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Diabetes Awareness In November

Diabetes Awareness In November

Browse: Home / Diabetes Awareness in November Some Definitions: Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes The terms type 2 diabetes and prediabetes can be confusing. Here are simple definitions. Type 2 diabetes, formerly known as adult onset diabetes, is diagnosed when your bodys pancreas cannot metabolize blood glucose (sugar levels) to within normal levels. The result is extreme highs and lows that can be life threatening. If these highs and lows are not controlled a person with type 2 diabetes will be at increased the risk for heart and kidney disease, retinopathy (which leads to blindness), and amputation. Prediabetesis when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not quite high enough to qualify as a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. The Risk of Diabetes Can Be Substantially Reduced What if you knew today that many of your employees will develop diabetes and be diagnosed 10, 20 or even 30 years from now if they continued their current lifestyle habits? Would you ask them to do anything differently if you could help them reduce their risk by almost 60% and save future additional workplace costs? Early Diagnosis and Effective Management is Critical The changes of co morbidities such as heart and kidney disease, retinopathy (which leads to blindness), and amputation can be reduced with early diagnosis and effective management. Complications associated with type 2 diabetes can begin as early as five to six years prior to diagnosis, during which time these co morbidities are already developing, co morbidities that result in higher medical costs, presenteeism, and absenteeism in the workplace. Once diabetes or pre diabetes is diagnosed it can be effectively controlled with lifestyle changes and in some cases with medication. Just a few simple lifestyle changes can make all th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month: 12 Ways To Get Involved Together

Diabetes Awareness Month: 12 Ways To Get Involved Together

November is Diabetes Awareness Month, a time to shine the spotlight on diabetes and diabetes research. Ready to get involved? Here are some noteworthy events happening across the country along with suggestions for creative ways you and your family can raise awareness about diabetes in your community. Observe JDRF’s T1Day What better way to kick off the month? The JDRF-sponsored T1Day, held each year on November 1, is an opportunity to get people everywhere more engaged in talking about type 1 diabetes. Suggested T1Day activities include visiting your child’s class for a kid-friendly diabetes Q&A, encouraging your child to write to the local paper about type 1 awareness, and sharing some of your story via social media. Even something as simple as a tweet describing how diabetes has affected your family’s life can be a rich conversation starter. Tag your message with #T1Day to connect with others in the diabetes community. Ryan Reed was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17, just as his racing career was taking off. At diagnosis, he was told he’d never race again. Now, at age 22, Ryan is driving for Roush Fenway Racing in the No. 16 Lilly Diabetes/American Diabetes Association Ford Mustang in the NASCAR® Xfinity® Series. Stop by or tune in for races on November 7 (Texas Motor Speedway), November 14 (Phoenix International Speedway), and November 21 (Homestead-Miami Speedway). November 14 is World Diabetes Day, an annual observance marked all across the globe. The “Go Blue” campaign encourages supporters to do just that for the occasion: Dress your family in blue and go blue at home by putting a blue bulb in your porch light or lighting a blue candle. Let it shine! Diabetes Social Media Advocacy founder Cherise Shockley encourages you to wear blue on all fo Continue reading >>

What's Happening For Diabetes Awareness Month And World Diabetes Day 2016

What's Happening For Diabetes Awareness Month And World Diabetes Day 2016

November is upon us -- the time of year when "all eyes are on diabetes" for National Diabetes Awareness Month and World Diabetes Day on Nov. 14. That day was chosen in honor of Dr. Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin back in 1921, who would be 125 years old were he still alive to celebrate this birthday! This National Diabetes Month campaign has been going on for much longer than many realize; it was established over four decades ago in 1975, though the American Diabetes Association (ADA) didn't trademark the term "American Diabetes Month" until 1997. Meanwhile, World Diabetes Day was launched by the International Diabetes Federation in 1991 to call attention to this worldwide epidemic, and it got a big boost when the United Nations issued a resolution on it in 2006. The first-ever WDD was recognized in 2007. All of these November observances exploded about a decade ago with the emergence of the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), where people can easily create and promote new campaigns and initiatives. Some of these repeat annually, while others are specific to a particular year. Leading up to November, President Barack Obama issued the now-annual presidential proclamation marking November as National Diabetes Awareness Month. On Oct. 28, the White House posted this symbolic gesture of official federal government recognition of our condition, which they've been doing since the mid-1980s. Here's a quick look at what’s on offer in November 2016 from some prominent advocacy organizations. Of course, if you know of any other activities, please let us know in comments below! ADA's Story Site As always, the ADA is active for this NDAM 2016. Mainly, the org is launching a brand new This Is Diabetes campaign, which is a story-telling effort based on the idea that no Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Raise Awareness For Diabetes

7 Ways To Raise Awareness For Diabetes

The phrase diabetes awareness often crops up when we hear stories of diabetes being poorly represented or understood, and we regularly cite the need for awareness to be increased. Last month, fitness company Crossfit tweeted an ironic slogan for Coca-Cola open diabetes. Three weeks later, an Irish cinema apologised to a nine-year-old boy with type 1 after they prevented him from bringing in his own water to a film screening. These unfortunate situations arise due to a lack of diabetes awareness, and unless businesses and individuals are highlighted for their errors, more and more frustrating myths about diabetes will continue to be perpetuated. But what can we actually do to raise awareness? Here are seven great ways to contribute. Keep an eye out for petitions encouraging government changes that would benefit people with diabetes. When these gain momentum, they make news, and in turn boost awareness. Most recently, a petition has called for the symptoms of type 1 diabetes to be added to the NHS Red Book to highlight the dangers of undiagnosed type 1. In 2014, the JDRF launched the #CountMeIn petition to increase government funding for type 1 research, which was achieved. Diabetic children face more challenges than most kids, and one effort made to assist them is The InDependent Diabetes Trusts (IDDT) Parents Passport for Schools. The IDDT School Passport helps teachers who arent specifically trained to deal with diabetes understand the needs of diabetic children. It gives teachers all the facts they need to help children with type 1 diabetes, including information on meal times, insulin delivery, and hypo warning signs. Hypos are scary. Not just for the person having one, but for helpless onlookers unable to identify the symptoms or treat it properly. Too often, its s Continue reading >>

Identification, Prevention And Management Of Diabetes - Ideas (publish, Detailed Submission)

Identification, Prevention And Management Of Diabetes - Ideas (publish, Detailed Submission)

Identification, prevention and management of diabetes Identification, prevention and management of diabetes A waterfall starts with one drop of rain, help us to make a waterfall by sharing the differences that you have made, which could be spread across the region, to improve the lives of people with diabetes - either through identification, prevention or the management of the condition. Diabetes is a significant public health concern; it is known to affect approximately 3.2 million people in the UK and those individuals are at significantly increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke and renal disease. In the under 75 age group type 2 diabetes can be prevented in 80% and if caught early and managed well complications can be reduced by more than 50% resulting in extended life expectancy. We would like to hear about work that you have done to support people with pre-diabetes or diabetes with a focus onan integrated approach to diabetes which streamlines coordinated management across primary, secondary and, most important of all, self-care. The expected outcomes we are seeking should lead to earlier and more aggressive prevention and intervention, more timely referral to secondary services and as a result an overall improvement in health outcomes for these individuals. The very real financial benefits would be seen in the short, medium and longer term. This would be in relation to cost-efficient care and prevention of costly interventions such as in CVD care. You are welcome to submit new innovations, and comment or vote on existing ones. Solesee is a foot inspection mirror designed for people with diabetes to help them see the whole of the bottom of their feet to check for cuts, grazes, dry skin & blisters. Solesee makes this much easier to achieve and encourages Continue reading >>

Awareness Campaigns

Awareness Campaigns

World Diabetes Day is the world's largest diabetes awareness campaign and ismarked every year on November 14. World Diabetes Day reaches over 1 billionpeople in over 160 countries and aims to highlight key issues relating to diabetes. Women and Diabetes our right to a healthy future This year's theme focuses on women who are currently living with diabetes and the need to promote affordable and equitable access to essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes. The theme also highlights the importance of all women adopting healthy lifestyles to increase their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes from occurring. All women living with diabetes need affordable and equitable access to care and education to better manage their diabetes and improve their health outcomes. Pregnant women need more access to screening, care and education to achieve positive health outcomes for both mother and child. Women and girls are key agents in the adoption of healthy lifestyles to improve the health and wellbeing of future generations. Click here to find out more about World Diabetes Day 2017 and download the campaign resources. World Diabetes Day Rundle Mall Meet Diabetes SA at Rundle Mall on Tuesday 14 November 2017. To help raise the community's awareness of the prevention of type 2 diabetes, this year Diabetes SA's Health Services Team are heading to Rundle Mall to hand out the Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk (AusDrisk) Assessment Tool for everyone to calculate their own risk. If you're in the city on this day, please come along and say hello; our health services team will be on hand if you have any diabetes-related questions. This year Diabetes SA will mark World Diabetes Day with a seminar for Continue reading >>

Ideas To Get Involved With Diabetes Awareness Month | Diabetic Connect

Ideas To Get Involved With Diabetes Awareness Month | Diabetic Connect

Ideas To Get Involved With Diabetes Awareness Month Ideas to Get Involved with Diabetes Awareness Month By Jeanette Terry Latest Reply2013-11-10 12:13:53 -0600 November is diabetes awareness month, so now is the time to get out there and raise awareness. If you aren't sure what to do you can always participate in the Big Blue Test. It is an easy way to show support and help a great cause. You can find more information about it here: For more ideas on how to get involved check out this article: In April the doctor put me on insulin while I was in the hospital for bypass surgery. As of the end of August 2013 I am no longer taking any meds for diabetes. The only thing I am taking is for my blood pressure and I may come of that in April 2014. I went back to truck driving 24 September! Talk about glad to be out of the house!! Oh, I weighed in at 210 pounds when I had surgery and now my weight ranges from 180 to 185. I still watch what and when I eat and walk as much as possible. I try to do a 12 hour fast everyday and that seems to help keep my blood sugar at a 'normal' level. Since surgery I am unable to eat as much as I used to. I guess tha's a good thing. Every one take care out there Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

The biggest month for diabetes awareness activities is only a few days away, and it’s the perfect time to raise your voice to increase awareness about diabetes! You might ask: Why? How does more awareness meaningfully impact the lives of people with diabetes? The question is a good one, but the answer is simple. Awareness is the first step to any kind of change. More funding for research, better public support for legislation issues. More understanding and empathy. Less blame and shame. Awareness + education is even more powerful. Knowing symptoms of type 1 can be life-saving when a diagnosis is right around the corner. If you’re at risk for type 2, education can help prevent or delay the progression of the disease (in cases where you’re able to do that). And education that helps our communities offer support (instead of blame) through a very challenging disease is invaluable. Here’s a list of different ways you and your family and friends can make an impact for diabetes in your community. 1. Make Social Noise with JDRF’s Thunderclap Campaign Once again JDRF kicks off National Diabetes Awareness Month on November 1st with type 1 diabetes awareness day, “T1D”, a day devoted to raising the voices of people touched by type 1 diabetes. Use the web platform “Thunderclap” to join in an auto-generated, mass-shared social media post All you have to do is sign-up on the JDRF #noT1D Thunderclap page. Show your friends, family, and the public you can live well with this disease and chase your dreams – whether that’s running marathons, travelling the world, falling in love, or advocating for a cause. The Instagram contest will ask you to show a photo of how you’re doing just that along with a few sentences on what it’s like to live with diabetes. Look for Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

9 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

This post is sponsored by Medtronic The biggest month for diabetes awareness activities is here, and it’s the perfect time to raise your voice to increase awareness about diabetes! You might ask: Why? How does more awareness impact the lives of people with diabetes in a meaningful way? The question is a good one, but the answer is simple. Awareness is the first step to any kind of change. More funding for research, better public support for legislation issues. More understanding and empathy. Less blame and shame. Awareness + education is even more powerful. Knowing symptoms of type 1 diabetes can be life-saving when a diagnosis is right around the corner. If you’re at risk for type 2, education can help prevent or delay the progression of the disease (in cases where you’re able to do that). And education that helps our communities offer support (instead of blame) through a very challenging disease is invaluable. Here’s a list of different ways you and your family and friends can make an impact for diabetes in your community. 1. ADA This Is DiabetesTM Campaign The ADA is showcasing real-life stories of people with diabetes and their care partners managing the everyday successes and challenges of diabetes. Help the ADA raise awareness by submitting your own story to communicate the experiences of those who know and understand diabetes the best. Share your story, photo, or video on social media using #ThisIsDiabetes. 2. Take The Big Blue Test Another annual favorite, the Diabetes Hands Foundation asks you to take the Big Blue Test by doing 14-20 minutes of exercise of your choice, testing your blood sugar, and sharing your results either online or through your smartphone app. Each entry you log between October 14th and November 14th triggers a $3 donation on your b Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and much government and media attention is focused on the need to slow the growing “epidemic” of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States. Efforts to this end include the American Diabetes Association’s Stop Diabetes campaign, which encourages people to take an online risk test to assess their personal risk of developing prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes and to see a doctor if their test results suggest a high risk. But what if you already have diabetes? Is there anything in National Diabetes Month for you? Of course there is! For people who already have diabetes, it’s as good a time as any to take a look at your diabetes management and ask yourself how things are going. Are there areas that need improvement? Are you interested in connecting with other people who have diabetes? Would you like to participate in a diabetes fundraiser? Would you like to learn something new? Here are some suggestions for making the most of a month devoted to diabetes. 1. Commit to a new healthy habit for one month. Many lifestyle habits — not just eating and exercising — can affect your general health and your diabetes management. Some may affect your blood glucose levels directly, and others may have a more indirect effect, enabling or preventing you from carrying out your daily routines, for example. Rather than choose something you feel you “should” do, pick something you feel able and willing to do. Here are some ideas: Get more sleep. Not getting enough sleep can increase insulin resistance, meaning your body requires more insulin to get glucose into your cells. This can lead to higher blood glucose levels and is believed to have other negative health effects. Inadequate sleep also tends to leave you feeling fatigued during the day Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Resources

World Diabetes Day Resources

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is the primary global awareness campaign of the diabetes community. A variety of resources are available to help mark the day, raise awareness of diabetes and show your support for the 415 million people currently living with diabetes. The theme of WDD 2017 is Women and Diabetes: our right to a healthy future. If you are interested in adapting or reproducing any of the resources, please contact [email protected] WDD17 Campaign Toolkit Continue reading >>

About The National Diabetes Education Program

About The National Diabetes Education Program

The National Diabetes and Education Program (NDEP) works collaboratively with its partners at the federal, state, and local levels to improve the treatment and outcomes for people with diabetes, promote early diagnosis, and prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. NDEP is jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Strategic Plan for 2014-2019 – NDEP’s strategic plan outlines its goals, objectives, and strategies. Executive Committee and Groups – NDEP’s committees and groups provide input and guidance for NDEP activities. Partner and Community Organizations – NDEP collaborates with its partners to achieve shared goals. NDEP’s History NDEP was founded in 1997 to translate the findings of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) , which showed—that improved blood glucose levels can make a big difference in reducing complications associated diabetes. Since then NDEP has worked to translate findings of other major studies into practice including, but not limited to: United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) – In response to the findings of the UKPDS, NDEP outreach evolved to address the ABCs of diabetes: comprehensive control of blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Follow-up to the DCCT and UKPDS studies – In response to the findings of the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, which continues to monitor DCCT patients over time, and the UKPDS 10-year follow up study, the NDEP encouraged early identification and management of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes to reduce eye, kidney, nerve, heart, and blood vessel complications. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study and Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Dude Ramps Up An Innovative Diabetes Awareness Campaign

The Diabetes Dude Ramps Up An Innovative Diabetes Awareness Campaign

THE Diabetes Dude Ramps Up an Innovative Diabetes Awareness Campaign The Flamingo Flock diabetes awareness campaign is the brainchild of 9-year-old Noah Brokmeier, The Diabetes Dude. Noahs blue flamingos are landing on lawns nationwide and appearing at big events like the Boston Marathon. Wherever they go, the birds pose for pictures, which are then posted on Noahs website, www.thediabetesdude.com . The location of the birds is also flagged on his official flamingo tracking map, to show the progress and growth of the campaign. Noahs involvement with diabetes education has grown out of his experiences as a child living with type 1 diabetes. In the three years since he was diagnosed with the disease at the age of six, Noah and his family have remained focused on the idea that you may have diabetes, but diabetes does not have you. It has not been easy. According to his father, Tim, a US Navy Veteran, the first year after diagnosis was a difficult one for Noah and the family. A child who loved sports, Noahs activities became limited by the need to constantly monitor his blood sugar levels. Participation in many of his favorite sports was curtailed because they conflicted with his scheduled mealtimes or insulin shots. Sleepovers and parties were too difficult to manage. Noah didnt go out much anymore and he didnt talk about his condition to anyone but his family. Noahs diagnosis was also a life changing experience for his family. His parents became nurses, dietitians and watchdogs injecting insulin, measuring, weighing and monitoring every bite of food. They were on guard every minute for further threats to Noahs health. All the kids were changed, recalls Noahs father. They went from having a big brother in the house to feeling like they had to watch over him, protect him, Continue reading >>

The Unite For Diabetes Campaign: Overcoming Constraints To Find A Global Policy Solution

The Unite For Diabetes Campaign: Overcoming Constraints To Find A Global Policy Solution

The Unite for Diabetes campaign: Overcoming constraints to find a global policy solution 2Hubert Professor of Global Health and Epidemiology, Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road NE Atlanta, Georgia, 30322, USA 1Associate, MATRIX Public Health Solutions, Inc., 85 Willow Street Suite 3, New Haven, CT, 06511, USA 2Hubert Professor of Global Health and Epidemiology, Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road NE Atlanta, Georgia, 30322, USA Received 2008 Jan 14; Accepted 2008 Feb 19. Copyright 2008 Siegel and Narayan; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Despite the fact that diabetes and other non-communicable diseases represent a significant proportion of the global burden of disease, proportionate global action has not occurred. A 2003 article reported on global constraints to the implementation of effective policies to curb non-communicable disease epidemics. These constraints include a lack of global advocacy, insufficient attention from funding agencies and governments, partnerships and interactions, capacity and resources, and global norms and standards, as well as orientation of health services to acute care. Building on these ideas, this paper will review the progress that has been made with regards to each constraint, focusing on the International Diabetes Federation's Unite for Diabetes campaign and United Nations resolution on diabetes to show how this event dr Continue reading >>

Idea Diabetes Safety Campaign | Abcd (diabetes Care) Ltd

Idea Diabetes Safety Campaign | Abcd (diabetes Care) Ltd

A drive to improve the care of people with diabetes admitted to Leicesters hospitals has been launched. Two initiatives have been set up to help doctors at the University Hospital of Leicester NHS Trust improve their understanding and knowledge about diabetes management and insulin safety in hospital. One of these (Inpatient Diabetes Education through Animation IDEA) involves a series of short cartoons based on real life scenarios, developed by trainee doctor, Sowmya Gururaj. The short clips are aimed at helping healthcare professionals treat patients who have diabetes and are admitted to hospital. Dr Gururaj carried out research looking at serious diabetes incidents and identifying recurring themes. The most common errors included wrong insulin prescriptions, delays in administration and incorrect doses. The videos focus on key areas identified where mistakes have been made, with the aim of learning from these experiences, improving care and patient experience. The animations can be found on YouTube ( ) and Vimeo ( ). Diabetes consultant Kath Higgins, head of the diabetes service at Leicester Hospitals, said: We knew there was a need to develop an innovative and memorable teaching tool which would help to share learning and address training and education gaps. Diabetes is complex and needs to be managed properly. If a patient is admitted to hospital with another condition, then their diabetes can sometimes get overlooked. Review of incidents within the trust showed that many of the errors that occurred when it came to inpatient diabetes management could have been easily avoided. We also discovered that there is a lack of confidence and knowledge among some trainee doctors when managing patients in hospital who have diabetes. So far, the feedback weve had for the anima Continue reading >>

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