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Diabetes Campaign Uk

Nhs Diabetes Prevention Programme (nhs Dpp)

Nhs Diabetes Prevention Programme (nhs Dpp)

Most people would be shocked to know that around 22,000 people with diabetes die early every year. Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age and is a major contributor to kidney failure, heart attack, and stroke. There are currently 3.4 million people with Type 2 diabetes in England with around 200,000 new diagnoses every year. While Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented and is not linked to lifestyle, Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. One in six of all people in hospital have diabetes – while diabetes is often not the reason for admission, they often need a longer stay in hospital, are more likely to be re admitted and their risk of dying is higher. As well as the human cost, Type 2 diabetes treatment accounts for just under nine per cent of the annual NHS budget. This is around £8.8 billion a year. There are currently five million people in England at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. If these trends persist, one in three people will be obese by 2034 and one in 10 will develop Type 2 diabetes. There is strong international evidence which demonstrates how behavioural interventions, which support people to maintain a healthy weight and be more active, can significantly reduce the risk of developing the condition. The Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) identifies those at high risk and refers them onto a behaviour change programme. The NHS DPP is a joint commitment from NHS England, Public Health England and Diabetes UK. We are currently piloting a digital stream of the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme. Contact us If you are a participant on the programme and have a query, or if you are interested in getting involved in your local scheme, please contact your GP. N Continue reading >>

Our Campaigns | Diabetes Uk

Our Campaigns | Diabetes Uk

We campaign with and for people with diabetes to ensure that everyone affected by the condition gets access to the best treatment and standards of care. This is every persons right, irrespective of their age, ethnic group, postcode, ortype of diabetes. We lobby and brief key policy and government representatives and influential bodies across the UK. We alert them to shortcomings in diabetes care, and urge them to make the necessary improvements in the commissioning and provision of diabetes care and treatment. Our Make the Grade campaign saw the Government introduce new statutory guidance to improve support in schools to over 1 million children with long-term medical conditions, including Type 1 diabetes. Launching the 4 Ts campaign to raise awareness of the four most common symptoms of Type 1 diabetes and to make sure that children and young people get a quick diagnosis and early treatment. Workingwith clinicians and people with diabetes to develop the 15 healthcare essentials (a set of essential checks and services based on national health recommendations). We have now distributed over 1.5 million 15 Healthcare Essentials checkliststo people with diabetes, NHS trusts and healthcare professionals. In 2012 we made the checklist available in 12 languages and produced a 'what to do next' guide for those who aren't receiving the basic level of care they're entitled to. Launching the Putting Feet First campaign to improve foot care services for people with diabetes and to try to put an end to the thousands of preventable amputations every year. Developing and mobilising over 1,465 Diabetes Voices to lobby MPs, commissioners and local influencers in support of our campaigns.Last year Diabetes Voices took 941 campaigning actions,which included lobbyingtheir local hospital ch Continue reading >>

'largest-ever Diabetes Awareness Campaign To Urge High-risk Patients To Visit Their Gp

'largest-ever Diabetes Awareness Campaign To Urge High-risk Patients To Visit Their Gp

Largest-ever diabetes awareness campaign to urge high-risk patients to visit their GP This autumn, Diabetes UK will be launching the biggest-ever awareness campaign about Type 2 diabetes. Watch out for the advertising, which kicks off on Monday 23 September. Research says that the general public struggle to identify all of the factors that put someone at risk of Type 2 diabetes in particular being over 40, having a large waist and being black or South Asian.Thats why the campaign aims to raise awareness of the risk factors of Type 2 diabetes. It also aims: To enable people who are at risk to understand their personal risk of developing the condition To encourage people in at-risk groups to check their risk of Type 2 diabetes, and to provide information on what they should do next, depending on their risk level. The campaign will urge people to check their risk online or by visiting a Tesco pharmacy, or other pharmacy. It will also encourage them to go to their GP if they have concerns about Type 2 diabetes. The campaign will run for two weeks from Monday 23 September 2013, and will be visible across the UK through outdoor, digital and radio advertising, and in Tesco stores. It has been made possible thanks to a National Charity Partnership with Tesco. Diabetes UK will be targeting people who are at risk of Type 2 diabetes. Theyare carefully targeting areas where there are large populations of people at high risk of the condition, so the campaign reaches the people it needs to. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk Campaign Breached Code, Says Fundraising Regulator

Diabetes Uk Campaign Breached Code, Says Fundraising Regulator

Diabetes UK campaign breached code, says fundraising regulator Fundraising Standards Board finds charitys pedometer campaign misled public and misused personal data for fundraising calls Last modified on Fri 13 Nov 2015 03.47EST Diabetes UKs campaign was not solely designed to assist the public by raising awareness of diabetes, says Andrew Hind, chair of the Fundraising Standards Board.Photograph: Alamy A Diabetes UK campaign misled the public and misused personal data, the Fundraising Standards Board has found. The awareness campaign which encouraged individuals to text the charity to receive a free pedometer and diabetes guide breached four clauses of the Code of Fundraising Practice including misleading contacts, not clearly allowing individuals to opt out, not processing personal data fairly and lawfully and disguising marketing calls as administrative processes. Charity fundraising review: key points for the voluntary sector A member of public complained when she received a phone call from telephone fundraising agency Listen Ltd, after texting Diabetes UK, to arrange the delivery of the pedometer and ask for a regular donation of 10 a month. Andrew Hind, chair of the FRSB, said: Diabetes UKs pedometer campaign was not solely designed to assist the public by raising awareness of diabetes. It also had a clear motive to solicit contact details for a subsequent fundraising approach to those who responded. As a result, we have concluded that the charitys campaign misled the public. The FRSBs report states that the complainant felt deceived by the charity to use her contact details in this way, and is said to have also felt pressurised to donate by the caller, despite saying she was unemployed due to ill health. Stephen Lee, professor of voluntary sector management at C Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Campaign Aimed At Uk Asians Wins National Award

Diabetes Awareness Campaign Aimed At Uk Asians Wins National Award

Diabetes awareness campaign aimed at UK Asians wins national award Diabetes awareness campaign aimed at UK Asians wins national award Award winning: raising awareness of diabetes among UK South Asians with a Bollywood DVD; University of Huddersfield A HEALTH education team that includes University of Huddersfields senior academic and researcher in pharmacy practice Dr Mahendra Patel has received a major national award for its work in raising awareness of diabetes among UK Asians. A specially-produced Bollywood-style movie has been among the wide variety of campaigning material that helped to spread the message. At the 2015 British Medical Journal Awards, the trophy for Diabetes Team of the Year went to a specialist group from the South Asian Health Foundation (SAHF). Dr Patel is a member of the team and joined three of his colleagues to collect the prize at a London ceremony. During 2014, the SAHFs diabetes campaigners delivered 11 grassroots education campaigns to a diversity of South Asian communities in seven UK cities where diabetes is known to be most prevalent. This schedule plus a portfolio of other work helped to secure the BMJ award. The material produced by SAHF to back up its message has included a DVD entitled Sweet Talk, which uses Bollywood techniques and imagery to dramatise the risks run by central character, a middle-aged, overweight man who smokes and eats to excess. A more recent focus has been on special presentations by the SAHF diabetes team including Dr Patel that have taken place in venues such as community centres and places of worship. Using a variety of visual aids and printed material, the campaigners have put over their message about how lifestyle changes can cut the risks of diabetes and they also exploded several myths and misconceptions Continue reading >>

Fear And Shame Leading To People With Type 2 Diabetes Risking Future Life Threatening Conditions

Fear And Shame Leading To People With Type 2 Diabetes Risking Future Life Threatening Conditions

New campaign launches to highlight how emotional and psychological factors are impacting effective diabetes management Guildford, United Kingdom – 14 November 2016 – Sanofi today announced that new research reveals that negative emotions are jeopardising people living with Type 2 (T2) diabetes’* ability to effectively manage their condition. A quarter of people with T2 diabetes feel anxious or fearful about getting ‘hypos’ (low blood glucose levels), with 42% preferring to have high blood glucose levels instead of risking another ‘hypo’, despite this risking life threatening conditions in the future.1 *Please note that all references in the press release to ‘people with type 2 diabetes’ refer only to those who are diagnosed and on insulin The UK has the worst T2 diabetes blood glucose levels in Europe2, so Sanofi is launching a new campaign dedicated to helping patients - ‘Highs & Lows: Better Balance for a Better Future’, that includes a Sanofi sponsored patient support website, to help the 52% of patients with T2 diabetes who find it challenging to balance their blood glucose levels or who worry about doing so.1 Another Sanofi-funded study conducted in UK adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and published in the journal Diabetic Medicine, showed even modest and sustained improvement in blood glucose control could help prevent almost a million serious medical complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, foot ulcer and amputations, and potentially blindness, which could avoid billions in future NHS costs.3 Dr Max Pemberton, GP and Psychiatrist at St Anne’s Hospital, London explains: “This research shows that people with T2 diabetes are making fear-driven decisions in the ‘here and now’ to prevent low blood glucose levels, without co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk And Tesco Launch 2m Ad Campaign

Diabetes Uk And Tesco Launch 2m Ad Campaign

Diabetes UK and Tesco launch 2m ad campaign Diabetes UK and Tesco launch 2m ad campaign Diabetes UK and Tesco have launched a 2m advertising campaign to raise awareness of the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes UK and Tesco have launched a 2m advertising campaign to raise awareness of the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. The campaign is part of Diabetes UKs charity partnership with Tesco, aiming to raise 10m to help those affected by or at risk of diabetes. The campaign kicks off today and will run until October 6 with on-street, radio, transport and digital advertising raising awareness of the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes - weight; waist size; ethnicity and family history. Diabetes UK is concerned that although up to 80 per cent of Type 2 cases could be prevented through lifestyle changes, unless people understand the seriousness of the condition then they are unlikely to see the need to find out their own risk or make the lifestyle changes that can help prevent it. Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said: Most people do not understand the potential consequences of developing Type 2 diabetes. We hope our advertising campaign will help people realise the importance of understanding their own risk of Type 2 and making lifestyle changes if they are one of the seven million of us who are at high risk. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk Hosts Pop Up Shoe Shop To Highlight Disease-related Amputations

Diabetes Uk Hosts Pop Up Shoe Shop To Highlight Disease-related Amputations

Diabetes UK hosts pop up shoe shop to highlight disease-related amputations By Natalie Mortimer -30 April 2016 11:02am Diabetes UK has kicked of a new campaign via a pop up shoe shop in London to deliver a message about the consequences of having diabetes. Located just off Brick Lane in Londons East End Amp Shoes, which opened last week, was a shoe store with a twist as each shoe represents one of the 135 feet or lower limbs amputated in England every week because of diabetes. The campaign was created by Langland in partnership with Diabetes UK, Awesome Films, and global fashion and design company Eley Kishimoto, with the aim of not only raising awareness of the condition, but to drive people to get tested through the diabetes UK Risk score. "Health awareness messages are notoriously difficult to make stick, said Andrew Spurgeon, executive creative director, Langland. "People are tired of being lectured and quick to switch off from traditional communication channels, which is why Langland created Amp Shoes, a shoe store that focuses attention on the rising number of diabetes-related amputations in a completely fresh and unexpected way". The campaign was complemented by the social campaign #OneShoe selfie, which saw people all over the UK sharing a photo of themselves wearing just one shoe in support of those that only have one to wear. Continue reading >>

Our Prevention Work | Diabetes Uk

Our Prevention Work | Diabetes Uk

There is no cure for diabetes. The good news is that three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. So we're working to help you take action. We're supporting people across the UK to find out their risk and take action to reduce it. But this problem is too big to tackle alone, which is why we're working to make it easier for people to make healthy choices every day. We're doing this by raising awareness about risk, helping you to takeaction , creating a healthier environment and funding ground-breaking research . The NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) We're working with the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) to helppeople at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes become healthier and avoid the condition. It's the first national programme to do this. In March 2019, the programme will be renewed and we'd like to hear your views on plans to make it even more accessible. Readmore about the proposed changes inour NHSDPP information sheet (PDF, 339KB)and help us shape the programme for the future. Its really important that everyone understands their risk of Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is still widely misunderstood.Many people are not aware of the causes of Type 2 diabetes or their risk of developing it. This is why its so important for people across the UK to find out their risk. Our Know Your Risk tool, developed with the University of Leicester, helps people to find out their risk and what to do to lower it. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk Campaign Targets People At Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Across Ealing

Diabetes Uk Campaign Targets People At Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Across Ealing

Diabetes UK campaign targets people at risk of Type 2 diabetes across Ealing Diabetes UK campaign targets people at risk of Type 2 diabetes across Ealing Hundreds of posters will blanket the borough and encourage people to check their risk. Hard-hitting adverts encouraging people to check their risk of Type 2 diabetes will appear across Ealing (from January 19) in a bid to help people avoid some of the devastating complications of the condition. The adverts describe some of the potential impacts of Type 2 diabetes such as the risks of blindness, stroke, heart attack and amputation, along with the emotional impact of the condition on family members. As well as large roadside hoardings, the adverts will appear at bus-stops across the borough to catch the eye of people travelling to and from work and will also be positioned at busy shopping centres and road junctions. Dr Raj Chandok, Vice-chair and Diabetes Lead for Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group, said: In Ealing, one in seven residents are at high risk of developing diabetes. This campaign aims to raise the awareness of diabetes and the importance of the diabetes risk score which has been developed by Diabetes UK. It is evidence-based and has been taken by over 700,000 people nationally. I have completed the online risk score and can assure people that it is very quick and easy to do." Roz Rosenblatt, London regional manager for Diabetes UK said: We are taking the fight against Type 2 diabetes out onto the streets. We want everyone in Ealing to see the adverts and perhaps have a chat about them to their friends and neighbours as they wait for a bus or pick the children up from school. Several thousand people in Ealing have undiagnosed diabetes and the sooner they get help the better. More than 19,500 people in Ealin Continue reading >>

Our Campaigns - Diabetes Uk

Our Campaigns - Diabetes Uk

Testing times: access to diabetes test strips Our surveyfound that 1 in 4 people face difficultiesgetting the amount of test strips theyneed to test their blood glucose (sugar) levels. This is bothshocking and dangerous. Testing regularly is important for all people with Type1 diabetes and many people with Type 2 diabetes, depending on their medicationand personal situation. We heard from peoplethat these restrictions created serious problems in terms of managing theirdiabetes effectively. We know thatover the longer term poor management can lead to complications. We want to makesure people know their rights and can challenge restrictions to their teststrips. In most cases, where people challenge the restriction to their teststrips, the decision is reversed. InEngland and Wales weve created an online action which allows youto write to localhealth bosses to raise and challenge any restrictions you have faced. If you're in Scotland and Northern Ireland, you can share your experience to help us understand more about what's happening in your area. Would you like to hear about other ways you can get involved in Diabetes UK campaigns? Just tick below to tell us how you would prefer to be contacted. Diabetes UK would love to keep you updated on our work and on the different ways you can support us, including financial support. Please tick the ways you are happy to be contacted. Please tick if you DO NOT wish to receive communications by post or telephone about the work of Diabetes UK and its trading company Find out more about the test strips campaign Rationing blood glucose test strips is unsafe and puts the health of people with diabetes at risk. It is an unacceptable example of short-termism, storing up long-term costs for the NHS because diabetes complications are extreme Continue reading >>

Re: Diabetes Uk Defends Its Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Campaign

Re: Diabetes Uk Defends Its Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Campaign

Re: Diabetes UK defends its type 2 diabetes awareness campaign Diabetes UK defends its type 2 diabetes awareness campaign BMJ 2013; 347 doi: (Published 27 November 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;347:f7025 Re: Diabetes UK defends its type 2 diabetes awareness campaign First do no harm a response to Louise Ansari, Diabetes UK We were interested to read the Letter to the Editor by Louise Ansari, Diabetes UK Director of Communications, who wrote to defend the recent Diabetes UK campaign designed to raise awareness of the seriousness of type 2 diabetes. The campaign, she indicates, targeted people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and was informed by consultation and market research. Of course, we welcome this as an evidence-based approach to enhancing the effects of public health campaigns [1]. However, we have concerns about several aspects of the campaign. First, the letter states that people do not understand how serious type 2 diabetes is, why people at high risk must try to prevent it, or why those who already have it need to be diagnosed. This may well be true for people without the illness, although no reference to scientific research was offered to support this claim. More importantly, the campaign, showing various versions of tearful adults, offered no concrete knowledge message other than that of type 2 diabetes being associated with great emotional devastation. It is unclear why eliciting feelings of fear and devastation would be considered conducive to helping people understand how serious type 2 diabetes is, or why it might help those who already have it [understand the] need to be diagnosed in the absence of any concrete information for people to process? Research has shown clearly that fear campaigns per se are unhelpful in leading people to take prev Continue reading >>

Uk: Survey With Diabetes Group And Press Campaign

Uk: Survey With Diabetes Group And Press Campaign

National activities Gum Health Day United Kingdom UK: Survey with diabetes group and press campaign The links between periodontal health and diabetes are the focus on the British Society of Periodontology s activities for European Gum Health Day. It has worked with the online diabetes community Diabetes.co.uk (one of the biggest such groups in Europe) to commission a survey to measure the awareness of the links between periodontal disease and diabetes. There will be a follow-up survey in six months. Later, the two organisations will produce a report about the findings as well as educational graphic material to be used to address both health professionals and the public. At the same time, the BSP and Diabetes.co.uk have launched communications campaign targeted at the dental press and at health journalists on the national press. Articles have already appeared on specialist website such as Denistry.co.uk and The Diabetes Times , as well as on the website of the national newspaper the Daily Express . The BSPs social-media channels (10,193 followers on Facebook and 861 on Twitter) are supporting the campaign and the society will provide posters and flyers at two major UK dental exhibitions and conferences. Continue reading >>

A New Approach To Tackling Type 2 Diabetes Is A Step Forward For Prevention

A New Approach To Tackling Type 2 Diabetes Is A Step Forward For Prevention

As waistlines continue to expand across the country (62% of adults are overweight or obese), diagnoses of Type 2 diabetes are also rising. The cost of treating diabetes, and associated complications such as heart disease and stroke, is costing the NHS around £10bn every year. Trends are only going one way – with one in ten adults expected to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes by 2034. And we know the risks – those who are overweight, physically inactive or have a family history of diabetes are at increased risk of developing the condition, as are people of South Asian, African, and African-Caribbean descent and less affluent individuals and populations. With 5 million people in England at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, we urgently need to see a major drive towards diabetes prevention in the UK, and the launch of Healthier You: the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme represents an important step forward. The programme aims to identify those at high risk and refer them into evidence-based behavioural interventions to help them reduce that risk through achieving and/or maintaining a healthy weight, recommended levels of activity and a healthy, balanced diet. It’s an important part of a wider range of work to tackle a disease that is already a huge burden on the NHS, by shrinking the numbers of people living with Type 2 diabetes in the future. An evidence-based solution We published a systematic review in August last year that examined the effectiveness of ‘real-world’ interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes in high risk populations. The review looked closely at the following areas: The effectiveness of diabetes prevention programmes on reducing cases of Type 2 diabetes and reducing weight in high risk populations The population groups that see Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk

Diabetes Uk

For the online medical resource, see Patient UK. Diabetes UK is a British-based patient, healthcare professional and research charity that describes itself as the "leading UK charity that cares for, connects with and campaigns on behalf of all people affected by and at risk of diabetes."[1] The charity campaigns for improvements in the care and treatment of people with diabetes. History[edit] Diabetes UK was founded in 1934 as The Diabetic Association, by the author H. G. Wells and Dr R. D. Lawrence.[2] Diabetes UK's first research grant was made in 1936.[3] The organisation has since had two name changes—in 1954 to The British Diabetic Association and again in June 2000 to Diabetes UK.[2] Diabetes UK's first voluntary group was set up in 1939; 350 groups are now spread out across the UK. There are also local offices across England and national offices in Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. They run conferences for their volunteers and healthcare professionals in the field of diabetes. The charity has been running care holidays since the 1930s for children. Family and adult holidays have been introduced since. The holidays aim to provide support and advice in a fun surrounding.[4] In 1993, a counselling line for patients, family and friends was launched with recorded diabetes information available 24 hours a day.[5] Research[edit] Diabetes UK provides extensive funding for United Kingdom-based research into the causes and treatment of diabetes and its complications. The charity's first research grant was made in 1936.[3] The charity provides financial support for "project grants, funding to purchase laboratory equipment, and research-training opportunities ranging from PhD studentships to research fellowships."[6] In 2011, the charity awarded £1,035,743 to five ne Continue reading >>

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