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Diabetes Breathing

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

Breathing Retraining For Diabetes: Reduce Insulin Intake To Avoid Hypoglycemia

Breathing Retraining For Diabetes: Reduce Insulin Intake To Avoid Hypoglycemia

Module 8A. Restrictions, side effects, limits, and temporary contraindications (Learning the Buteyko method by modules) This video features Dr. Artour Rakhimov who explains why reducing insulin intake is important for people with diabetes when starting breathing retraining or doing Buteyko exercises: Diabetes Treatment and Insulin Reduction. Breathing retraining and the Buteyko method are great tools to treat diabetes. We had students with insulin-dependent diabetes, and our observations are in complete agreement with clinical observations of Soviet doctors who succesfully applied the Buteyko technique on hundreds of their patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The results are the same: with up to a certain number for the morning CP (body oxygen test), there is no need for insulin or other medication since blood glucose control is normal naturally (within medical norms). This number (goal) is provided in the bonus content below. Here is a web page that summarizes major effects of breathing retraining on diabetes. It is common that those practicing reduced breathing and breathing exercises increase body oxygenation (that we measure using the CP or body oxygen test). Hence, any medications (insulin included) that help to reduce blood sugar can potentially cause problems. Let us consider when and why. If diabetics use the same insulin dose Intensive breathing exercise sessions and quick growth in body oxygenation sharply increase the organism’s sensitivity to circulating blood insulin and increase production of its own insulin due to better perfusion and oxygenation of the pancreas in people with diabetes. This effect can happen during and after a single breathing session (as fast as in 5-10 minutes) or as an accumulative effect due to a fast growth in the body oxygen Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

This content is created by Healthgrades and brought to you by an advertising sponsor. More This content is created or selected by the Healthgrades editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to the Healthgrades medical review process for accuracy, balance and objectivity. The content is not edited or otherwise influenced by the advertisers appearing on this page except with the possible suggestion of the broad topic area. For more information, read the Healthgrades advertising policy. A diabetes specialist, called an endocrinologist, has the right skills and insight to help you stay in control of your diabetes. Your feet. Your heart. Your kidneys. When you think of the body parts affected by diabetes, these are the ones that likely come to mind. But diabetes also affects another part of your body. And its one you use every second of your life: your lungs. If you have diabetes, youare more likely to have certain lung conditions. Diabetes also has an impact on lung function, or how well you breathe. A study published in Diabetes Care compared the health records of more than 1.8 million California residents with and without diabetes. The research found that adults with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes are: 22% more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 54% more likely to have pulmonary fibrosis, a disease in which scarring in the lungs interferes with your ability to breathe Nearly twice as likely to have been hospitalized for pneumonia If you have type 2 diabetes, youhave decreased lung function compared with people who dont have diabetes. Lung function is a measure of how well youre breathing. It also refers to how well your lungs deliver oxygen to your body. If you have type 2 diabetes, youtend to have 3% to 10% Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing

Kussmaul Breathing

Not to be confused with Kussmaul's sign. Graph showing the Kussmaul breathing and other pathological breathing patterns. Kussmaul breathing is a deep and labored breathing pattern often associated with severe metabolic acidosis, particularly diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) but also kidney failure. It is a form of hyperventilation, which is any breathing pattern that reduces carbon dioxide in the blood due to increased rate or depth of respiration. In metabolic acidosis, breathing is first rapid and shallow[1] but as acidosis worsens, breathing gradually becomes deep, labored and gasping. It is this latter type of breathing pattern that is referred to as Kussmaul breathing. Terminology[edit] Adolph Kussmaul, who introduced the term, referred to breathing when metabolic acidosis was sufficiently severe for the respiratory rate to be abnormal or reduced.[2] This definition is also followed by several other sources,[3][4] including for instance Merriam-Webster, which defines Kussmaul breathing as "abnormally slow deep respiration characteristic of air hunger and occurring especially in acidotic states".[5] Other sources, however, use the term Kussmaul respiration also when acidosis is less severe, in which case breathing is rapid.[4][6] Note that Kussmaul breathing occurs only in advanced stages of acidosis, and is fairly rarely reached. In less severe cases of acidosis, rapid, shallow breathing is seen. Kussmaul breathing is a kind of very deep, gasping, desperate breathing. Occasionally, medical literature refers to any abnormal breathing pattern in acidosis as Kussmaul breathing; however, this is inaccurate. History[edit] Kussmaul breathing is named for Adolph Kussmaul,[2] the 19th century German doctor who first noted it among patients with advanced diabetes mellitus. Kussm Continue reading >>

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

Kussmaul breathing is a deep, labored breathing pattern that indicates that the body or organs have become too acidic. The body is constantly doing work to maintain an average temperature and neutral blood acidity. To make sure this balance happens; the kidneys and cells rely on bases or buffers, chemical compounds that bind with hydrogen ions. Disruptions to these compounds cause Kussmaul breathing, which is typically associated with conditions that cause metabolic disturbances, such as kidney failure and diabetes. Contents of this article: Kussmaul breathing is a type of hyperventilation that is the lung's emergency response to acidosis. Kussmaul breathing causes a labored, deeper breathing rate. It is most commonly associated with conditions that cause metabolic acidosis, particularly diabetes. Because Kussmaul breathing is a sign of severe metabolic acidosis, which is a life-threatening condition, hospitalization is usually necessary. What is Kussmaul breathing? When the body produces or ingests too much acid; or the kidneys or lungs are failing, blood acid levels increase. If the blood becomes too acidic, acidosis occurs, and the body takes action to restore the imbalance. By using deeper, longer breaths, the lungs can expel more acidic carbon dioxide (C02) than normal. The condition takes its name from Adolph Kussmaul, the German physician who first described the breathing pattern in 1874. Symptoms As a type of hyperventilation, some people describe Kussmaul breathing as panicked breathing, where someone appears to be gasping for breath. The deep, powerful breathing associated with Kussmaul breathing often causes inhalation and exhalation to become more evident and loud. Some compare the sound to exaggerated sighing. Symptoms of acidosis Before the deep and labore Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Pulmonary Function And Sleep Breathing: Two New Targets For Type 2 Diabetes Care

Pulmonary Function And Sleep Breathing: Two New Targets For Type 2 Diabetes Care

Pulmonary Function and Sleep Breathing: Two New Targets for Type 2 Diabetes Care Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, Institut de Recerca Biomdica de Lleida, Universitat de Lleida, Spain Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metablicas Asociadas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain Correspondence and Reprint Requests: Rafael Sim, MD, PhD, Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Vall dHebron, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Unit, VHIR, Passeig de la Vall dHebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metablicas Asociadas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Vall dHebron, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Unit, Vall dHebron Institut de Recerca, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, Spain Search for other works by this author on: Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine Department of Human Physiology and Sleep Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef afrik University, Slovak Republic Search for other works by this author on: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, Institut de Recerca Biomdica de Lleida, Universitat de Lleida, Spain Search for other works by this author on: Respiratory Department, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova-Santa Mara, Institut de Recerca Biomdica de Lleida, Universitat de Lleida, Spain Continue reading >>

Original Article Pulmonary Function Changes In Diabetic Lung

Original Article Pulmonary Function Changes In Diabetic Lung

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is a chronic and debilitating disease. Its complications give rise to micro and macrovascular diseases which affect eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, nerves and also lungs. There may be a relationship between diabetes and reduced lung function, so this study was designed to evaluate the impairment of lung function on spirometry among diabetic patients. To study the effect of diabetes mellitus on the evolution of respiratory function parameters. Hundred subjects were enrolled in the study, 30 patients with type I, another 30 patients with type II and 40 subjects were controls. Mean age was 42.78 ± 3.14 years, 45 were males and 55 were females. Mean HbA1C was 8.9 ± 1.1%. 22 patients with diabetes duration from 5 to 10 years, 38 patients with a duration of more than 10 years. Spirometric tests were done for all groups by computerized Spirometry with six parameters {Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1), Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), Forced expiratory volume in first second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), Peak expiratory flow rate (FEFR 25–75) and Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)}. There was a predominant reduction in all the Spirometric parameters of diabetic patients toward the restrictive pattern as there was significant deterioration in DLCO in comparison with healthy controls. FVC (p < 0.01), and FEV1/FVC% (p < 0.001) were significantly lower in type1 diabetic patients in comparison to those of type II. Impairment of lung functions was obvious with a longer duration of diabetes. Diabetes is associated with a significant impaired pulmonary function in a restrictive pattern as compared to non diabetics. The pulmonary function impairment was found to be more marked with diabetic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Cause And Treatment: Body Oxygen And How To Breathe

Diabetes Mellitus Cause And Treatment: Body Oxygen And How To Breathe

For more than 500 Russian medical doctors and thousands of their patients, the cause of diabetes mellitus is known. Each and every person with diabetes mellitus is a heavy breather, while breathing normalization reverses diabetes fast and naturally. This fact was confirmed by all five Western clinical studies that measured minute ventilation in patients with diabetes mellitus. All our students with diabetes, who normalized their breath, reversed all their symptoms and stopped taking any medication (insulin, etc.). If you click on the image, you can find a table that provides all details related to these medical studies. As a result of heavy breathing, people with diabetes mellitus have reduced blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery to vital organs and extremities of the body. According to numerous medical studies, tissue hypoxia causes poor blood glucose control and delayed insulin regulation with possible increased insulin resistance (see clinical research related to molecuular causes of diabetes mellitus). This is not a surprise since O2 is so fundamental for normal cell and organ function. Furthermore, many other chronic diseases (such as cancer, heart disease, and cystic fibrosis) and complications of diabetes mellitus have the same cause: low body oxygenation. Heavy and deep breathing in people with diabetes mellitus causes excessive CO2 losses. Hypocapnia (reduced CO2) in blood causes spasm of blood vessels and the reduced Bohr effect (less oxygen is released in tissues by red blood cells). Overbreathing decreases oxygen delivery and causes the generation of free radicals, chronic fatigue, poor sleep and many other effects. The presence of chest breathing and mouth breathing are additional common factors that worsen oxygen transport to cells and lead to more sev Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

So, what’s it like to have diabetes and asthma? Well, diabetes is a condition where the blood has high levels of sugar in it. It is normally caused by the body producing insufficient insulin. Symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst, increased urination and blurred vision. Asthma is a condition that causes patients to have trouble breathing, because of the swelling of the lungs airways. Symptoms of asthma include shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, wheezing and coughing. So, mix these two together and that is what it’s like to have both diabetes and asthma. However, there is some good news if you have one of them, because there is some light at the end of this tunnel. Is There a Link Between Asthma and Diabetes? When it comes to asthma and diabetes, is there a link between the two? Well, we discussed what the two are and their symptoms above, so now let’s look in to the connection between the two. The answer is that people who have diabetes do have higher rates of having asthma. These patients do tend to have a hard time maintaining their blood glucose levels and keeping their asthma under control. Further reading: Throughout the years, various studies have shown that people who have diabetes that is not under control or is poorly maintained, are the ones who are at a higher risk of developing asthma, because their lung functioning seems to be weaker than those that have diabetes that is properly controlled or maintained. On the reverse side, these studies also concluded that people who suffer from asthma are at a higher risk of developing diabetes and need to be careful. Reasons Steroids and Diabetes Don’t Mix Steroids are used in asthma patients to reduce the inflammation and swelling of the airways of the lungs. The most common steroids are cor Continue reading >>

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Tweet The respiratory system is the system of organs that allow the body to take in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide, this process is known as gaseous exchange. We generally breathe between 12 and 20 times a minute. There are a number of complications of diabetes that can negatively affect our breathing. Parts of the respiratory system The following parts of the body make up the respiratory system: Mouth and nose Trachea (windpipe) Lungs Diaphragm How the respiratory system works Breathing is usually initiated by contraction of the diaphragm, a muscle which separates the chest cavity from the abdomen. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious Continue reading >>

An Easy Breathing Exercise That Assists Diabetic Patients

An Easy Breathing Exercise That Assists Diabetic Patients

An Easy Breathing Exercise That Assists Diabetic Patients Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either due to inadequate insulin production, or due to the irresponsive behavior of the bodys cells to insulin or both. Patients with diabetes generally suffer from polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst), polyphagia (increased hunger), fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, numbness and tingling in hands and feet. It is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In 2013, it was estimated that over 382 million people across the world had diabetes (Williams textbook of endocrinology). There are two reasons why diabetes occur: either because the body does not produce insulin (Approx. 10% of patients) or the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function (Approx. 90% of patients) As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly. Control and cure diabetes through Nitaai Breathing Deep corrective breathing exercise called Nitaai Breathing has a significant ability to control and cure diabetes. Cardiologists Robert Schneider, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.B.M.R., and Csar Molina, M.D., F.A.C.C. studied the effects of deep breathing exercise and meditation on Type 2 diabetes patients. Their research shows that corrective deep breathing and meditation lowers insulin response during the initial stages of the disease. Cortisol, adrenaline and non-adrenalin the stress hormones affect insulin and glucose levels in the blood and since corrective deep breathing (Nitaai Breathing) lowers stress and helps in metabolism, so the insulin and glucose levels get re-balanced. Cortisol level mana Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

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