diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Breakthrough Type 2

Breakthroughs For Diabetes Treatments

Breakthroughs For Diabetes Treatments

Reading Time: 9 minutes. >> Summary: Recently pharmaceutical firms have released new diabetes treatments, including one in the past week. Moreover, a promising new therapy that attacks the root cause of type 2 diabetes is in the development pipeline. [This article first appeared on the LongevityFacts.com website. Author: Brady Hartman. ] The CDC recently shocked the public when they reported that 40% of Americans walking around today would develop type 2 diabetes. Many people develop type 2 diabetes as they age because their body’s response to insulin – the hormone that controls sugar levels – gets weaker. Fortunately, scientists have discovered new treatments for the disease and have more in the pipeline. One such drug, ertugliflozin (brand name Steglatro) was released less than a week ago. Moreover, researchers at UCSD are developing a promising new therapy that attacks type 2 diabetes at its cellular roots. Furthermore, doctors have developed a medication maintenance program, which can help prevent type 2 diabetics from health-robbing complications such as blindness, heart and kidney disease, and peripheral vascular disease. There is also hope for type 1 diabetics, as scientists are working on improved insulin delivery devices, replacing damaged pancreases with stem cell-derived islet cells and the novel ‘pancreas in a box‘ that may restore normal insulin regulation. Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has been a documented human disorder for millennia, but only in recent decades has it developed into an epidemic. Mentions of the condition in ancient medical texts are rare. The primary drivers of the worldwide epidemic are the increasing age of the population, and the obesity epidemic, fed by the growing global adoption of the Western diet. Obesity – the mo Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

Diabetes is not just one condition - but whether your body is struggling with blood sugar levels due to type 1, or type 2, or even only during pregnancy, it's a serious condition that requires daily care and still doesn't have a cure. But scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Brand new beta cells. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. 2. A preventative vaccine. Finnish researchers are about to embark on the first-ever clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes prevention vaccine. While it's not a cure for those who already have the condition, a successful vaccine could potentially prevent thousands of cases each year, as the vaccine targets a virus linked with the development of an autoimmune reaction in the pancreas. 3. A unique transplant. One woman with severe type 1 diabetes has spent a year without insulin injections thanks to an experimental transplant. Doctors implanted insulin-producing cells into a fatty membrane in the stomach cavity, and the success of the operation is paving the way towards more people receiving artificial pancreases. 4. New pancreas tissue. Earlier this year scientists announced that they reversed type 1 diabetes in mice by giving them a transplant of pancreatic tissue. The tissue was grown using stem cells from non-diabetic mice, and the success of this method suggests i Continue reading >>

Irish Scientist Discovers Breakthrough For Diabetes Cure

Irish Scientist Discovers Breakthrough For Diabetes Cure

A US medical 'dream team' which is currently being led by an Irish scientist has made a huge step forward in their attempts to discover a cure for Type 2 diabetes. Is this the end of insulin shots? Irish scientists are a smart bunch. Last week they were in the news for developing a method that may be able to predict the onset of a stroke. Now an Irish scientist may have found a way to cure diabetes. The Irish Independent reports that a US medical ‘dream team’ which is currently being led by an Irish scientist has made a huge step forward in their attempts to discover a cure for Type 2 diabetes. Amazing, right? The research, which is currently being undertaken at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio in the US has revealed that weight loss surgery can actually reduce, or even eliminate, a diabetic’s dependence on insulin and other medication used to treat the condition. However, Professor John Kirwan also made another discovery. The research undertaken by his team revealed that there is a mystery protein present in cases of diabetes. If this protein can be harnessed, the treatment of the condition could be radically revolutionized. Professor Kirwan, originally from Tullow in County Carlow, has been working on this research since 2007. “It took us a long time. We knew going in that we had something of great clinical significance,” he said, speaking to the Irish Independent. Type 2 diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of the condition. It occurs when there is a high level of sugar in the blood. If left untreated, diabetes can cause heart disease, stroke and even kidney failure. In short, it is a serious, life-threatening illness. The medical trial undertaken by Professor Kirwan and his team involved 150 patients. The patients were divided up into thr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Has Its Breakthrough – Researchers Take Note

Type 2 Diabetes Has Its Breakthrough – Researchers Take Note

There’s not a week that goes by without a team of researchers thinking they’ve found a new way to treat type 2 diabetes. “This drug could represent a new avenue for treating type 2 diabetes.” Each time I see a line like this I can’t help but shake my head a little. Why? Because I know full well that the breakthrough towards treating type 2 diabetes has already been found. A few years ago, getting type 2 diabetes under control whilst coming off all diabetes medication was perceived to be unthinkable. But within recent years, this has become a regular achievement. Now, each month people are being told by the doctors who first diagnosed them that their diabetes is now resolved. Their diabetes is back in control and as long as they keep doing what they’re doing, they can happily say “so long” to their diabetes meds. Seeking a holy grail It’s frustrating seeing researchers searching for a holy grail: the drug that treats a condition without any side effects. To the best of my knowledge, no such drug for a metabolic condition has ever been created. All drugs end up causing side effects. It doesn’t matter how excited the researchers or the drug companies get at first, it takes only a few years before the full extent of the side effects start coming out of the woodwork. The magnificent thing about a healthy, low-carb diet is that, not only does it have none of the long-term side effects of drugs, it actually makes people better in all sorts of ways. It doesn’t just help control blood sugar, it helps with weight loss, reduces depression, blood pressure, improves cholesterol and when maintained as a lifestyle for life, will almost certainly reduce risks of heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer. So why are researchers so desperate to get people to take a pi Continue reading >>

Potential Breakthrough In Treating Type 2 Diabetes

Potential Breakthrough In Treating Type 2 Diabetes

By blocking VEGF-B, a signaling protein, fat does not accumulate in muscles and the heart, and the cells within those tissues can respond properly to insulin again, researchers from the Karolinska Institute, Sweden, the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, based in New York, and the Australian biopharmaceutical company CSL Limited reported in the journal Nature. Professor Ulf Eriksson and team carried out experiments on rats and mice, and managed to prevent type II diabetes from developing in the first place, as well as reversing disease progression in animals with established diabetes type II. Nature has described this finding as a "breakthrough in diabetes research". Professor Ulf Eriksson, of the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics at Karolinska Institutet, said: "It's a great feeling to present these results. We discovered VEGF-B back in 1995, and since then the VEGF-B project has been a lengthy sojourn in the wilderness, but now we're making one important discovery after the other. In this present study we've shown that VEGF-B inhibition can be used to prevent and treat type II diabetes, and that this can be done with a drug candidate." Typically, type II diabetes occurs after a person becomes obese, then insulin resistance occurs - the diabetes comes next. When this occurs, the cells do not respond properly to insulin, meaning that glucose does not enter the cells and blood glucose (sugar) levels rise. When fat is stored in the "wrong" places in the body, insulin resistance is much more likely to occur. The wrong places include the blood vessels, heart and muscles. Experts are not sure exactly how the association works. With insulin resistance, not enough glucose enters the cells - it accumulates in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar We Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough: Intense Therapy Increases Median Lifetime By 8 Years, Study Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough: Intense Therapy Increases Median Lifetime By 8 Years, Study Shows

Comprehensive and intense treatment can extend median lifetime by eight years for people with type 2 diabetes and those suffering microalbuminuria, according to a longitudinal Danish follow-up study released Thursday. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans and one in four are not aware that they have the chronic condition, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease increases blood glucose, blood lipids, blood platelet aggregation and blood pressure resulting in higher chances of vascular and organ damage. Diabetes can also lower life expectancy of patients. Those having type 2 diabetes also have increased levels of albumin in the urine resulting in microalbuminuria. This is a marker of vascular damage. If left untreated, diabetic patients have elevated risk of cardiovascular problems and premature death. Researchers conducted the follow-up study to find the differences in median lifespan of the intensified and conventionally treated patients. For the latest findings, they conducted a follow-up study on the popular Steno-2 study — a randomized trial of intensified vs. standard multifactorial intervention for nearly eight years in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. It included 160 type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. “The outcome of our study is very encouraging and emphasises the need for early and intensified treatment of multiple modifiable risk factors for a poor prognosis of patients with type 2 diabetes,” Peter Gaede, one of the authors of the study, said in a statement. Researchers explained that in the intensive treatment group, therapy was conducted at a specialized diabetes clinic and was target-driven and intensified with continued behavioral education (a green and low fat diet, more da Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough At Newcastle University

Diabetes Breakthrough At Newcastle University

Pioneering research from Newcastle University has helped a 'high percentage' of people with Type 2 diabetes to reverse the condition. A year-long medical trial showed that nearly 9 out of 10 people - who lost 2 stone or more on a low calorie diet - experienced a reduction in blood sugar levels. Research was also conducted by Glasgow University and funded by the charity Diabetes UK. Our basic studies have shown us how we can reverse diabetes and we need to achieve much greater weight loss than has been previously recognised. We've established a practical way of doing this, we've rolled it out in general practice, in primary care, in a way that might be practical for the nHS, and we've achieved quite startling results. Continue reading >>

The Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough

The Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough

This Silent Assassin Doubles Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke ...but more than half of those at risk don't even know it. How to tell if you are and what you can do about it. By Frank Shallenberger, MD As someone who cares about your health, you try to avoid sugar and refined carbs. You try to exercise. But despite your healthy intentions, you may still be at risk for a heart attack or stroke. You see, there is a silent assassin stalking you. This silent assassin kills 1 person every 10 seconds. And more than half of them never knew they were at risk. They never saw it coming. So what is this silent assassin? It's diabetes. Now I know what you're thinking. "I'm not at risk for diabetes." I hope that's true. I hope you're making the lifestyle choices that will lower your chances. Maybe you're taking supplements like chromium, vanadium, or gymnema sylvestre to balance your blood sugar. They are very effective. I prescribe them to my patients and see excellent results with them. But a healthy lifestyle and supplements may still not be enough to protect you. You may have a family history of diabetes ... you may have high blood pressure ... or high cholesterol ... or you may simply not get enough sleep at night. They are all risk factors for developing diabetes. You see, most people view diabetes as a disease where the pancreas is worn out. That's true. But there's a hidden cause that leads to the pancreas wearing out in the first place. I'll explain what this hidden cause is in just a minute. But first I want to share how one of my patients avoided becoming a victim. Antonio was 43 years old when he first came to see me four years ago. He complained of the two symptoms that I hear the most in my practice: being tired and overweight. His insulin levels were elevated, and Continue reading >>

The Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: A Revolutionary Approach To Treating Type 2 Diabetes (easyread Large Edition)

The Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: A Revolutionary Approach To Treating Type 2 Diabetes (easyread Large Edition)

It is everyone's greatest desire to have boundless energy and health. Think back to when you were at your healthiest and most energetic; your mind was quick and sharp, positive and unstoppable. What if you could have that back, maybe even better than your best, and keep it for as long as you live? Or maybe you have never felt as vital as you thought you could. Well, this b ...more Continue reading >>

Losing Weight And Exercising May Be More Effective At Combating Type 2 Diabetes Than Drugs

Losing Weight And Exercising May Be More Effective At Combating Type 2 Diabetes Than Drugs

LOSING weight and exercising may be more effective at combating type 2 diabetes than drugs, a new study suggests. Patients who take part in cheap lifestyle programmes are less likely to need stronger medication and are more likely to have better blood sugar levels, the study claims. PA:Press Association Researchers from the University of Glasgow tracked 1,500 type 2 diabetes patients who attended such programmes and compared them to patients who did not. They found people who completed the 16-week course saw no increase in their oral diabetes medication, and were half as likely to progress to need to take insulin. Patients who completed the Clyde Glasgow and Clyde weight management service lifestyle programme were likely to weigh an average of 8kg less three years later, patients who did not were an average 1kg lighter. The study, published in Diabetes Obesity and Metabolism, also found that patients who successfully lost 5kg had a significant reduction in their blood sugar levels, even three years after completing the programme. Type 2 diabetes sufferers in the UK have 'worst blood sugar management' across Europe The authors wrote: "A real-life structured weight management intervention in patients with diabetes can reduce weight in the medium term, result in improved glycaemic control with fewer medications, and may be more effective than pharmacological alternatives." Dr Jennifer Logue, lead author of the study from the University of Glasgow, said: "This is the first real-world study to show that the lifestyle weight management programmes that we deliver in the NHS can have a long-lasting meaningful clinical effect on type 2 diabetes. "Our hope is that this study will convince patients, clinicians and NHS managers that these inexpensive programmes can make a clinicall Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the most common form of diabetes, is considered a metabolic disorder that results in high-blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) caused by an insulin resistance and deficiency. A normally functioning pancreas will secrete the insulin hormone in low amounts after eating a meal. The glucose (sugar) found in the foods we eat stimulate the secretion of the insulin hormone proportional to the size of each meal. The main role of insulin is to help move specific nutrients into the body’s cells, mainly sugar, which they use as a source of energy. When glucose levels in the bloodstream rise, the beta cells located in the pancreas increase the secretion of insulin to avoid hyperglycemia. In type 2 diabetes, this process works improperly. Instead of moving into your cells to be used as a source of energy, glucose builds up in your bloodstream. Unlike people diagnosed with type 1, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes produce the hormone insulin. The two main problems caused by type 2 diabetes is the pancreas not producing enough insulin and the body not using the insulin sufficiently. A diagnosis of T2DM occurs when the body does not use the hormone insulin properly. The process of improper secretion and absorption is referred to as insulin resistance. In the early stages, the pancreas makes extra insulin to regulate the high blood glucose (sugar) levels, but over time it is not able to make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used properly, glucose can’t get into the body’s cells as it should, causing body’s cells to not function normally. Although it is diagnosed far more than type 1 diabetes, the causes of type 2 diabetes are considered to be less understoo Continue reading >>

Professors Scoop Award For Protein Breakthrough In Type 2 Diabetes And Alzheimer's

Professors Scoop Award For Protein Breakthrough In Type 2 Diabetes And Alzheimer's

Professors from the US and Japan have won a prestigious award for their research into a biological mechanism that has implications for type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Peter Walter, PhD, professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UC San Francisco (UCSF), and Kazutoshi Mori, PhD, a leading researcher at Kyoto University, have been announced winners of the 2018 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, for their research into the unfolded protein response. The scientists identified that while unfolded proteins normally protect cells, they can also cause disease if not functioning properly. Protein folding occurs within a structure known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). When sensor molecules in the ER membrane detect the stress of misfolded proteins, this causes a response that can cause cells to self-destruct. The finding has helped scientists learn more about the mechanisms behind type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and some cancers. In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance can overwhelm the ER in the beta cells of the pancreas. Because there are too many proteins which need to be unfolded, the body can't keep up, and this can result in cells self-destructing, which affects the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin. In Alzheimer's disease, which is linked with type 2 diabetes, a similar process occurs. Too many unfolded proteins in the brain also results in cell death. Over time this can lead to problems with the brain such as memory loss. Walter and Mori were recognised for "elucidating the unfolded protein response, a cellular quality-control system that detects disease-causing unfolded proteins and directs cells to take corrective measures". UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood said: "Over the course of a research career spanning more than three decades, Peter has made s Continue reading >>

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes is achieved by acting in our brain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, in collaboration with teams from the Universities of Cambridge and Michigan, have discovered that the medication Lorcaserin acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes by modifying the activity of neurones that help to regulate blood glucose levels. Lorcaserin is prescribed to help patients lose weight and works by regulating how hungry we feel. However, researchers have discovered that as well as doing this, the drug can also reduce glucose levels in the body and increase the body's cells sensitivity to insulin. When the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body's cells fail to react to insulin this leads to Type 2 diabetes meaning that glucose remains in the blood rather than being used as fuel for energy. Professor Lora Heisler, who is leading the Aberdeen team, explains: "Current medications for type 2 diabetes improve symptoms of this disease by acting in the body. We have discovered that this obesity drug, lorcaserin, acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes. "Lorcaserin targets important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which are responsible for regulating appetite. So as well as sending messages telling us we are full and no longer need to eat, leading to weight loss, the POMC hormones also activate a different brain circuit that helps keep our blood glucose in check. "This discovery is important because type 2 diabetes is an incredibly prevalent disease in the modern world and new treat Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough: Type 2 'can Be Reversed In Weeks By Following This Diet'

Diabetes Breakthrough: Type 2 'can Be Reversed In Weeks By Following This Diet'

Scientists say lifestyle driven Type 2 - a condition that almost 12 million Britons are thought to be at risk of developing - is caused by excess fat in the liver and pancreas. Findings due to be presented today have given fresh hope that the debilitating disease need not to a life sentence. They reveal that even if sufferers have been blighted for years the condition can be brought under control by sensible eating. Professor Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, said: “The good news for people with Type 2 is our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas. At present, this can only be done through substantial weight loss.” The good news for people with Type 2 is our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas Nine in 10 Type 2 sufferers are overweight or obese and do not produce enough insulin, or the insulin they produce does not work properly. Professor Taylor, who has spent 40 years studying the condition, will deliver his research to an international collaboration of experts at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon. He will claim excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver. As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose. Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail. He says losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2. And he says this remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the debilitating disease. Pro Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: Scientists Create First Pill That Not Only Stops The Condition In Its Tracks But Also Helps Patients Lose Weight - And It Could Be Available On The Nhs Within 3 Years

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: Scientists Create First Pill That Not Only Stops The Condition In Its Tracks But Also Helps Patients Lose Weight - And It Could Be Available On The Nhs Within 3 Years

Scientists have created a new pill that can halt type 2 diabetes in its tracks and help patients shed pounds from their waistlines, a major study has revealed. Results from a human trial of 632 patients found semaglutide allowed 71 per cent of them to shed pounds - it is believed this is the first type 2 diabetes pill to instigate weight loss. Researchers hope semaglutide will offer a better way to control the hidden killer, as some treatments currently available can trigger unexpected weight gain which fuels type 2 diabetes. Results from the phase II trial carried out by the Leicester Diabetes Centre were published in the prestigious JAMA. Semaglutide could be available on the NHS within three years. The pill was handed as an add-on to patients already taking Metformin - the drug is the first line of defence to control the preventable condition. Researchers discovered semaglutide stopped type 2 diabetes in its tracks, slashed blood sugar levels and prevented patients from needing insulin. Type 2 diabetes can lead to heart failure, blindness and leg amputations and is deemed a global time bomb. Spiraling obesity rates have fuelled a 65 per cent rise in diagnoses in a decade, with more than 4 million people now living with the condition, UK data shows. Globally there are 380 million patients. Charities have warned the NHS will become crippled by the burden of the condition without urgent action to make changes to today’s lifestyles. Professor Melanie Davies, lead author, dubbed the results 'hugely promising' and said they show 'semaglutide’s ability to lower HbA1c and support weight loss'. Offering patients some relief Lead author Professor Melanie Davies said taking semaglutide as a pill may provide relief to some diabetics who 'struggle injecting themselves'. She t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes