diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Butter Or Margarine

Diabetics And Butter

Diabetics And Butter

If you have diabetes, following a healthy diet is one of the most important steps you can take to control blood sugar levels. A healthy diet also lowers your risk for cardiovascular disease, which is higher when you have diabetes. Butter is a source of unhealthy fats, which can contribute to heart disease, so it should not be a regular component of your healthy diet for diabetes management. Video of the Day Obesity is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, and the majority of individuals with the condition are overweight or obese. If you are overweight and have high blood sugar levels, losing weight can help you control your blood sugar levels. With 102 calories per tablespoon, butter can contribute to weight gain or interfere with efforts to lose weight. As a healthier option, take smaller portions of butter or switch to a small amount of an unsaturated fat option, such as olive oil. Avoid Butter for a Healthier Heart Diabetes increases your risk for heart disease, and a healthy diet supports heart health as well as a healthy weight and lower blood sugar levels. Butter is a poor dietary choice because each tablespoon contains 7.3 grams of saturated fat, or nearly 37 percent of the daily value -- a total of 20 grams of saturated fat daily -- based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Saturated fat can raise your cholesterol levels and increase your risk for heart disease, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Plant-based oils are lower in saturated fat, making them healthier choices than butter. Your blood sugar levels rise after you eat foods with carbohydrates, and individuals with diabetes must carefully monitor the quantity of carbohydrates they consume and the timing. High-glycemic carbohydrates can spike your blood sugar levels, while a low-glycemic d Continue reading >>

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?

The world of nutrition is often confusing, even for dietitians and other nutrition experts. Debates (and bickering) rage on about which diet is best for weight loss, how much carbohydrate a person with diabetes should have, and what kind of fat is best to eat. It’s not so easy these days to choose a spread for your morning toast or your baked potato. Years ago, folks had pretty much two choices: butter and margarine. Today, we have butter, light butter, whipped butter, stick margarine, vegetable oil spread, margarine with phytosterols, margarine with yogurt, and vegan margarine (just to name a few). How do you possibly choose? First things first Most people know that butter and margarine are not the same. There are distinct differences between the two, even though they’re often used for the same purpose. Butter • Made from churned cream (so it’s an animal product) • Contains cholesterol and saturated fat (1 tablespoon has roughly 30 milligrams of cholesterol and 7 grams of saturated fat) • Does not contain trans fats (an unhealthy type of fat formed when oils are partially hydrogenated) • Contains vitamins A, D, E, and K • Good choice for baking • Healthier options are whipped butter or butter blended with canola or olive oil • “European-style” or “rich” butter contains even more fat and saturated fat than regular butter Margarine • Made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil • Some brands contain trans fat (1 tablespoon of stick margarine contains 3 grams of trans fat) • Contains less saturated fat than butter (1 tablespoon has approximately 2–3 grams of saturated fat) and no cholesterol • Tub and liquid margarines are healthier than stick margarines • Some brands are fortified with plant stanols or sterols Continue reading >>

Butter Vs. Margarine: Which Is Most Healthful?

Butter Vs. Margarine: Which Is Most Healthful?

The debate about whether margarine or butter is best for your health is ongoing. In this article, we discuss the pros and cons of margarine and butter and ask which is best for our heart. Unfortunately, there is no clear-cut answer. Butter is a dairy product made by churning cream or milk to separate the solid components from the liquid. Butter is commonly used in cooking, baking, and as a spread. Margarine was developed as a substitute for butter and is made from plant-based oils, such as canola oil, palm fruit oil, and soybean oil. Heart health is a common concern; as such, making the best dietary choices is an important issue. Here we will help decide whether butter or margarine is best. The choice is really between trans fats (margarine) or saturated fats (butter). Saturated fats raise bad cholesterol (less so than trans fats) and do not affect HDL. Butter vs. margarine: How to choose The decision of whether to choose butter or margarine is dependent on the individual and their specific dietary needs. Maintaining proper nutrition is a personal undertaking. What makes sense for one person might not be in the best interest of the next. What's the difference between butter and margarine? The most important difference is that butter contains saturated fat and many margarines contain trans fats. Trans fat raises LDL (bad) cholesterol significantly while lowering HDL (good) cholesterol. Saturated fat also raises LDL (bad) cholesterol, but less than trans fats, and does not affect HDL. There is not a truly healthful option when it comes to butter or margarine, but the following tips can help make choosing the best butter or margarine easier: Look for margarine with the least amount of trans fat - preferably 0 grams - and be sure to check the ingredient label for partially Continue reading >>

Butter Vs Margarine - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Butter Vs Margarine - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Over the last few months I have switched to butter after being told the risks of the synthetic content of Margarine.I have type 2 Diabetes and I have not had any sort of normal readings for sometime (Min 11.0 mmol and upto 21mml). I realise you have to moderate your intake of these completely and I have alternatives that I do use eg advocado or olive oil spreads. However, which is better for the Diabetic diet - butter or marg? I found your post amusing. Margarine was originally manufactured to fatten turkeys. When it killed the turkeys, the people who had put all the money into the research wanted a payback so they put their heads together to figure out what to do with this product to get their money back.It was a white substance with no food appeal so they added the yellow coloring and sold it to people to use in place of butter. Yum, yum. Butter, on the hand, has been around for centuries. Read this link on butter vs margarine Continue reading >>

Is Margarine Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Margarine Safe For People With Diabetes?

Nutritional recommendations always seem to be changing. Oneyear we’re advised to switch from butter to margarine. A year later, we learn that margarine is worse for us than butter. With all the conflicting information, it’s not surprising that many people are often confused. Margarine and the Trans Fat Bad Rap Margarines are notoriously high in trans fats. Onceit was discovered that trans fats are as bad for youas saturated fats (if not worse), margarine got a badrap. Manufacturers responded to these concerns bydeveloping trans fat free margarines, but they had toreplace this emulsifying ingredient with a long list ofother ingredients. But are these ingredients safe? Is butter still thebetter alternative? The problem is that the body treats trans fat as if itwere a saturated fat. Trans fats have adverse actionson lipid profiles because they raise LDL (“bad”)cholesterol and decrease HDL (“good”) cholesterol.A study published in the Journal of Nutrition alsofound that trans fats negatively affect plasmamarkers of inflammation and reduce endothelialfunction, effects that are associated with an increasedcardiovascular disease risk. This is particularly important for people withdiabetes. Since they already have an elevated riskof cardiovascular disease, diabetics need to takeprecautions to ensure that all controllable aspects ofhealth are practiced. There is no recommended intake for trans fats; however, there is no requirement for trans fats in the diet, either, and it is suggested that our intake of trans fats be as low as possible. Butter or Margarine? Butter is a more natural product than margarine, composed of onlyone or two ingredients (cream and sometimes salt). Trans fat freemargarines may have little or no hydrogenated oils, but they docontain many natur Continue reading >>

What Margarine ? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

What Margarine ? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am newly diagnosed Type 2 and the first question to mind is which is the best margarine from the supermarket. I am sure there will be hundred more questions but I must get this settled in my head Hi Robgrime. I see you're on diet only atr the moment which is good. In which case, your key issue is getting your Blood sugar levels (BGs) down to acceptable numbers. Your choice of margarine won't make any difference to that at all. Your nurse/doctor probably told you to cut down on fats, and while saturated fats are apparently not good for any of us, they don't affect BGs. That's why you'll find most of us on here concentrate on reducing the things that DO raise our BGs; that's the starchy carbohydrates. Here's a link to some basic info to get you going. Do keep coming back with the questions though! I am newly diagnosed Type 2 and the first question to mind is which is the best margarine from the supermarket. I am sure there will be hundred more questions but I must get this settled in my head I hate to assume anything but I presume by margarine you mean the various spreads that are around, many of them are claimed to be of benefit in lowering cholesterol levels. However, some of the claims made are rather dubious. Taste is something that comes into it as well. I like various spreads but it is really personal choice. Here is a link to information from the UK margarine and spreads association which might be of use to you. Personally I don't use any spreads preferring to go with a good quality butter used sparingly. Has had no effect on either my cholesterol levels or blood sugar levels. My choice. If you are looking to use one of these spreads to reduce Continue reading >>

The Butter Vs. Margarine Debate When You Have Diabetes

The Butter Vs. Margarine Debate When You Have Diabetes

By Megrette Fletcher M.Ed, RD, CDE and Michelle May, M.D. Authors of Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes In our last post, “Is Butter Bad? Is Margarine Better? “, we introduced three important questions to ask when deciding what to eat: What do I want? What do I need? What do I have? We also explored a “liking scale” to help you consider how much your preference for a particular food will affect your decision. Of course, it’s not enough to just think about what you like; you also want to consider what you need. What Do I Need? While awareness of your preferences is important, don’t stop there! Next think about what your body needs by considering questions like: What are my health issues? What is my family history? What are my goals? What else am I going to eat now? What else have I eaten today? What else am I likely to eat today? How will my choices affect my blood glucose level? With prediabetes and diabetes, health considerations are particularly important because having diabetes is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis. When you have diabetes, you are two to four times more likely to suffer from heart disease and stroke than someone without diabetes. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes will die from these causes. While these are frightening statistics, awareness and knowledge empower you to minimize your personal risk. What Can You Do? Of course, keeping your blood glucose in the target range is important. In addition, you’ll want to manage your other risk factors-don’t smoke, manage your weight, and control your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. We promised to look at the butter vs. margarine debate so we’ll focus on cholesterol levels. As we explained in chapter 14 of Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Continue reading >>

Butter Is Healthier Than Margarine: New Study Finds Saturated Fat Might Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Butter Is Healthier Than Margarine: New Study Finds Saturated Fat Might Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

/display/newscorpaustralia.com/Web/NewsNetwork/Finance - syndicated/ Butter has been getting a bad rap for a long time. But a new study suggests its been unfairly targeted.Source:istock THE verdict is in on the battle between butter and margarine. Your parents and grandparents might have been told different things over the years, but a new study has put to rest the beliefs that have abounded since the 1950s that butter, full of saturated fats, is making us fatter and more prone to heart disease. The study , authored by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, Dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts in Boston, declared butter a neutral food. Basically, this suggests it may not be bad for you, but its also not yet for the superfood list. The study dispelled myths that have been capitalised on by the food industry for the last 60 odd years and found that there is no link between consuming butter and an increased risk of heart disease or stroke. It actually found that butter might play a role in slightly preventing Type 2 diabetes. Twenty years ago this might have been considered an unhealthy breakfast, due to its saturated fat content. But butter and eggs are back!Source:istock The researchers analysed nine eligible studies representing 636,151 unique individuals with a total of 6.5 million person-years of follow up. The findings do not support a need for major emphasis in dietary guidelines on either increasing or decreasing butter consumption, the researchers wrote. So where did the myths about butter begin? In 1955 at the World Health Organisation in Geneva, Ancel Keys offered what became known as his lipid hypothesis , claiming dietary fat raised cholesterol, subsequently increased heart disease. Keys initially pointed the finger at all dietary fat as the Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Ask An Expert: Butter Vs. Margarine Which Is Better For You?

Ask An Expert: Butter Vs. Margarine Which Is Better For You?

Ask an Expert: Butter vs. margarine which is better for you? Ask an Expert: Butter vs. margarine which is better for you? Q: Years ago, I switched from butter to margarine to reduce my cholesterol intake. Now I hear that margarine contains something even worse than cholesterol trans fat so Im thinking about switching back to butter. Weighing the pros and cons, which one really is the healthier choice: butter or margarine? Answer provided by Terese Scollard, M.B.A., R.D., L.D., regional clinical nutrition manager for Providence Nutrition Services: Butter contains a lot of artery-clogging saturated fat, and margarine contains an unhealthy combination of saturated and trans fats, so the healthiest choice is to skip both of them and use liquid oils, such as olive, canola and safflower oil, instead. However, even dietitians understand that some foods benefit greatly from a little buttery flavor; it wouldnt be realistic to suggest that you give up butter and margarine altogether. If you want to use one or the other on occasion, margarine is the healthier choice overall as long as you choose the right type of margarine. Margarine comes in stick, tub and liquid forms now, and not all of them are created equal. Some stick margarines may be no better than butter in terms of their health effects. The best choices are soft or liquid margarines that have no (or very little) trans fat and less than 3 grams of saturated fat per serving. Understanding the pros and cons of each option can help you make informed choices about what to use and how often (or seldom) to use it. (Source: Food and Drug Administration; calories and info on canola oil added) Pros: Butter is generally natural, made from just one or two ingredients: cream, and sometimes salt. Cons: Cream also known as milk fat co Continue reading >>

Butter Or Margarine?

Butter Or Margarine?

Butter versus margarine. Given the amount of passion and controversy this topic raises, you’d think we were talking about the presidential race. Undoubtedly, you have an opinion based on what you use. But what’s the real deal behind the debate? Butter, defined I don’t think you’d get much of an argument about the taste of butter. There’s nothing quite like melted butter on an ear of corn, a bowl of popcorn, or a slice of straight-out-of-the-oven bread. But we know that taste doesn’t necessary equate with health. Butter is a dairy product that’s made by churning cream or milk to separate the solids (fat and protein) from the liquid (buttermilk). By regulation, butter must be at least 80% fat, about 16% water, and 3% milk solids. Most of the butter we eat is made from cow’s milk, but butter can be made from sheep’s, goat’s, buffalo’s, or other mammal’s milk, as well. There are different types of butter, including: • sweet cream butter: made from pasteurized fresh cream • raw butter: unpasteurized • whipped butter: contains added air, making it lower in fat than regular butter • light butter: contains added air and water; has about half the fat as regular butter • grass-fed butter: made from the milk of cows who are fed grass, not grain • cultured butter: contains healthy bacteria (probiotics) • ghee: clarified butter Coloring and salt may be added to butter. Unsalted butter is available, too. Margarine, defined Margarine is used as a substitute for butter, and it’s made from a variety of vegetable oils, such as soy, canola, and palm oil. Other oils may be used, too, including flaxseed and fish oils. By regulation, margarine must contain at least 80% fat. Margarines that are lower in fat must be called “soft margarine spreads.” I Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Diet: Butter Versus Margarine

Diabetes & Diet: Butter Versus Margarine

The great debate has raged on for years. Which spread is better for you? It is butter, which is free of unhealthy trans fats. Or is it margarine which has lower saturated fats and contains no cholesterol. Both are soft, spreadable, and delicious on toast. Yet, each comes from very different origins. What is Margarine? A butter alternative, margarine is made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil to thicken and solidify it. This makes a spreadable product used as a topping on bread, to pan fry food, or even as a fat in baked recipes. It has long been touted as a healthier option to butter because it lacks cholesterol. However, recent research has led the medical industry to put less emphasis on cholesterol in foods and more on saturated fats and trans fats. Margarine doesn’t contain any saturated fats, but some margarine brands do contain trans fats. What is Butter? This animal product is the fat that is separated from cream during the churning process. Most butter on the market comes from cows. This product was not recommended for a long time due to containing about seven grams of saturated fat per tablespoon and 30 milligrams of cholesterol per tablespoon. - Advertisement - Doctors are easing up a little bit on the ban these days. There are healthier options available, such as butter blended with olive oil or canola, and whipped butter. Plus, the idea is to have less than 10% of your diet be saturated fats. This is about 20 grams of saturated fats per day. Which is Better? If you eat a lot of toast, you may want to stick with margarine. Just look for a brand without trans fats and with the lowest amount of saturated fat you can find. You might also want to look for tub margarine as this is fewer calories. Whipped butter is also much healthier compared to sticks of butte Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Despite the fact that health professionals for years have recommended reducing its intake, butter intake is still quite high, at 23 sticks per American per year. Its creamy delicious goodness just has not gone away. But is butter making a comeback in the nutrition science world? Is it really not as bad as we once thought? Although it was vilified in the 1980’s and 1990’s, has it been pardoned from its unhealthy label? History Butter has always been a staple in the American diet. In the 1920’s, Americans consumed approximately 72 sticks (18 pounds) of butter per year. The Great Depression hit and then World War II, with these events causing a steep decline in butter consumption with a concurrent rise in margarine use. Butter continued to decrease in the American diet throughout the 1950’s – 1980’s. At that point, the role of butter stayed fairly steady at around 20 sticks (5 pounds) per year. Rising intake just recently started in the 2010’s decade. Nutritional Content Butter is 100% fat, meaning all of the calories that butter provides are in the form of fat. One tablespoon of butter contains 102 calories, all from the 11 grams of total fat. Looking at the fat content more closely, that tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat and 3 grams of monounsaturated fat, as well as approximately 31 mg of cholesterol. Is Butter Recommended for Diabetics? For years, saturated fats in butter and other foods were discouraged because of the strong association with cardiovascular diseases. Eating a diet high in saturated fat raises blood lipids, increasing the likelihood that arteries will be occluded by the lipids and eventually lead to serious complications such as heart attack and stroke. This is a known scientifically proven fact. The American Heart Ass Continue reading >>

Butter Vs Margarine: Which Is Best For Diabetics?

Butter Vs Margarine: Which Is Best For Diabetics?

Years ago, margarine was typically made with partially hydrogenated oil, explains nutritionist Christine Avanti. "The older margarine spreads were unhealthful because of the hydrogenation process," she explains. "But fortunately the newer spreads are much more heart healthy." Back then researchers noted that butter's high saturated fat content could raise a person's blood cholesterol, according to an article in Diabetes Forecast. Nutrition experts thus recommended margarine, until further research found that the trans fat content of margarine meant it was an even more unhealthy product than butter. Trans fats are made when liquid oils are turned into solids through hydrogenation. Now there's a variety of no and low trans fat margarines, and it these are more heart-healthy than butter after all, according to Diabetes Forecast. Since those with diabetes are told to choose foods that are low in fat in order to protect the heart and blood vessels, it's a good idea to minimize intake of saturated fat. And it's also good to eliminate another culprit: trans fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. To keep this unhealthy fat out of the diet, it's recommended to cut back on stick margarine, commercial baked goods like cookies and doughnuts, and packaged snack foods like some crackers. If in doubt, read the label. Suggestions for making wise "spread" choices: Look for a soft margarine in a tub that lists a liquid oil like safflower, soybean, canola or corn as the first ingredient, recommends the American Diabetes Association. Look for special cholesterol-lowering margarines, says the ADA. These margarines are made with plant sterols or plant stanols, explains the ADA, which keep cholesterol from being absorbed. Having two or three tablespoons of a cholesterol-lowering Continue reading >>

Fats And Oils - Diabetes Queensland

Fats And Oils - Diabetes Queensland

Fats have the most energy (kilojoules) of all the nutrients, soit is important to moderate intake as too much fat can makemanaging your weight difficult. Saturated fat and trans fats are the ones you really have towatch out for as they increase the risk of heart disease byincreasing LDL (bad) cholesterol and lowering high densitylipoprotein (HDL) (good) cholesterol. On the other hand, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatsreduce the risk of heart disease by lowering LDL (bad) cholesteroland increasing HDL (good) cholesterol. Butter and margarine are made from fat. Avoid using butter,copha, lard and ghee. Instead choose a poly or monounsaturatedmargarine such as olive, canola or sunflower spreads. aim for saturated fat less than 1/3 of total fat Not all oils are the same, so no wonder people get confused. Agood rule of thumb is to use cooking spray in place of oils as youuse less fat overall. Don't fall into the trap of thinkinglighter oils are better for you - lighter oils are lighter incolour, but not necessarily any lighter in fat. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes