glucose level over time with the A1C test. A simple blood glucose test, called A1C, can regularly estimate your average blood glucose (eAG) levels over a period of two to three months. It does this by measuring how much glucose gets attached to your red blood cells. Because new red blood cells are always being made to replace older ones, your A1C will change over time, too. Have your doctor measure your A1C at least twice per year. Get tested more often if youre changing diabetes care or medications. The general healthy target for A1C is 7% (eAG of 154 mg/dl). Studies show that for every one point decrease in A1C, you reduce your risk of long-term diabetes complications by up to 40%. Check your blood glucose with a meter, as directed/ordered/prescribed by your physician, even if you get your A1C test periodically. If youve been diagnosed with diabetes, your blood glucose level can go lower or higher. Use your blood glucose (sugar) levels to make decisions about food and activities each daydecisions that can prevent diabetes complications such as heart attack, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation. Too much food (like a meal or snack with more carbohydrates than normal) Continue reading >>

Assessment Of The Patient With Established Diabetes

Assessment Of The Patient With Established Diabetes

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Diabetes Education and Self-management Programmes article. When, how and who? Patients with diabetes frequently attend their healthcare practitioners, either specifically for diabetes-related issues, for complications of their chronic illness, or for unrelated problems. They may see their GP, practice nurse, hospital diabetologist, diabetes specialist nurse, dietician and many others, from time to time. Each visit can be viewed as an opportunity to assess and improve the patient's understanding of their illness, and their ability to control the disease. This article provides a summary of the areas of assessment relevant to type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, which will need to be adapted, depending on an individual patient's type of diabetes. Aims of assessing the patient with diabetes To educate the patient and enable them to monitor and manage their diabetes as well as possible. To assess any problems in glycaemic control and address them to improve it. To detect any complications of diabetes and treat them as appropriate. To educate and reinforce healthy lifestyle advice. To assess the patient's overall health and to treat any associated or coincidental illness, physical or mental. To provide support and advice to the patient on how to cope with living with a chronic illness and how they can best alter their lifestyle to maintain their health. A checklist for a routine, annual or opportunistic review of the patient with diabetes History There is much to cover Continue reading >>

Diabetes Caregiver's Daily Care Checklist

Diabetes Caregiver's Daily Care Checklist

Helping someone take care of her diabetes doesn't just make her feel better. It helps her avoid common diet, foot, and mouth problems. Use this checklist for top-notch daily care. Most people with diabetes already have their own daily routines. Some dont need any help at all -- some need reminders and prompts. But if youre a new caregiver or family member, these are good things for you to know. She is in charge of keeping her blood sugar levels healthy. She might already be keeping a daily record of her blood glucose readings, medicine schedule, exercise , meals, and how she feels. She might be working with her doctor to look for patterns from month to month and let her doctor know about them. When she wants to exercise , note that she should wait an hour or so after eating, when blood sugar is likely higher. Its always a good idea to pack glucose tablets or a carbohydrate snack, plenty of water, and a diabetes ID tag or card when she exercises away from home. She should also check her blood glucose before, during, and after exercise. Stress can affect her blood sugar. Some daily activities that might help her ease stress: walking, deep breathing exercises, gardening, meditation , listening to music, or working on a hobby. If she has problems being able to do any of these things herself -- from monitoring blood sugar to taking medications -- you might be able to help. People with diabetes are more likely to have problems in their mouths -- like gum disease , fungus, and dry mouth . That's why mouth care is so important. They should brush with a soft-bristled brush after every meal, and floss at least once a day. Ingrown toenails can lead to infection and other problems. Caregivers or family members can help check toenails once a week for swelling or signs of infection. Continue reading >>

Alphabet Strategy For Diabetes Care: A Multi-professional, Evidence-based, Outcome-directed Approach To Management

Alphabet Strategy For Diabetes Care: A Multi-professional, Evidence-based, Outcome-directed Approach To Management

Alphabet Strategy for diabetes care: A multi-professional, evidence-based, outcome-directed approach to management James D Lee, Vinod Patel, Diabetes and Endocrinology Centre, George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust, CV10 7DJ Nuneaton, United Kingdom Ponnusamy Saravanan, Vinod Patel, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL Coventry, United Kingdom Author contributions: Lee JD wrote the article draft; Saravanan P and Patel V provided critical revisions related to important intellectual content of the manuscript; all authors approved the final version of the manuscript. Correspondence to: Dr. Vinod Patel, Diabetes and Endocrinology Centre, George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust, College Street, CV10 7DJ Nuneaton, Warwickshire, United Kingdom. [email protected] Telephone: +44-24-76865212 Fax: +44-24-76865409 Received 2014 Sep 4; Revised 2015 Mar 10; Accepted 2015 Apr 1. Copyright The Author(s) 2015. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. With the rising global prevalence in diabetes, healthcare systems are facing a growing challenge to provide efficient and effective diabetes care management in the face of spiralling treatment costs. Diabetes is a major cause of premature mortality and associated with devastating complications especially if managed poorly. Although diabetes care is improving in England and Wales, recent audit data suggests care remains imperfect with wide geographical variations in quality. Diabetes care is expensive with a sizeable amount of available expenditure used for treating the complications of diabetes. A target driven, long-term, multifactorial intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes has been shown to reduce mortality and morbidity. The alphabet strat Continue reading >>

Launch By Minister Of 'a Practical Guide To Integrated Type 2 Diabetes Care' - Icgp Web Site

Launch By Minister Of 'a Practical Guide To Integrated Type 2 Diabetes Care' - Icgp Web Site

Minister Varadkar launches new ICGP integrated care guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes These guidelines - 'A Practical Guide to Integrated Type 2 Diabetes Care' - outline a new model of care for type 2 diabetes. Care of patients with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes will now be delivered locally for patients by GPs and practice nurses with support from clinical nurse specialists in diabetes. Minister for Health Leo Varadkar launched on 4 February new integrated care guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes in general practice developed by the ICGP. The guidelines are supported by the HSE and were developed in conjunction with the National Clinical Programme Diabetes Working Group. Minister Varadkar said, "I commend the ICGP for developing these guidelines for integrated diabetes care. I want to shift the emphasis in our health service away from an 'illness model' dependent on care in hospitals to a model where primary care services are strengthened and health and wellbeing are promoted.We have already launched a Diabetes Cycle of Care for adult patients with type 2 diabetes who hold a medical card or GP visit card. To date, over 66,000 patients with diabetes have been registered for the service. Diabetes is increasing in Ireland and these guidelines from the ICGP will be invaluable for GPs in providing care to patients." Mr John Hennessy, HSE National Director for Primary Care, said, "I welcome these comprehensive integrated care guidelines for patients with diabetes which have been developed in partnership with clinical stakeholders, and I want to acknowledge the work of all involved. There is much evidence to indicate that a strong primary care system can exert a positive influence on appropriateness of care and on outcomes for diabetes patients - Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Office-visit Checklist: Key Clinical Tool For Primary Care Physicians

Type 2 Diabetes Office-visit Checklist: Key Clinical Tool For Primary Care Physicians

Type 2 Diabetes Office-Visit Checklist: Key Clinical Tool for Primary Care Physicians Diabetes , Diabetes Type 2 , HIV AIDS , Diabetes Type 2 As the number of people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) continues to grow, the burden of caring for them rests ever more heavily on the primary care provider. Time-limited clinical visits challenge physicians to effectively manage T2DM patients who typically suffer from multiple comorbidities, require regular monitoring, and who need ongoing education to guide appropriate self-care. Clinical guidelines are available (1) but it can be easy to overlook the basic aspects of care for these complex patients while keeping up with the daily clinic schedule and keeping track of guideline revisions. Studies have found that clinic-based interventions, such as diabetes practice aids and flow sheets, used in primary care, improve adherence to guideline-recommended standards for diabetes assessment and treatment. (2,3) The checklist provided here (clickon PDF below) was developed to help increase adherence to the current standards of care while optimizing the time in a short office visit. The document can be incorporated into electronic or paper charts to keep essential information in one place for quick reference and to allow maximum appointment time for the patients overall concerns. The format lets you quickly identify and prioritize ADA guideline-recommended areas for further attention and to set up timelines for monitoring. The idea of flow sheets, grade cards, and other diabetes aids is not novel; however this checklist reflects the most current American Diabetes Association guidelines(1) and includes recommendations for patients with T2DM established by the CDC and the Adult Treatment Panel III. FDA guidance on use of statins is also noted Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Checklist

Diabetes Management Checklist

Here is a summary of the guidelines that will help you manage your diabetes for a lifetime of good health: Plan what you eat and follow a balanced meal plan. See your dietitian at least once a year. Exercise at least five times a week for 30 minutes each session. Talk to your doctor before starting any exercise program. Tell your doctor what kind of exercise you want to do so adjustments can be made to your medicine schedule or meal plan, if necessary. Follow your medicine schedule as prescribed by your doctor. Know what medicines (brand and generic names) you are taking and how they work. Keep a list of your medicines with you at all times. Test your blood glucose regularly, as recommended by your health care provider. Test your blood glucose more often when you're sick. Try to continuously keep your blood glucose level at the recommended range. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dl and you have more than one unexplained low blood glucose reaction a week, call your doctor. If your blood glucose is greater than 160 mg/dl for more than a week or if you have two consecutive readings greater than 300 mg/dl, call your doctor. Contact your doctor when your blood glucose is over 300 mg/dl. Test your urine for ketones if recommended by your doctor. Record your blood glucose and urine ketone test results in a recordkeeping log. Bring your log book with you to all of your doctor's visits. Keep your scheduled appointments with your health care providers. See your doctor at least every three to four months for regular check-ups if you are treated with insulin. See your doctor every four to six months if you are treated with other diabetes medicines or if you are managing diabetes with diet and exercise alone. More frequent visits might be necessary if your blood glucose is n Continue reading >>

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