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Diabetes Body Odor

10 Sources Of Body Odor That Aren't Just Sweat

10 Sources Of Body Odor That Aren't Just Sweat

Sometimes, diabetes can be a cause of body odor. When untreated, this disease can cause a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Without enough insulin to regulate the metabolism, the body starts to break down fat for fuel. This causes a sickeningly sweet aroma comparable to decomposing apples. It's most obvious on a person's breath, but it's also given off by the body as well [source: Liddell]. That's why when a patient seeks treatment for body odor, physicians may order blood or urine tests to determine if there is an underlying medical condition such as diabetes [source: Mayo Clinic]. Do you smell baking? According to a 1976 medical journal article, patients afflicted with typhoid fever "emit a smell comparable to freshly baked brown bread" [source: Liddell]. That may actually sound kind of pleasant, but rest assured that typhoid fever is anything but. Patients with this disease usually develop a sustained fever as high as 103 to 104 degrees F (39 to 40 degrees C), and suffer stomach pains and headaches, as well as weakness. In some cases, they also experience a rash of flat, rose-colored spots. About 21.5 million people die from typhoid fever each year, mostly in developing countries. It's spread by eating food or drinking water handled by someone who already has the disease and is shedding the Salmonella Typhi bacteria [source: CDC]. As we've mentioned before, infectious diseases often cause changes in body odor. But immunizations, interestingly, can have similar effects. In an animal study published in 2014 in the journal Physiology and Behavior, researchers from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture demonstrated that immunization can trigger a distinct change in scent. Scientists believe that humans and other animals may give o Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Body Odor Causes

7 Surprising Body Odor Causes

SVGiles via Getty Images We’re going to assume you bathe, at least somewhat regularly. And yet, somehow, you still find yourself wondering... IS THAT ME?! Turns out, there are the occasional smells that no amount of scrubbing or brushing or deodorant-applying can deter. Here are a few of the most surprising. You’re Stressed Believe it or not, there are different types of sweat, chemically speaking. And the stinkiest sweat of all is stress sweat. That’s because it’s produced from a category of sweat glands called apocrine glands. Aprocrine glands produce a less-watery sweat, and bacteria go crazy for the fats and proteins in the mix. That feeding frenzy is what releases the odor, according to the Mayo Clinic. Sweat from your workouts or just because it’s too dang hot outside, on the other hand, is composed mostly of water and electrolytes, according to YouBeauty. You’ve Been “Blessed” With Stinky Feet That same all-you-can-eat buffet for bacteria happens with the sweat on your feet. And since your tootsies are tucked away in a dark, warm, moist environment, they really nurture bacteria — especially if you’re sans socks. But about 10 to 15 percent of people have extra-sweaty feet just by the luck of the genetic draw. Those ultra-moist dogs can then become home to a specific type of bacterium called Micrococcus sedentarius, which produces truly awful smelling sulfur compounds. Lucky you. You Have Too Few Favorite Bras Ladies: ‘fess up. How often do you wash your favorite bra? Yep, we thought so. “Many women overwear — and consequently underwash — bras because they have too few that fit properly,” bra expert (really!) Susan Nethero told Prevention. Because that lacy number is probably made of odor-trapping fabrics and definitely touches skin in Continue reading >>

What’s That Smell? What Your Body Odor Means About Your Health

What’s That Smell? What Your Body Odor Means About Your Health

While we might not like to admit it, but sometimes we smell. In fact, sometimes we smell really bad. Whether you just finished a workout, or decided to wear a flannel button up on the hottest day of the year, it happens. But if it’s particularly pungent, or if it happens on a daily basis, it could be caused by something more serious. Not many people know this, but your sweat doesn’t actually smell. That smell is created by bacteria on the skin breaking down the acids in sweat – this is called bromhidrosis [1]. Anyone who has reached puberty can produce body odor because this is when the apocrine sweat glands develop, which produce the sweat that bacteria break down. Men are more likely to have body odor, because they tend to sweat more than women. A few things that can make your body odor worse are [1]: Being overweight Consuming rich or spicy food and items like garlic, spices and alcohol Certain medications like antidepressants Most of the time, body odour just means that your body is hot so it decided to sweat and the bacteria on your skin are breaking it down. But other times, body odour can be the first sign of something a greater health problem. Trimethylaminuria (TMAU) This is a metabolic condition that is characterized by the body’s inability to properly metabolize trimethylamine, a byproduct of gut metabolism. As a result, individuals with TMAU develop an excess of trimethylamine within their body, causing them to give off a strange odor similar to rotting fish or garbage. TMAU is typically diagnosed in young people, and unusual body odor is the primary outward symptom of the disease. Diabetes This is one of the more common causes of body odor. When someone with diabetes fails to monitor and take care of their blood sugar, they can develop a condition c Continue reading >>

From Stress To Diabetes, Find Out What Your Odor Says About Your Body

From Stress To Diabetes, Find Out What Your Odor Says About Your Body

The term BO (body odor) is used frequently but what causes it? ALSO READ: Beauty craze: Women to use the foreskin to smoothen skin Stress They are two main types of sweat: the type that occurs when you work out and the type that occurs when it's hot outside. Both these types of sweat are composed mostly of water and electrolytes. Stress sweat, the third type, has very little water and more bacteria, which feeds on your fats and proteins. It's the by-product of that feeding that cause the odor. ​ Genetics Sweaty feet can be genetic and we do not help the situation by wearing socks and closed shoes. All you have done is create a warm home for bacteria, which produces smelly sulphur. Bras Not washing your favourite bra frequently? That lacy bra is probably made of odor trapping fabrics and it touches your skin in more than one sweat-prone place. You probably need to wash it more often than you think, and neglecting to do so will cause odor. Foods I'm sure you have heard time and time again that the smell of garlic and onions, once broken down in the blood stream, will come out through your mouth, sweat and urine. Now those aren't just the only foods. There's also broccoli, Brussels sprouts and other members of the cruciferous family that also contain a smelly compound. Diabetes Without enough insulin, the body starts to break down fat for fuel, which leads to a build-up of ketones (chemicals that the body creates when it breaks down fat to use for energy) in the body. That build-up may produce a change in body odor. Some people also report a similar change in body odor when switching to a diet heavy in meat and low in carbs. A low-carb diet is known to impact the smell of your breath. Continue reading >>

7 Effective Solutions For Body Odor

7 Effective Solutions For Body Odor

Here's some news that might surprise you: Body odor does not just come from the underarms; it can originate anywhere there are sebaceous (oil) and sweat glands—which includes the scalp, genitals, feet, and even nipples! Sweat itself doesn't actually stink; the unpleasant smell is believed to develop when bacteria that are naturally found on the skin start to break down sweat, explains Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. While a daily shower, change of clothes, and swipe of deodorant do the trick for most people, those who perspire excessively (hyperhidrosis), have certain illnesses (like diabetes), or prefer to steer clear of aluminum-based antiperspirants may have a harder time getting rid of the stench. If that sounds like you, don't despair: You're not doomed to walk around feeling like Pig-Pen. Read on for some smart fixes. (In as little as 30 days, you can be a whole lot slimmer, way more energetic, and so much healthier just by following the simple, groundbreaking plan in The Thyroid Cure!) Less sweat usually translates to less odor, simply because there's less moisture to mix with the bacteria. If you've tried prescription-strength antiperspirants but are still soaking through your shirts, you might benefit from getting Botox injections under your arms (and perhaps on your palms). This treatment temporarily blocks the chemical that activates the body's sweat glands so you sweat up to 87% less for 4 months to a year. You know that foods and spices with strong scents like onion, garlic, and curry can mess with your breath, but the odor can also come through your pores for hours after you've eaten. If you're eating a bland diet and still struggling with BO, Zeichner s Continue reading >>

What Can I Do About My Strong Body Odor?

What Can I Do About My Strong Body Odor?

(1) Hey Alice, What can be done about excessive body odor? I shower every day, yet sometimes, I catch a whiff of myself and it isn't pleasant. Skunky (2) Hi Alice, I work out very regularly, and when I do, I sweat — probably worse than a man. The sweating isn't what bothers me, it's the strong amount of body odor I put out — to the point that I'm soaking my workout clothes because I can't get the dirty "sweat" smell out of them. Is this a pH balance issue?? Is there anything I can do/eat/drink to make myself less offensive (to even myself)?? Any information would be greatly appreciated. Dear Skunky and Reader, Body aroma is natural, normal, and universal. However, like many bodily traits, our aromas are highly variable from person to person, and even from day to day. A number of factors may contribute to your odor (offensive or not), including: Genetics Foods such as garlic, onions, curry, and other strong spices Alcohol Tobacco Caffeine, from coffee, tea, soda, and chocolate Dietary imbalance in magnesium and/or zinc Diabetes, specifically low blood sugar Menopause Kidney or liver disease Stress Certain synthetic or "non-breathable" fabrics Do any of these sound familiar to you? If so, your first step may be trying to eliminate or manage the culpable factor(s). Depending on the cause, you may be able to eliminate it from your life (such as cutting out or cutting down on garlic or coffee), or you may need to visit a health care provider to learn how to manage the issue (if you suspect something such as diabetes or other medical conditions). Of course, certain factors, such as genetics, can't be changed or managed. In this case, here are a few tips for keeping odor at bay: Shower daily with deodorant soap that has antibacterial properties. Use deodorant or deodorant/ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Are you diabetic? Does your body emanate bad breath which it has never done before? Do not worry. You are not the only one experiencing something of this sort. The high level of blood glucose combined with many complications in diabetes tends to cause body odor in the patients. In this article, we shall analyze the reasons and the relationship between diabetes and body odor. Join in for the article Body Odor and Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?” What is Diabetes Body Odor? Diabetes body odor refers to the sudden change of smell that you experience due to diabetes. There are several reasons why diabetes might lead to bad odor in the patients. There are two main types of sweat one of which could be responsible for the bad body odor in a diabetes patient. One of these sweats is called eccrine which is essentially odorless and is mainly responsible for controlling the temperature of the body. The second of these sweats is known as the apocrine. This is the sweat you generally get under your armpits and is secreted by the apocrine gland. This is the one which is mainly responsible for producing bad odor as when it gets hit by bacteria, there is an unpleasant smell that is emitted. The following paragraph explains in detail the causes of bad odor in diabetes patients. Causes of Body Odor in Diabetes There are several reasons and ways in which diabetes can cause body odor in the patients. These reasons and causes of the same are explained in the following points: People with diabetes are known to be affected by a number of complications in the body. One such complication is the infection that can be caused in the urinary tract of the patient. This may very much lead to a fruity smell in the diabetes patients. Another reason for the bad odor could be the high levels o Continue reading >>

Body Odour

Body Odour

Body odour is the unpleasant smell produced by bacteria on the skin that break down the acids in your sweat. The medical term is bromhidrosis. Anyone who has reached puberty can produce body odour, as this is when the apocrine sweat glands develop, which produce the sweat that bacteria can quickly break down. Men are more likely to have body odour, because they tend to sweat more than women. Things that can make body odour worse include: being overweight consuming rich or spicy food and drink – such as garlic, spices and alcohol certain medical conditions – a fruity smell can sometimes be a sign of diabetes, while a bleach-like smell may indicate liver or kidney disease Excessive sweating Hyperhidrosis is a condition where a person sweats excessively and much more than the body needs to regulate temperature. If you have hyperhidrosis, you may also have smelly feet (bromodosis). Smelly feet are caused by wearing shoes and socks that prevent sweat evaporating or being absorbed, which attracts bacteria. When to see your GP See your GP if: your sweating or body odour is causing you distress you notice a change in your body odour you suddenly begin to sweat much more than usual Managing body odour Excessive sweating and body odour is an unpleasant problem that can affect a person's confidence and self-esteem. A body odour problem can usually be managed by getting rid of excess skin bacteria – which are responsible for the smell – and keeping the skin in the affected area (usually the armpits) clean and dry. Self-care advice Your armpits contain a large number of apocrine glands, which are responsible for producing body odour. Keeping your armpits clean and free of bacteria will help keep odour under control. Following the below advice can help you achieve this: take Continue reading >>

What's To Know About Body Odor?

What's To Know About Body Odor?

Body odor is the perceived unpleasant smell our bodies can give off when bacteria that live on the skin break down sweat into acids. Some say it is the smell of bacteria growing on the body, but it is actually the result of bacteria breaking down protein into certain acids. It is also known as B.O., bromhidrosis, osmidrosis, or ozochrotia. What is body odor? When a body gives off a scent others may find unpleasant, it is known as body odor. Body odor usually becomes evident if measures are not taken when a human reaches puberty. People who are obese, those who regularly eat spicy foods, as well as individuals with certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, are more susceptible to having body odor. People who sweat too much, such as those with hyperhidrosis, may also be susceptible to body odor. However, often the salt level of their sweat is too high for the bacteria to break down. It depends on where the excess sweating is occurring and which type of sweat glands are involved. Sweat itself is virtually odorless to humans. It is the rapid multiplication of bacteria in the presence of sweat and their breaking down of sweat into acids that eventually causes the unpleasant smell. Body odor is most likely to occur in the following places: feet groin armpits genitals pubic hair and other hair belly button anus behind the ears the rest of the skin, to a lesser extent Body odor can have a pleasant and specific smell to the individual and can be used to identify people, especially by dogs and other animals. Each person's unique body odor can be influenced by diet, gender, health, and medication. Causes Body odor is caused by bacteria breaking down sweat and is largely linked to the apocrine glands. Most body odor comes from these. These glands are found in the breasts, genit Continue reading >>

Does Your Breath Smell Like Nail Polish Remover? You Could Have Diabetes: Doctors Reveal What Different Illnesses Smell Like

Does Your Breath Smell Like Nail Polish Remover? You Could Have Diabetes: Doctors Reveal What Different Illnesses Smell Like

These scents could soon be picked up by 'electronic noses' From diabetes smelling like nail polish remover to liver failure smelling of raw fish, doctors say diseases could eventually be diagnosed just using smell. They say that the breath of people with diabetes has been reported to smell of nail varnish remover, while that of those with liver disease can smell of raw fish. And even if the smell is too subtle to be detected by humans, it could soon be picked up by ‘electronic noses’. The researchers, who published their findings in the journal Sensors, also explain that a bladder infection can make the urine smell of ammonia and rubella can make the sweat smell of freshly plucked feathers. Schizophrenia can make the sweat smell of vinegar and typhoid makes the skin smell like freshly baked bread, the BBC reports. Finally, yellow fever can make the skin smell like a butcher's shop and scrofula - a lymph node infection - can make a patient smell of stale beer. Diabetes can make the breath smell of nail varnish remover. Liver failure can make the breath smell of raw fish. A bladder infection can cause the patient's urine to smell of ammonia. Rubella can make the sweat smell of freshly plucked feathers. Schizophrenia can make the sweat smell of vinegar. Typhoid makes the skin smell like freshly baked bread. Yellow fever can make the skin smell like a butcher's shop. Scrofula - a lymph node infection - can make a patient smell of stale beer. Within the last week researchers have also discovered that machines can ‘sniff out’ breast cancer and that they are just as effective as a mammogram. One patient even claims that she was is able to detect the smell of cancer herself. Joanie wrote on an online forum that when her husband was suffering from prostate cancer, and wh Continue reading >>

How To Reduce Unusual Body Odors Associated With Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infection (uti)

How To Reduce Unusual Body Odors Associated With Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infection (uti)

Diabetes can produce a body odor that is much more different than what you are used to. A sudden change in body odor is never a good thing, unless you have recently switched your diet or have been eating foods like eggs, onions, garlic, liver, fish, red meat, legumes, processed foods, curry, fried foods, or spicy foods in over-excess. If your diet has not changed, but your body odor has, it is wise to see your doctor as soon as possible. Body odor is usually described as the smell of sweat; however, this is only almost true. Sweat is odorless. Our body produce two types of sweat. The first is eccrine. This is an odorless, clear sweat that is secreted all over our bodies by the eccrine glands. This type of sweat regulates the body's temperature. The second type of sweat is apocrine. This is a thicker, fattier sweat secreted in the underarm and groin areas by the apocrine glands. This type of sweat serves no actual purpose. It's something we have not evolved from yet. Apocrine sweat is odorless until it reacts with bacteria on the skin's surface. Then, it become that unpleasant aroma we all try avoid. Some people smell more than others due to heredity or poor hygiene. Diabetes can also change the way your body odor smells. Diabetes and people with urinary tract infections will sometimes produce a different kind of body odor. It is a sweet-smelling, almost fruity body odor. Full-blown, uncorrected diabetes can lead to ketoacidosis. When this occurs, the skin of the patient will actually taste sweet and produces an unmistakable pungent odor. Diabetes can also cause an acetone like smell in body odor in the patient from the insulin taken to treat the disease. To control your odor, you can practice the basics of any type of body odor treatment. Maintain good hygiene, using an Continue reading >>

What Your Body Odor Means About You

What Your Body Odor Means About You

Most Americans spend at least a portion of every day trying to prevent body odor – showering, applying deodorant and even sniffing their armpits to detect any trace of an off-putting smell. For most people, body odor is completely normal; it’s the simple result of the interaction between sweat and bacteria on a person’s skin. “Body odor doesn’t necessarily signify anything, and you know a lot of our perceptions of body odor have to do with society norms,” Dr. Joshua Zeichner, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, told FoxNews.com. But while the average person can easily control his or her body odor with proper hygiene, for others it isn’t so simple. Do some diseases make body odor worse? Certain rare diseases can alter the way a person’s body odor smells, according to George Preti, an organic chemist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center, who focuses on the nature and origin of human odors. One such condition is trimethylaminuria (TMAU), which affects just 1 in 200,000 people. “Metabolic diseases like trimethylaminuria will lend a very different odor to the individual,” Preti said. “It’s out of the ordinary. In the bad cases, the individual will produce a rotting fish or garbage-y smell perceptible at social distances.” This rare condition is characterized by the body’s inability to properly metabolize trimethylamine, a byproduct of gut metabolism. As a result, individuals with TMAU develop an excess of trimethylamine within their body, causing them to give off a strange odor. TMAU is typically diagnosed in young people, and unusual body odor is the primary outward symptom of the disease. Other metabolic conditions, like advanced kidney and l Continue reading >>

How Your Smell Can Reveal If You're Sick

How Your Smell Can Reveal If You're Sick

Cancer cells are thought to release compounds that differ from healthy cells, enabling the detection of a change in smell, potentially at early stages of development. At this level of subtlety, however, the human nose is ruled out. Dogs' greater sense of smell is being harnessed instead. Subtle differences occur in body odor when someone is sick or infected, changing their odors from pleasant to aversive. When picked up by others, these differences can inform them to protect themselves and avoid becoming infected. The change in odor is thought to be caused by activation of the body's immune system in response to a new infection. Scientists at the Karolinska institute in Sweden injected volunteers with a compound mimicking the presence of bacteria, and changes in smell were detected. Everyone has their own "odorprint" made up of select compounds combining to release a unique odor. But this scent is based on various factors including age, gender and health. Several diseases have been discovered to have signature scents: People with typhoid fever are said to smell like baked bread, people with yellow fever smell like a butcher's shop, and those with the glandular disease scrofula smell like stale beer. Pictured, a patient with typhoid fever. Odors are release not just from skin but also breath, blood and urine. Recent studies at the Karolinska Institute further revealed that the smell of urine is affected by inflammation processes within the body. Urine could therefore distinguish between the healthy and unhealthy. Cancer cells are thought to release compounds that differ from healthy cells, enabling the detection of a change in smell, potentially at early stages of development. At this level of subtlety, however, the human nose is ruled out. Dogs' greater sense of smell i Continue reading >>

How To Fight Body Odor

How To Fight Body Odor

Body odor is a normal phenomenon, and it isn't really much of a problem under normal circumstances. Excessive or unpleasant body odor can also be extremely common however and this can be a source of great discomfort to others and a source of extreme embarrassment to the concerned individual. While all of us have had the unpleasant experience of being subjected to someone else's foul body odor, you very often don't realize it when the source of that foul smell is yourself. Body odor that is extremely strong can prove to be a source of great embarrassment to an individual and severely damage self-confidence. People who are aware that they have a body odor problem tend to avoid or minimize social interaction and contact with others, at the work place or even in their private lives. Although the problem of body odor may be non-threatening and seem trivial enough, the implications of the condition are therefore a lot more far reaching. If you are plagued with a strong body odor or underarm body odor you need not panic and throw your hands up in despair though. There are plenty of body odor remedies for women and men that can help save you and those around you from a lot of unnecessary discomfort. While the use of deodorants and body sprays can help minimize or camouflage the presence of body odor smell, these methods are not always very effective, and don't really solve the problem. They can simply help mask it to some extent. It is important to understand what causes body odor as this will help to prevent body odor from becoming a problem. There are a lot of misconceptions that people have when it comes to body odor, and a common belief is that perspiration is the cause and source of the foul smell. Sweat in reality however is odorless. Body odor is caused by the activity o Continue reading >>

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