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Diabetes Breakthrough Bananas

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Knowledge is power. But, it can be dangerous too. The wrong kind of knowledge, I mean. The wrong information – when you think something is true, but, in fact, the truth lies elsewhere. Like the case of bananas and diabetes – can diabetics eat bananas? A case of gross misinterpretation and lack of proper knowledge. But worry not, we are here to take care of that. Banana – A Brief A fruit so ‘everyday’ (and delicious) that there wouldn’t be a soul that doesn’t like it. Botanically speaking, banana is a berry. In certain nations, the bananas that are used for cooking are called plantains. Usually elongated and curved, the soft flesh is rich in starch and is covered with a rind that can be yellow, green or brownish-red. Banana is grown in over 135 countries worldwide. The fruit is also cultivated for its fiber, banana wine, and banana beer. There is no distinct difference between bananas and plantains, except that plantains tend to be a little firmer and starchier. Yes, banana is a lip-smacking fruit that improves any dish that you add it to. It has superb benefits and helps prevent numerous diseases. But… …is that the case with diabetes too? Let’s find out. Diabetes And Bananas – The Connection Why bananas? The fruit is considered to be one of the healthiest and most potent. What does it have to do anything with diabetes? Why the link? Let’s have a glance at diabetes – it is a condition where your body cannot efficiently use the insulin that it produces. This ultimately leads to the accumulation of glucose in your blood, resulting in high blood sugar. And now, for the link – the average banana contains about 30 grams of carbohydrates. And most of these carbs come from sugars. Hence, the connection. The larger the banana, the more the sugars. So, Continue reading >>

Amazing Benefits Of Mangoes For Diabetes

Amazing Benefits Of Mangoes For Diabetes

Just the thought of mangeos may elicit images of tropical beaches, palm trees, ocean waves gently covering the sandy beach…eating mangeos by the ocean with cool ocean breezes wafting over you… Mangos are the fruit of the mango tree—and it brings images of a tropical island because it is a tropical fruit. Mangos are actually the world’s most popular fruit! Mangos are full of vitamins—particularly Vitamins A and C—where one mango provides about 1/3 of the RDA for Vitamin A and nearly 100% of the RDA for Vitamin C. Mangos also contain significant amounts of Vitamins E, K and B complex vitamins (except for Vitamin B12). Mangos are also high in fiber and contain calcium, potassium and copper. They also contain some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, though overall, are very low in fat. One ripe mango can contain 31 grams of sugar, but its glycemic load is only 10—the fiber in mango helps limit the rapid absorption of the sugars. One mango also has 135 calories—not so bad![1] Mangos are higher in sugars than many other fruits, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t eat mangeos. The Mayo clinic recommends that one serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrate—that translates to about ½ cup of mango. If a fruit has lower carbohydrate or sugars, that generally means you can enjoy more of it—but it doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the higher carbohydrate fruits![2] Just remember to keep track of the total carbohydrates in a day. In fact, studies indicate that eating mangeos can help prevent diabetes complications and may even treat prediabetes and prevent diabetes. Why Would Mangos Be Good For Diabetes? Most nutritional sites contain information like that given above—the level of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. That is great, Continue reading >>

Is Banana Beneficial For Diabetics

Is Banana Beneficial For Diabetics

Good news for the diabetic sweet tooth! The American Diabetes Association has announced that you can eat almost any fruit, even bananas. And the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends a daily consumption of between 1½ – 2 cups of fruit daily, while the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases cites bananas with other fruits that diabetics can safely add to their diets. It is recommended that the consumption of fruit be distributed at regular times during the day in order to prevent sudden elevation in levels of blood sugar. But don’t forget the carbohydrates in fruits, and be sure to count them when you’re planning your meal. Click here to find the best method to cure your diabetes naturally The Concern About Carbs Diabetics must be vigilant about the type and the amount of carbohydrates they consume. By utilizing the insulin hormone, your body breaks down carbs and converts them to glucose, providing energy and fueling cells. However, diabetics have problems with insulin, which may cause abnormally high glucose levels to flow through the bloodstream. Since almost all fruit contains a large number of carbohydrates, eating too many can dump an amount of glucose greater than the body can process. Even so, carbs are an invaluable nutrient that our bodies need to survive. The key is to manage them properly within the special dietary needs of a diabetic. The Beneficial Banana According to the USDA, bananas are America’s favorite fruit. This is good because they’re very beneficial as well. Bananas have a low calorie count but are high in vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium, and fiber. The fiber helps keep you feeling full and satisfies your cravings, Vitamin C enhances the immune system, Vitamin B6 boosts your mood, and potassium helps contr Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

The First Superfood: Doctors Believed Bananas Could Cure Celiac Disease.

The First Superfood: Doctors Believed Bananas Could Cure Celiac Disease.

Excerpted from The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What You Eat by Alan Levinovitz. Out now from Regan Arts. At the turn of the 20th century, the United Fruit Co. mounted an aggressive advertising campaign to complement its increased capacity to grow and import bananas. With the fruit no longer an exotic luxury, United Fruit took advantage of testimonials by doctors and nutritionists to reimagine bananas as a superfoodthe acai or goji berries of the early 20th century. A 1917 industry publication, Food Value of the Banana, included a glowing endorsement from the Journal of the American Medical Association: This fruit is sealed by nature in practically germ-free and germ-proof packages. Numerous dietitians testified to their curative powers. It was only logical for physicians to try these superfruits with patients whose conditions had no viable treatment options. At the time, one such condition was celiac disease, and a prominent pediatrician and celiac researcher named Sidney Haas started a few of his own patients on a strict diet of bananas and milk, supplemented with broth, gelatin, and a little meat. The results were astonishing. Of 10 children treated, eight experienced dramatic symptom remission and dramatically increased height and weight. (According to Haas, the two who died failed to comply with his regimen.) Haas 1924 article, The Value of the Banana in the Treatment of Celiac Disease, described these results in hyperbolic terms accompanied by impressively detailed charts, nutritional breakdowns of the diet, and before-and-after photographs of strikingly transformed children. In all likelihood, Haas young patients really did experience miraculous transformations, since they were no longer eating gluten. But Haas didnt know about glutens role in celiac, so he Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Cure Diabetes

10 Foods That Cure Diabetes

Foods can control diabetes to the point where some diabetics can maintain normal blood sugar levels without medication. Although there may be a debate as to whether diet cures the condition, people diagnosed with diabetes can manage their blood glucose levels through certain foods and healthy lifestyle changes. Research has shown that some people with type 2 diabetes are able to keep their blood sugar levels out of the diabetes range through exercise and a diet that limits their calorie intake to 1,200 to 1,800 a day, according to WebMD. Even when diabetics still require medication, a proper meal plan can improve their condition significantly for a healthier life. Here are 10 foods with the nutrients to beat diabetes. SPECIAL: GMO Food: It's Worse Than We Thought . . . 1. Black, navy, pinto or kidney beans provide valuable protein without the saturated food from many protein foods. Beans are also high in fiber, magnesium and potassium. 2. Dark, green leafy vegetables are low in carbohydrates and calories, so people can eat a lot of them without fat and fullness. The American Diabetes Association recommends spinach, collards, and kale. 3. Fish with omega-3 fatty acids provide protein and fight the risk of heart disease. The ADA recommends six to nine ounces of fish a week. Diabetics should avoid breaded or fried fish and focus on grilled, broiled or baked fish. Omega-3 rich fish include salmon, tuna, sardines, herring, and mackerel. 4. Fat-free milk and yogurt avoid the fat while providing calcium as well as fortified vitamin D in many dairy products. 5. Whole grains give people a full feeling without the fat and offer nutrients. Whole grains include whole grain bread, whole grain pasta and brown rice. Refined gains lose nutrients during processing. 6. Fruits with low-gl Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Diabetics have to be careful about what they eat, and too many carbs or high glycemic index foods are usually a no-no. On the other hand, fresh fruit and vegetables are supposed to have a beneficial effect on the condition. So where does that leave you when it comes to fruit like the humble banana? When you have Type-2 diabetes, your body can’t produce adequate insulin, causing glucose to get pulled out of the blood for storage in cells. As a result, your sugar levels go through dips and spikes. This means your diet has a vital role to play in helping regulate the sugar levels. Very high glycemic foods can exaggerate the spikes and the sudden dips after the sugar is burnt through quickly. What’s In A Banana? Bananas are a rich source of dietary fiber as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium, making them a great healthy snack or ingredient in a meal. While the B6 keeps you in a good mood, vitamin C does wonders for your immune system, potassium helps regulate blood pressure, and the fiber keeps you feeling satiated for longer. One study even indicated that native banana starch (24 g per day) could be beneficial for increasing insulin sensitivity and may help lower body weight in obese Type-2 diabetics.1 It is no wonder then that they are also one of the most popular fresh fruits in the United States.2 What diabetics need to keep in mind though, is that bananas also contain carbohydrates and this must be factored in when planning your meals for the day. Diabetics Can Have Bananas Too The American Diabetes Association encourages the consumption of fruit by diabetics and says eating bananas as part of a healthy diet is absolutely okay.3 In fact, one study showed that a banana is actually among the best whole fruit (along with blueberries and grapefruit) you can h Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

A new scientific breakthrough could have found the cure for diabetes. The breakthrough has cured diabetes in mice – with no side effects. The research comes from a UT Health San Antonio report which describes the process as using a gene transfer which can increase the types of cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Researchers said they aim to reach human clinical trials within the next three years. “It worked perfectly,” assistant professor of medicine at UT Health, Dr Bruno Diron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That’s never been seen. “But it’s a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system.” Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Diabetes at UT Health described how the therapy works: “The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar]. This is basically just like beta cells.” Insulin, which diabetic people take injections of in order to keep their blood sugar levels at bay, are made up of beta cells. In Type 1 diabetes, these cells are destroyed by the immune system and so the patient is left without insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the beta cells fail and insulin decreases – with Type 2 the body also does not use insulin efficiently. If the procedure can be replicated successfully in humans, this could have the potential to cure Type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough: Type 2 'can Be Reversed In Weeks By Following This Diet'

Diabetes Breakthrough: Type 2 'can Be Reversed In Weeks By Following This Diet'

Scientists say lifestyle driven Type 2 - a condition that almost 12 million Britons are thought to be at risk of developing - is caused by excess fat in the liver and pancreas. Findings due to be presented today have given fresh hope that the debilitating disease need not to a life sentence. They reveal that even if sufferers have been blighted for years the condition can be brought under control by sensible eating. Professor Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, said: “The good news for people with Type 2 is our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas. At present, this can only be done through substantial weight loss.” The good news for people with Type 2 is our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas Nine in 10 Type 2 sufferers are overweight or obese and do not produce enough insulin, or the insulin they produce does not work properly. Professor Taylor, who has spent 40 years studying the condition, will deliver his research to an international collaboration of experts at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon. He will claim excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver. As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose. Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail. He says losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2. And he says this remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the debilitating disease. Pro Continue reading >>

Bananas And Diabetes: Are Bananas Good For Diabetics?

Bananas And Diabetes: Are Bananas Good For Diabetics?

Can bananas and diabetes go hand-in-hand? It goes without saying that diabetics need to be careful about their blood glucose levels. A careful ‘goldilocks’ level needs to be struck—not too high and not too low. The problem is that some foods can unexpectedly skew a diabetic’s blood sugar and cause adverse effects. Take the common banana, for instance. Although diabetics can have fruit, as long as they are aware of the glucose level, bananas have a noticeably higher glucose and carb content. Eating a banana and expecting an effect similar to an apple can result in an unwanted spike in blood sugar and, in the worst case, trigger a hyperglycemic episode. It is for this reason that some diabetic diets discourage eating bananas, but the truth is that they can be eaten safely. It just takes a bit of prudence. Ad Most people resign themselves to the fact that once they hit a certain age and start having bladder control issues, that all is lost. And that’s just simply not true. In fact, there is a bladder control solution right now in your kitchen, that you or your doctor might have never known about. Find out more here.. What’s the Big Deal About Bananas? Glycemic index of bananas: To understand why bananas would be a special concern to diabetics, it helps to look at the Glycemic Index. This is an impressive database that aims to quantify the relative impact that carbohydrates will have on your blood glucose level. Every food in the index contains a glycemic index rating, which assesses how high and for how long the food will raise your blood sugar, and a glycemic load rating, which is a combined value that consists of the combined quality and quantity ratings of the carbohydrates. The formula used to calculate all this is a very dense read to explain, but the main Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough? Scientists Discover Five Distinct Types

Diabetes Breakthrough? Scientists Discover Five Distinct Types

Diabetes breakthrough? Scientists discover FIVE distinct types Diabetes breakthrough? Scientists discover FIVE distinct types SCIENTISTS have discovered five distinct types of diabetes, offering new hope for better treatments, it was announced yesterday. Traditionally, the killer disease has been split into two types by medics. Type 1 is an auto-immune disease which cannot currently be cured. PUBLISHED: PUBLISHED: 23:30, Thu, Mar 1, 2018 Scientists have discovered five distinct types of diabetes, offering new hope for better treatments Type 2 on the other hand can be avoided by making lifestyle changes such as taking more exercise and eating a healthy diet. However, in the new study, researchers found that separating adult-onset diabetes into five distinct different types - rather than just type 1 or type 2 - could help to better tailor early treatment for patients. It would also represent a first step towards precision medicine in the disease, they said. In the new analysis, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, five types of the disease were found. Each had different characteristics and were associated with different complications, illustrating the varied treatment needs of patients with diabetes. Lead author of the new study Professor Leif Groop, of the Lund University Diabetes Centre (LUDC), Sweden, and Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), said: Evidence suggests that early treatment for diabetes is crucial to prevent life-shortening complications. More accurately diagnosing diabetes could give us valuable insights into how it will develop over time, allowing us to predict and treat complications before they develop. Type 2 diabetes: Seven meal plans for your weight loss diet He added: Existing treatment guidelines are limited by the Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes

Fruit And Diabetes

Everyone should be eating more fruit and vegetables. You're probably aware of the five a day target, and this is equally important if you’re living with diabetes or if you’re not. You might think you think that the sugar content of fruit means that you can’t eat it. But, the sugar in fruit is natural, and is not this type of sugar we need to cut down on. This is different to the added sugar in drinks, chocolate, cakes and biscuits, as well as in fruit juices and honey. The amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels and considering a portion of fruit contains about 15–20g carbs, a chocolate muffin has 55g carbs and a small bar of chocolate has 30g carbs it is better to reduce your intake of the chocolate, cakes and other snacks than the fruit itself to help manage your blood glucose levels. It is very unlikely that you need to reduce your fruit intake but you could keep a food diary to check how often and how much fruit you are eating. Some people find that it is easy to overdo the dried fruit, grapes and tropical fruits. If you consider a serving of dried fruit is a tablespoon and packs in 20.8g carbs, 20.8g total sugar and 82 calories you can see how easily this happens. An apple on the other hand, which takes a while to eat, contains only 11.8g carbs, 11.8g sugar and 47 calories. Be mindful of your serving sizes too – bananas in supermarkets now seem to be supersize with a large banana containing 27.8g carbs, 25.1g sugar and 114 calories. But, most people need to cut down on foods with added sugars rather than fruit – a large banana is still better for you than a a standard chocolate bar, which contains 27.9g carbohydrate, 27.8g sugars and a staggering 260 calories. Why do I need to be careful about fruit juices and Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

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