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Diabetes Canada Address

Exploring Canadian Physicians' Experiences With Diabetes Care For Indigenous Patients - Sciencedirect

Exploring Canadian Physicians' Experiences With Diabetes Care For Indigenous Patients - Sciencedirect

The perspectives of physicians caring for Indigenous patients with diabetes offer important insights into the provision of health-care services. The purpose of this study was to describe Canadian physicians' perspectives on diabetes care of Indigenous patients, a preliminary step in developing a continuing medical education intervention described elsewhere. Through in-depth semistructured interviews, Canadian family physicians and specialists with sizeable proportions of Indigenous clientele shared their experiences of working with Indigenous patients who have type 2 diabetes. Recruitment involved a purposive and convenience sampling strategy, identifying participants through existing research and the professional relationships of team members in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario. Participants addressed their understanding of factors contributing to the disease, approaches to care and recommendations for medical education. The research team framed a thematic analysis through a collaborative, decolonizing lens. The participants (n=28) included 3 Indigenous physicians, 21 non-Indigenous physicians and 4 non-Indigenous diabetes specialists. They practised in urban, reserve and rural adjacent-to-reserve contexts in 5 Canadian provinces. The physicians constructed a socially framed understanding of the complex contexts influencing Indigenous patients with diabetes in tension with structural barriers to providing diabetes care. As a result, physicians adapted care focusing on social factors and conditions that take into account the multigenerational impacts of colonization and the current social contexts of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Adaptations in diabetes care by physicians grounded in the historical, social and cultural contexts of their Indigenous Continue reading >>

Ada 2018 Standards Address Diabetes Drugs With Cv Benefit

Ada 2018 Standards Address Diabetes Drugs With Cv Benefit

ADA 2018 Standards Address Diabetes Drugs With CV Benefit The American Diabetes Association's annual guidelines for 2018 include new recommendations for use of glucose-lowering drugs with proven cardiovascular benefit in type 2 diabetes, optimization of diabetes care in elderly patients, and glucose screening of high-risk adolescents. The organization has also chosen to stick with its existing definition of hypertension in diabetes, of 140/90 mm Hg, in contrast to cardiology societies that have recently changed their guidance so that 130/80 mm Hg represents "stage 1 hypertension," including in diabetes. Probably the most anticipated and impactful new recommendation from the ADA calls for use of a glucose-lowering agent with proven cardiovascular benefit such as the glucagonlike peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonist liraglutide (Victoza Novo Nordisk) and/or mortality reduction such as that observed with the sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin (Jardiance, Boehringer Ingelheim/Lilly) in type 2 diabetes patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) who don't meet glycemic targets with lifestyle modification and metformin. "We now have drugs that are not only indicated to improve glycemic control but that reduce cardiovascular risk and mortality. So, based on some of the [ cardiovascular-outcomes] trials , there are new recommendations for treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes who fail metformin therapy, if there's a background of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease," the ADA's chief scientific, medical, and mission officer, William T Cefalu, MD, told Medscape Medical News. A new table outlines the data from recent cardiovascular-outcomes studies, and a new figure details the recommendations based on those (Section 8, page S97 Continue reading >>

D-camps - Camp Huronda

D-camps - Camp Huronda

Camp Huronda was founded in 1964. For seven years, Camp Huronda rented space at Camp Beausoleil and Camp Couchiching before finding a permanent home on Lake Waseosa in 1971, at the previous site of Camp Waseosa. Camp Huronda is the only camp facility owned by Diabetes Canada and the only camp that runs a full summer program. Camp Huronda is located on the shores of Lake Waseosa in Ontarios beautiful Muskoka area. It occupies 100 acres of land and includes gorgeous waterfront areas, a cool forest, and rugged hiking and mountain bike trails. Campers live in rustic cabins with their cabin mates and counsellors. Cabins are equipped with bunk beds with built in drawers or bed-side dressers, have emergency exits in the rear of the cabins and are also equipped with fire extinguisher and smoke detectors. Each cabin has an area for blood glucose (sugar) testing and supplies for treating lows, which are checked and replenished on a daily basis. All camper cabins have live-in counsellors who sleep overnight at camp to support our campers. Camp Huronda operates at a 3:8 ratio, meaning there are three counsellors for a maximum of eight campers per cabin. Washroom and shower facilities are located in buildings close to the cabins and campers have scheduled shower time every 48 hours. In addition to shower times, campers have the opportunity to swim almost every day. Please feel free to send camper mail clearly labeled to this address. Please note that all packages and large mail are opened prior to delivery due to allergies and food content. Parents and guardians may also email their campers at [email protected] . Please note that this is only an outgoing email service; campers are unable to reply to emails. Camp Huronda runs four, two week sessions throughout the summer. Thes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Canada | Recycling Council Of Alberta

Diabetes Canada | Recycling Council Of Alberta

Diabetes Canada has been operating a National recycling program for over 30 years. Every year, they ask Canadians to keep them in mind when they're cleaning and getting rid of gently used clothing and small household items. One hundred per cent of net proceeds raised by the program directly support Diabetes Canada and world-leading diabetes research, education and advocacy. Current activities include household pick up, donation box collection, community donation centres (recycling centres) and reuse retail outlets. Through 28 regional operations, they offer a recycling solution to over 2500 communities in Canada and divert over 48 million kg (100 million pounds) from the landfill annually. Dont find what youre looking for? For more information about recycling opportunities in Alberta, please visit Albertas Recycling Hotline at www.recyclinghotline.ca or call 1.800.463.6326 (from outside Alberta dial 604.683.6658) For more information about recycling opportunities in Alberta, please visit ALBERTAS RECYCLING HOTLINE . Copyright 2018 Recycling Council of Alberta. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

Go to: Methods Diabetes risk and incidence To estimate the predicted risk and number of new diabetes cases within the next 10 years, we used the Diabetes Population Risk Tool version 2.0. DPoRT 2.0 is an updated iteration of DPoRT, a predictive algorithm developed to calculate future population risk and incidence of physician- diagnosed diabetes in those aged 20 years and over. DPoRT was derived using national survey data individually linked to a chart-validated diabetes registry. This cohort was then used to create sex-specific survival models using baseline risk factors from the survey for diabetes incidence. Specifically, we assessed the probability of physician-diagnosed diabetes from the interview date until censoring for death or end of follow-up. The model was developed in the Ontario cohort and predictions from the model were validated against actual observed diabetes incidence in two external cohorts in Ontario and Manitoba. Variables used within its two sex-specific models include a combination of hypertension, ethnicity, education, immigrant status, body mass index, smoking status, heart disease and income. Full details on the model specification and validation can be found elsewhere. 7 The regression model can run on nationally available population health surveys and has been updated (DPoRT 2.0) and used to established prevention targets for diabetes.8 For this study, we used DPoRT 2.0 to generate incidence predictions based on the recent 2011 and 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). The CCHS collects information on the demographics, health status and determinants of health of the Canadian population. It is a nationally representative survey that uses a crosssectional study design and is administered on an ongoing basis, with annual data reporting. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Canada

Diabetes Canada

Diabetes Canada (known from 1953 to 2017 as the Canadian Diabetes Association or CDA) is a registered national charity whose mission includes serving the 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes.[1] Diabetes Canada programs include: Its programs, education and services support people living with diabetes in their daily fight to live as well as possible with diabetes; Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada represent the best evidence-based direction for health-care professionals; investments of more than $125 million in diabetes research since 1975; and Advocacy efforts have led governments to develop policies that respect the rights of people living with diabetes and access treatments they need to live healthy lives. History[edit] Dr.Charles Best, a co-inventor of medical insulin founded the Diabetic Association of Ontario in the late 1940s.[2] As other provinces and territories started to form their own associations, it became clear that if the provincial branches combined their resources they could more effectively serve their membership.[3] This culminated in the formation of the Canadian Diabetes Association in 1953.[4] On February 13, 2017, the Canadian Diabetes Association became Diabetes Canada. Today, Diabetes Canada is active in more than 150 Canadian communities and supports people living with diabetes through research, advocacy, education and services.[5] They are supported in their efforts by a community-based network of volunteers, employees, health-care professionals, researchers and partners. Known as “The Birthplace of Insulin,” Banting House, is where Sir Frederick Banting woke up at 2 a.m. on the morning of October 31, 1920 with the idea that led to the discovery of insulin. Diabetes Can Continue reading >>

Canadian Diabetes Association - National Office - Torontocentralhealthline.ca

Canadian Diabetes Association - National Office - Torontocentralhealthline.ca

Intersection: University Ave and Dundas St W Service Description: Information and literature on diabetes and health care * support groups, education, advocacy * funds research * resources for Aboriginal, Chinese, Latin American, South Asian and African Caribbean communities available on website * offices in local communities Clothesline Collection Program 1-800-505-5525 - Pick-up service for donations of reusable clothing, household items, cell phones and personal digital assistants * visit diabetes.ca/dropbox to find a location Summer D-Camps - Information on camp programs for children and youth with type 1 diabetes Central East Ontario Regional Leadership Centre (Barrie) Central South Ontario Regional Leadership Centre (Hamilton) Central West Ontario Regional Leadership Centre (Kitchener) Eastern Ontario Regional Leadership Centre (Ottawa) North East Ontario Regional Leadership Centre (Sudbury) North West Regional Leadership Centre (Thunder Bay) South East Ontario Regional Leadership Centre (Kingston) South Western Ontario Regional Leadership Office (London) Continue reading >>

Chapter 5—promoting Diabetes Prevention And Control

Chapter 5—promoting Diabetes Prevention And Control

Performance audit reports This report presents the results of a performance audit conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada under the authority of the Auditor General Act. A performance audit is an independent, objective, and systematic assessment of how well government is managing its activities, responsibilities, and resources. Audit topics are selected based on their significance. While the Office may comment on policy implementation in a performance audit, it does not comment on the merits of a policy. Performance audits are planned, performed, and reported in accordance with professional auditing standards and Office policies. They are conducted by qualified auditors who establish audit objectives and criteria for the assessment of performance; gather the evidence necessary to assess performance against the criteria; report both positive and negative findings; conclude against the established audit objectives; and make recommendations for improvement when there are significant differences between criteria and assessed performance. Performance audits contribute to a public service that is ethical and effective and a government that is accountable to Parliament and Canadians. Type 1 diabetes Includes about 5 to 10 percent of those with diabetes An autoimmune disease that typically arises in people under age 40 No known prevention Type 2 diabetes Includes about 90 to 95 percent of those with diabetes Higher risk for those who are overweight or obese, physically inactive, or members of certain ethnic populations Modifiable risk factors: weight, eating, smoking Non-modifiable risk factors: age, ethnicity, family history Gestational diabetes Detected in about 3 to 5 percent of all pregnancies that result in live birth Occurs when hyperglycemia develops dur Continue reading >>

General Inquiries | Diabetes Canada

General Inquiries | Diabetes Canada

Have a question about diabetes or Diabetes Canada? Let us know! Are you looking for information on diabetes, Diabetes Canada programs and services, membership or donations? Call 1-800-BANTING (226-8464) or email [email protected] . Learn more about our information and support services or request a free diabetes information package . Please note that Diabetes Canada can provide general information about diabetes and its management but cannot provide medical service or advice. Information, messages or articles on this site cannot replace consultations with qualified health-care professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Diabetes Canada reusable goods donation program Call 1-800-505-5525 or visit the Diabetes Canada resusable goods donation program section to schedule a FREE pick-up of your small household items and gently used clothing. Call 519-673-1752 or email [email protected] . You are welcome to mail us at our national office in Toronto: To connect with a member of Diabetes Canada's Executive Leadership Team, please email [email protected] Sara has lived with diabetes since she was ten and in 2016, her worst nightmare came true: her daughter Sophie was diagnosed with diabetes. This meant endless needles, blood sugar checks and constant worry. More than anything, Sara wants to End Diabetes so that Sophie can live to see a cure. Alone, we wont accomplish much. But together, we could give Sophie and millions of others a cure. Your support today can help fund a cure and END DIABETES NOW. Continue reading >>

Contact Us And Faqs | Diabetes Canada

Contact Us And Faqs | Diabetes Canada

How You Can Help > Declutter > Contact Us and FAQs We are always happy to hear from you! You can call us toll-free from anywhere at 1-800-505-5525. What is Diabetes Canada's reusable goods donation program? Diabetes Canadas reusable goods donation program has been in operation since 1985. We ask Canadians to keep us in mind when theyre cleaning and getting rid of gently used clothing, electronics and small household items. When you donate with Diabetes Canada, everyone wins. Proceeds raised by the program support world-leading diabetes research, education, programs, services and advocacy. Donors feel good knowing their used items are going towards a worthwhile cause and that reusable items are recycled, which has a positive effect on the environment. How do your donations help the environment? When you donate your reusable items to Diabetes Canada, you help the environment by responsibly processing your donations through the Think Recycle program. Each year, the program diverts more than 100 million lbs. of clothing and household items from landfill sites across Canada. This translates into savings of 942 million kWh of energy - equivalent to driving a compact car more than 46,000 times around the globe - and reduces our carbon footprint by 130 million kilograms. What type of donations will Diabetes Canada ACCEPT for pickup? General cloth items - bedding and bath items To help us serve you better, please keep the following in mind when booking a donation: All items must be small enough for one person to pick up and carry. No single item, bag, or box should weigh more than 40 lbs. Sorry, no large furniture or appliances. We do not accept any organic or hazardous materials. When packing up your items, please place textile items in standard 67L capacity garbage bags and h Continue reading >>

Jdrf Canada - General Donations

Jdrf Canada - General Donations

For all donations, the Canadian Revenue Agency requires that all tax receipts will be processed in the name of the cardholder. From the list below, please select the city closest to you:* Is this donation being made in support of a JDRF Revolution Ride or JDRF Walk participant?* If yes, please indicate the first and last name of the participant for which this donation is in support of. Make this donation on behalf of the company {ccType} ending in {ccLastFour} Change Payment Login to your account to prefill the fields below with your information. Do you have a connection to type 1 diabetes?* JDRF Canada is committed to protecting the personal information entrusted to us by our donors, participants, volunteers, and employees. We manage your personal information in accordance with the federal Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) and other applicable laws. To ensure consistency with privacy policy best practices, the JDRF Privacy Policy is organized around ten internationally recognized privacy principles, which are codified into law in Schedule I of PIPEDA. It also outlines the principles and practices we follow in protecting your personal information. This policy applies to JDRF and to any person providing services on our behalf. Personal information means information about an identifiable individual. This includes, for example, an individuals name, home address, and phone number, financial information and donation history. JDRF may also collect a minimal amount of personal health information from you or your guardian directly, such as your connection to type 1 diabetes (T1D) and, if applicable, when you were diagnosed. Personal employee information is personal information about an employee or volunteer that is collected, used, or disclo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Canada, Newmarket - Bayview Avenue, Clothing, Household Item And Used Vehicle Donations

Diabetes Canada, Newmarket - Bayview Avenue, Clothing, Household Item And Used Vehicle Donations

Fundraising and Resource Development Support ~ Diabetes PLEASE READ THIS IMPORTANT INFORMATION . . . The partners of the York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database are committed to provide a database that is accurate, up-to-date and comprehensive. However, we are unable to assume any liability resulting from errors or omissions. Inclusion or omission of a program or service is not a comment on its quality, nor does it mean we endorse or do not endorse the program or service. Please read the Inclusion Policy for further details. Please contact York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database to report concerns or to make suggestions. York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database focuses on records located in and serving the northern portion of York Region, but also maintains select resources beyond our borders which also support the residents of our respective municipalities. The partners of the York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database hold the intellectual property rights for the information on this site. You may display it on your computer and print or download this information for non-commercial, personal or educational purposes only. You must credit the York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database as the source on each copy of any information that originates from this site. The York Info Community Information & Volunteer Centre forbids any bulk downloading, or use of the database for any mass mailings, or other such usage. Please contact us for permission to use the information for any purpose other than those outlined here. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in Canada with more than 60,000 new cases yearly. Nine out of ten people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or postponed by making healthy lifestyle choices. Diabetes is a lifelong condition where either your body does not produce enough insulin, or the body cannot use the insulin it produces. The body needs insulin in order to change the sugar from food into energy. If your body does not have insulin or cannot use it properly, the result is a high blood sugar (glucose) level. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1, where the body makes little or no insulin. Type 2, where the body makes insulin but cannot use it properly. Gestational diabetes, where the body does not properly use insulin during pregnancy. This type of diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born. At the present, type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, and people living with type 1 diabetes depend on insulin to stay alive. It is estimated that close to two million Canadian adults have diabetes. One third of these people are unaware that they have the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in Canada and the cost of diabetes is estimated to be up to $9 billion a year. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes The classic symptoms of diabetes (type 1 and type 2) are the following: fatigue; frequent urination; unusual thirst; and unexplained weight loss. In type 1 diabetes, the symptoms usually progress quickly and are often dramatic. In type 2 diabetes, symptoms are slower to progress. However, it is important to note that many people who have type 2 diabetes may have no symptoms. These people may find out they have type 2 diabetes when they go to the doctor for another, unrelated prob Continue reading >>

Letter From Jdrf And Diabetes Canada To The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier Regarding Joint Recommendations Aimed At Ensuring Access To The Disability Tax Credit For Canadians With Diabetes

Letter From Jdrf And Diabetes Canada To The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier Regarding Joint Recommendations Aimed At Ensuring Access To The Disability Tax Credit For Canadians With Diabetes

Letter from JDRF and Diabetes Canada to the Honourable Diane Lebouthillier regarding joint recommendations aimed at ensuring access to the Disability Tax Credit for Canadians with diabetes Letter from JDRF and Diabetes Canada to the Honourable Diane Lebouthillier regarding joint recommendations aimed at ensuring access to the Disability Tax Credit for Canadians with diabetes The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, P.C., M.P. RE: Joint recommendations aimed at ensuring access to the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) for Canadians with diabetes We are writing to you with regard to the ability of people with diabetes to access the Disability Tax Credit. Further to our correspondence of October 4 and our meeting with your staff on October 25, 2017, we trust that the following clarifies our joint position on behalf of all those living with type 1 diabetes. In our meeting last week, the CRA confirmed that new direction was given to their reviewers at the beginning of May 2017 with respect to insulin therapy. Additional text began appearing in clarification and denial letters after this date asserting that An adult who independently manages insulin therapy on a regular basis does not generally meet the 14 hour per week criterion unless there are exceptional circumstances. For example, the existence of other chronic conditions that affect the time needed to manage the therapy or affect the ability to independently manage the therapy. As a result, the CRA has since May 1 been denying nearly every application for the Disability Tax Credit by adults living with type 1 diabetes, despite medical certification. The CRA has been asserting this despite the fact that the claimants doctors and nurses have been certifying that their patients ARE spending the required 14 hours on their therapy. Sin Continue reading >>

Abbott In Canada | Contact Us

Abbott In Canada | Contact Us

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