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Diabetes Breath Smells

Banishing Bad Breath

Banishing Bad Breath

Stinky breath. Halitosis. Fetor oris. Whatever the name, it’s something that no one wants. Bad breath can be mildly annoying (as well as socially upsetting), and while it may be traced back to the 13-garlic-clove chicken dinner you ate last night, it can also indicate something more serious, especially if you have diabetes. Read on to learn more about halitosis, its causes, and what you can do to combat it. What is bad breath? If your breath smells bad to you or to others, you have bad breath, otherwise known as halitosis. We’ve probably all had it at some time or another, perhaps related to a food or beverage that we’ve consumed, or possibly we’ve woken up in the morning with what I call “dragon breath.” At its best, bad breath is unpleasant (to you and to others) and can certainly be embarrassing (who wants bad breath when you’re on a job interview or a first date?). Our society deems bad breath as something to be banished, too: just walk down the aisle of the pharmacy and witness the mouthwashes, toothpastes, and other potions to rid yourself of this condition. Unfortunately, most of these products work temporarily and, in some cases, can actually worsen the condition. How do you know if you have bad breath? Surprising as it may seem, you may not know if you have halitosis. The best way to check your breath is to ask a spouse, family member, or close friend to check out your mouth odor and let you know. If no one is around to help you out, lick your wrist, let it dry, and then smell it. If your wrist smells bad, you have bad breath. What causes bad breath? There are many potential causes of bad breath, ranging from food to oral hygiene to health conditions. Here’s a run-down of the main culprits: Food: Food particles that get stuck in your mouth and t Continue reading >>

Acetone Breath And Diabetes

Acetone Breath And Diabetes

My husband is 58 and has type 2 diabetes. Two days ago his breath started to smell very strongly, and he was suddenly very tired and slightly nauseated. He recovered from this, and the smell went away. I've read about acetone breath in diabetics. Do you think that is what he had? What's the cause? — Alice, Connecticut Acetone breath in diabetics is caused by an excess production of acetone. Acetone, hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate are ketones, byproducts of fat metabolism. When the body does not have enough insulin (as is the case in people with diabetes), a hormone that is key in glucose metabolism, it instead uses fatty acids as an alternative source of energy, and ketones are the result of this process. Ketones are also produced during a fasting state or when consuming a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet. Ketones can cause nausea, vomiting, and fatigue. But I am concerned that your husband might be experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a serious and life-threatening condition. I suggest that you check your husband’s sugar level at the time you notice his acetone breath and contact his doctor for further advice. It is also quite likely that his acetone breath might be a result of missing meals. Learn more in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes & Bad Breath

The Link Between Diabetes & Bad Breath

People with bad breath are essentially ashamed of their condition. They avoid talking to others for fear that they may be ridiculed or laughed at. This can cause some serious self esteem issues to these people in the long run. In most cases, bad breath is caused by environmental and lifestyle factors. The way they accomplish their oral hygiene regimens, the food that they eat and the beverages that they drink often times can be the root causes of their foul smelling breath. There are a few cases, however, that the persistence of the halitosis condition of a person is due to a more serious underlying medical condition. In some cases diabetes = bad breath. Diabetes is considered to be one of the many medical conditions that could have bad breath as one of its symptoms. The Correlation of Diabetes & Bad Breath Diabetes is a medical condition that causes the body to have high blood sugar caused by the body’s inability to either produce ample amount of insulin or inability to respond to the produced insulin by the body. This uncontrollable and fluctuating blood sugar levels makes a person with this condition more prone to gum diseases that causes bad breath. Thus diabetes and bad breath usually go hand in hand. A person with diabetes has the inability to use sugar as a fuel source and instead, fat is utilized by the body instead. Due to this, the breakdown of fats causes the occurrence of ketones. These ketones are acidic and removed by the body through its waste and through the breath. When this happens,diabetes-bad breath occurs. Steps To Avoid Bad Breath In Diabetes There are several steps in eliminating diabetes bad breath. The most important step is to try to control blood sugar levels. In addition to this, oral hygiene regimens have to be strictly followed. Brush the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bad Breath Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes And Bad Breath Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

When you develop unusual breath, it could be an indication of an underlying health problem. For example, a fruity smell is associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. If you have an odor that smells like ammonia, it could be a sign that you are suffering from kidney disease. Bad breath could also occur as a result of taking certain types of medications such as metformin. Even diabetes can cause bad breath. Bad breath, which is scientifically known as halitosis, can affect a sufferer’s self esteem. While there are many factors which can contribute to bad breath, brushing regularly and talking to your dentist or doctor can help prevent it. You want to ensure you eliminate plaque build up, gum disease, or bacteria growth, which can also contribute to bad breath, before you consider other treatment options. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic medical condition where a patient is unable to produce enough insulin or their body becomes resistant to it. Insulin is a natural hormone that is made by the beta cells located in the pancreas. This hormone helps glucose enter the cells where it is stored or converted into energy. In people with diabetes, the body either produces too little insulin or none at all. This means that glucose remains in the bloodstream. Hence, they experience high levels of blood sugar. If left untreated, too much sugar in the blood can lead to serious long term problems, such as kidney problems, blindness, or nerve damage. Even though diabetes has no cure, it can be managed through a proper diet plan, regular exercise, and taking medication. Diabetes and bad breath If you have bad breath, it does not imply that you are diabetic. However, there is a relationship between diabetes and bad breath that you should know about. In patients with diabetes, high lev Continue reading >>

Bad Breath? Chances Are That You Could Be Diabetic

Bad Breath? Chances Are That You Could Be Diabetic

Bad Breath? Chances are that you could be Diabetic. Breath odour is the scent of the air you breathe out of your mouth. Unpleasant breath odour is commonly called bad breath orhalitosis; this is something you should not ignore. Those close to you would certainly agree. Bad breath can originate from the most common causes like, poor dental or oral hygiene, the cook's heavy hand with garlic or an underlying serious health problem? Regardless, you can take steps to prevent bad breath at home and treat halitosis with the help of your dentist. Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. ·Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of sulphur compounds by bacteria in the mouth ·Fruity odour in the breath is a sign ofketoacidosis, which may occur in diabetes. It is a potentially life-threatening condition ·Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolongedvomiting,especially when there is abowel obstruction ·Bad breath having an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or"fishy") occurs in people withchronic kidneydisease ·Similarly, a very foul fruit odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa ·Other diseases, such as asthma, lung and liver disease also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so intense that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying if you have pre-diabetes or early-stage diabetes. And researchers are testing a breath analyzer that even measures blood glucose levels. What Causes Diabetes Breath? Diabetes induced halitosis has two main causes: Gum disease High levels of ketones in the blood. Gum Diseases (Periodontitis) Gum diseas Continue reading >>

Bad Breath (halitosis)

Bad Breath (halitosis)

Tweet Halitosis, better known as 'bad breath', is sometimes associated with diabetes. several dental and oral conditions can also cause halitosis. Having bad breath can have knock-on effects, such as loss of self-esteem and even contribute to depression. People with diabetes can lessen their risk of bad breath by avoiding sugary drinks and food and maintaining good oral health and blood sugar levels. What causes bad breath? The causes of bad breath are wide reaching but the condition is often linked to poor dental plaque removal. Plaque bacteria, which live in-between the teeth and on the surface of the tongue, digest glucose or food particles then release foul-smelling gasses. There are some medical conditions, including diabetes, which make people more susceptible to halitosis. In people with diabetes, high blood sugar levels increase glucose levels in saliva. This provides food for bacteria in the mouth and leads to the build-up of dental plaque. If plaque is not removed effectively tooth decay and gum disease may occur which also causes halitosis. Diabetes can cause ketoacidosis, which is where the body burns fat instead of glucose if there is too little insulin in the blood, or if insulin resistance is too high. Ketones then form as a waste product which cause an unusual smell on the breath sometimes compared to pear drops. If you notice you have bad breath, it could be a side effect of your regular medications. Some people report having bad breath as a result of taking metformin. If you take metformin and think it is causing you to have bad breath, contact your diabetes healthcare team for advice on alternative medications which may be available. Preventing bad breath The best way to prevent bad breath is to have a good plaque removal regime. Ensuring you brush an Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. It's important to seek medical advice quickly if you think that you or your child is experiencing the condition. Causes of diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that can occur if the body starts to run out of insulin. It's common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. Children and young adults are most at risk. Insulin enables the body to use blood sugar (glucose). If there is a lack of insulin, or if it can't be used properly, the body will break down fat instead. The breakdown of fat releases harmful, acidic substances called ketones.The lack of insulin in your body leads to high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). The combination of high ketone and blood sugar levels can cause a number of symptoms that can be very serious if the levels aren't corrected quickly. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis The initial symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis can develop quite suddenly. They will continue to get worse if not treated. Early symptoms In the early stages, the main signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine severe thirst weight loss feeling sick tiredness You may also develop other symptoms of dehydration, such as a dry mouth. If you have your own device or kit to measure your blood sugar and/or ketone levels, you may notice that the levels of both of these are higher than normal. Advanced symptoms Left untreated, more advanced symptoms can develop, including: rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) rapid breathing, where you breathe in more oxygen than your body actua Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Halitosis

Can Diabetes Cause Halitosis

There are numerous causes for bad breath, and you may have to talk to your doctor concerning the reasons that you may be experiencing bad breath, and are incapable of getting rid of it. Diabetes is one of the main reasons for bad breath halitosis, but most people don't realize it, and many people don't realize that this problem is very simple to fix. Individuals with halitosis and diabetes have to continually be watchful of their blood sugar, and the primary way to make sure that blood sugars are kept at a healthy level is to maintain a healthy diet. Since the body does not produce insulin in people with diabetes, eating foods that are high in artificial sugars is definitely not a good idea. google_ad_layout="in-article";google_ad_format="482x121";google_ad_client="ca-pub-0933858739464409";google_ad_slot="4476998658";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_ad_width=482;google_ad_height=121;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=11;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["368226201","21061122","191880501"],"loeids":["368226211"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=false;google_ad_unit_key="1554298510";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="3484589445";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=2;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_1";google_start_time=1514540138843;google_pub_vars="JTdCJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2xheW91dCUyMiUzQSUyMmluLWFydGljbGUlMjIlMkMlMjJnb29nbGVfYWRfZm9ybWF0JTIyJTNBJTIyNDgyeDEyMSUyMiUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZF9jbGllbnQlMjIlM0ElMjJjYS1wdWItMDkzMzg1ODczOTQ2NDQwOSUyMiUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZF9zbG90JTIyJTNBJTIyNDQ3Njk5ODY1OCUyMiUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZHNieWdvb2dsZV9zdGF0dXMlMjIlM0ElMjJkb25lJTIyJTJDJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX3dpZHRoJTIyJTNBNDgyJTJDJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2hlaWdodCUyMiUzQTEyMSUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZF9yZXNpemFibGUlMjIlM Continue reading >>

11 Types Of Bad Breath And Their Causes

11 Types Of Bad Breath And Their Causes

50 million people suffer from chronic halitosis (bad breath) in the US, but many dont seek help because theyre embarrassed. Thats a shame because although bad breath is often caused by oral problems , other bad breath causes are associated with other health problems.And bad breath can be a sign of serious disease. Studies suggest 5-10% of bad breath causes are due to disease outside the mouth. Thats 2-5 million people whose bodies are warning them of a serious problem. 90% of bad breath comes from proteins broken down in your mouth. When bad breath is caused by oral problems, it usually smells like rotten eggs. This is caused by the breakdown of cysteine at the front of the tongue or on the gums. Its a sign of poor oral hygiene. More rarely, dental bad breath can be a fecal odor like odor from the gums or the top of the tongue. This is caused by imbalances within the mouth or from protein breakdown on the gum tissue or tongue. If you have bad breath, your first step is a dental exam and good oral hygiene. However, the mouth-body connection means that other bad breath smells can tell you about problems elsewhere in your body. If you or your dentist can identify the type of smell in your bad breath, this can help to pinpoint its origin. This oral-systemic link means your dentist may identify potential problems elsewhere in your body just as an optician can by examining your eyes. Here are the types of smells different systemic disease bad breath: A cheesy smell usually indicates your bad breath has a nasal origin. A fruity smell may indicate uncontrolled diabetes due to increased A fishy smell may indicate kidney disease, as increased urea levels can cause a fishy smell such as in (trimethylaminuria) An acidic smell can be a sign of asthma or cystic fibrosis A scent of a Continue reading >>

How Dogs Sniff Out Diabetes On Your Breath

How Dogs Sniff Out Diabetes On Your Breath

How dogs sniff out diabetes on your breath Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. A new study found the chemical dogs use to smell hypoglycemia on human breath The chemical could lead to new tech to help people keep track of their blood sugar Imagine if your dog could sense when you're about to pass out -- and do so in enough time to stop it. Now, imagine that all they need is their nose. This scenario is a reality for hundreds worldwide, including Claire Pesterfield, a pediatric diabetes nurse at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Pesterfield has type 1 diabetes, a form of the condition in which the pancreas is unable to produce any insulin and cannot regulate blood sugar. Her sugar levels can fall dangerously low -- known as hypoglycemia -- causing shakiness, confusion, disorientation and potentially unconsciousness. But her golden Labrador retriever sidekick is ready to alert her before it kicks in, day or night. "If he smells a hypo coming, he'll jump up and put his paws on my shoulders to let me know," Pesterfield said. Her dog, Magic, is one of 75 medical alert assistance dogs trained by the UK charity Medical Detection Dogs to help people monitor a range of health conditions, including type 1 diabetes. About 10% of all people with diabetes are estimated to have type 1, in which the risk of hypoglycemia is far greater. The dogs have been in service since 2009, trained to detect changes in their owner's breath when blood sugar declines, but the precise scents they're picking up have remained largely unknown -- until now. "We're interested if there are messages coming off the body at different blood sugar levels, either on the skin or breath," said Dr. Mark Evans , a consultant in diabetes and gen Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

3 Sudden Warning Signs That Could Save Your Life

3 Sudden Warning Signs That Could Save Your Life

3 Sudden Warning Signs That Could Save Your Life By knowing the sudden warning signs associated with diabetes, ovarian cancer and stroke, you could save your own life. Diabetes. Ovarian cancer. Stroke. These serious medical conditions can stop a woman in her tracks. The three sudden warning signs associated with diabetes, ovarian cancer and stroke may seem unusual and are often overlooked. Commit them to memory, and youll gain a leg up on how to detect potentially major health problems. Your Breath Smells Like Nail Polish Remover = Possible Symptom of Diabetes Over 80 million Americans suffer from diabetes. Disturbingly, almost one-third of Americans living with diabetes are unaware they have it. The sudden warning sign of ones breath smelling like nail polish remover occurs when your body is unable to utilize sugar properly, and burns fat for fuel instead. The chemical compounds released during this process are known as ketones. The ketone, acetone a key ingredient in nail polish remover produces the telltale diabetes warning sign of fruity-smelling breath. You may also experience a fruity taste in your mouth that persists even after youve brushed your teeth. Referred to medically as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), this symptom can result in a diabetic coma if left untreated. Additional warning signs of diabetes include: If you experience acetone-scented breath or any other warning signs linked to diabetes, schedule an appointment with your physician. Youll likely be asked to fast for at least 8 hours beforehand so the doctor can check your blood sugar level via a simple blood test. Bear in mind, a healthy fasting blood sugar level is between 70 and 100mg/dl; a reading over 200mg/dl may signal diabetes. While type 1 diabetes is managed with insulin injection therapy, typ Continue reading >>

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