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Diabetes Blogs Type 1

34 Diabetes Bloggers Give Us A Glimpse Of Behind The Scenes

34 Diabetes Bloggers Give Us A Glimpse Of Behind The Scenes

Writing is not everyones strongest feat. Those who can convey a story, a lesson learnt, or a memoir through their writing are not only storytellers but also educators. Bloggers and advocates who write about diabetes are just that. Through their stories and experiences, they share with us a vulnerable part of them in order to get a message across just in case it can help someone else who may be in their shoes. Its their way of saying you are not alone in your journey!. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. We reached out to 34 amazing bloggers and advocates of diabetes to share with us their thoughts and to invite readers into the world of ideas, thoughts, and personal sphere. They share with us their hardest diabetes related topic they had to write about, some of the techniques they use to draw readers interest, and some equally interesting comments and questions they have gotten in the past about their articles. All these bloggers have a main goal: to raise awareness and to educate us about the journey one is on with diabetes . What is the hardest diabetes blog subject that you had to write? What are some of the best techniques that you use in order to create a story to draw the reader in, and also help keep their attention while they learn about diabetes? What are some of the most interesting comments or questions that you have had in relation to your articles about diabetes A1: It can be challenging having people understand there is no magical diabetes dietpeople have a hard time believing that they can enjoy their favorite foods as long as they substitute in Continue reading >>

10 Must-follow Diabetes Accounts On Instagram From Around The World

10 Must-follow Diabetes Accounts On Instagram From Around The World

back to Overview Most people are living their lives with diabetes out in the open these days. No more ducking into the bathroom to take a shot or check blood sugars. That's a great thing! Social media has a lot to do with this revolution and Instagram is at the forefront of the movement. Thankfully, there are a bunch of people getting really creative about diabetes alongside the everyday situations we deal with. We love getting lost in the visual imagery of diabetes and thought you might also enjoy some of the accounts that delight our eyeballs. Enjoy! Sugarsanity Bing Shin Chia is a fun person in Malaysia living with type 1 diabetes. She’s got a great sense of humor and her pics are usually colorful and make you smile. Bryanna Bryanna blogs at ‘Hope, Love, Insulin’ and shares pictures of her daily life with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Daily Grind Ryan and Amber host a fun blog and podcast about the real-life grind of life with diabetes. Bonus points if you can find the episode where Amber burps on air… Ashley Ng Ashley is a diabetes blogger and dietitian in Australia who’s working on her PhD and doing a lot of cool stuff. She’s written a post on our blog that you might also enjoy. Cathy Van de Moortele Cathy is a diabetes blogger in Belgium. The beautiful pictures of her meals look so good… I spent some time with her a few years ago and she’s a real treat. Beyond Type 1 Beyond Type 1 features great pictures with quotes and statements from others living with diabetes. You can submit yours too (learn more)! Team Novo Nordisk The official Instagram account for Team Novo Nordisk. Did you know their pro cycling team is the only professional sports team in the whole world made up entirely of people with type 1 diabetes? Brickabetes The ups and downs of everyday Continue reading >>

Living Positively: D-mom Of 4 Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Living Positively: D-mom Of 4 Children With Type 1 Diabetes

On the surface, Elissa Renouf looks like your typical mother of five beautiful, happy, healthy, well-loved children, four boys and one girl, ages 13 to 21. Digging further, you’ll learn their family’s life is a little more complicated than others – four children with type 1 diabetes (two with celiac disease), and one child with epilepsy and suspected brain tumor. Even with the constant on going management of the health issues they’ve been handed, they’ve never lost determination to live as positive as possible. Q. Tell us what it’s like being a D-Mom to four children with diabetes, and one without? A. It’s a full time job, but having five kids in general is a full time job. Charlie was my first child diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2002, at the age of three. My responsibility helping manage my children’s diabetes was a general progression, and every eight months, it seemed like another child had a diagnosis. I wanted a positive, stress-free life for myself and children, so had no other way but to learn to manage and accept it. Q. How do you help each of them manage their diabetes? How does it differ from the next child? A. It is important for my children to manage their diabetes self-sufficiently, so I had each of them involved in their management from day one. The more they understood how to manage their diabetes, the better control they could have so they could grow into happier, healthier adults. I taught them how to count their carbs and the glycemic index in food, and that if they wanted food, they would also need insulin. Empowering them to manage their diabetes gave them the confidence to make sound diabetes management decisions the rest of their lives. Q. With four children with diabetes, how do you keep track of their blood sugar trends and di Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Occurs when the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes develops most often in young people but can appear in adults. PubMed Health Glossary (Source: NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) About Type 1 Diabetes Diabetes is a metabolic disease that affects many different parts of the body. Depending on the type of diabetes, the body either cannot produce insulin itself (Type 1) or is unable to use the insulin it produces properly (Type 2). Insulin is a hormone, a chemical messenger that is transported in the blood and regulates important body functions. Without insulin your body cannot get the energy it needs from the food you have eaten. This vital hormone is usually produced in the pancreas and released into the bloodstream. Here it enables the sugar (glucose) in our food and drink to be transported into our cells and converted into energy for our bodies. Without insulin our bodies cannot use the sugar in our blood, so the sugar builds up there. Very high blood sugar concentrations cause a number of symptoms. In people who have type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce any insulin, or only produces very little insulin. This means they have to inject insulin every day to get the insulin they are lacking. Insulin therapy prevents dangerous fluctuations in blood sugar levels and protects people with diabetes from the effects of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. And good treatment can help to prevent the development of complications that can arise if your blood sugar levels are too high... Read more about Type 1 Diabetes There are increasing numbers of people living with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The main aim of treatme Continue reading >>

Arthritis On A Diabetes Blog

Arthritis On A Diabetes Blog

When it comes to living with both Type 1 diabetes and arthritis, I don’t experience the amount of pain and disability that burdens some of my favorite people in the DOC. Rick Phillips who deals with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis shared his story on my blog a couple of years ago. Rick tirelessly advocates for people with diabetes, but he often admits that arthritis negatively impacts his life much more than diabetes. Molly Schreiber has had Type 1 diabetes for 28 years. Her rheumatoid arthritis is a formidable opponent and she deals with the worst that RA can dish out. In general I am doing okay when it comes to living with arthritis. Except when I’m not…. ********* I am good at diabetes. I am bad at arthritis. I have had a tough summer. Although I was diagnosed diagnosed with inflammatory spondyloarthropathy over 10 years ago, my problems are peripheral. My hands hurt and my thumb joints are shot. In May I woke up with horrible heel and foot pain which continues to get worse despite following doctor’s orders. I don’t write about arthritis very often because I am a diabetes blogger. Type 1 diabetes is a constant in my life and I do little without taking diabetes into account. After 40+ years of T1, I have no major D-complications. At the same time diabetes is a “needy condition” that requires constant affirmation and is entrenched in my psyche. More than once I have mentioned that I deal with other inflammatory and autoimmune conditions in addition to diabetes. I once wrote about a skin problem called annulare granuloma and mentioned that I felt helpless in dealing with it because “When you have Type 1 diabetes, you get used to the idea that WHAT I DO MAKES A DIFFERENCE in my health.” I’ve never bothered writing about hypothyroidism Continue reading >>

What It’s Like When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Like When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Leah, a beautiful little girl I call my niece, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) this summer. She had been napping multiple times a day, soaking through diapers in an hour. She was begging for water all day long. Her parents knew something was wrong, but they had no idea it would be this serious. When the doctor called with Leah’s urine test results, they told her parents to rush to the hospital, where they spent the next three days having their lives flipped upside down and all around. Leah is 2 years old. The first time I saw her after her diagnosis, I got a picture of just what this family is dealing with. We were out to eat and were all deciding what to order. Leah’s mother googled the carb counts for Leah’s favorite lunch: mozzarella sticks. Then they tested her sugar, which meant pricking her for a few drops of blood. Then they calculated how much insulin she needed. Finally, they gave her insulin, pricking her again, just so she could eat her lunch. Our server took a long time to bring the food. With that came the worrying they might have given her the insulin too early and her sugar would drop too low before the food arrived. Leah’s type 1 diabetes is hard on her Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is nothing like type 2. T1D can’t be prevented. It is unrelated to your diet. Researchers still don’t completely understand what causes it. When you have T1D, your pancreas either stops functioning fully or entirely, causing you to rely on insulin to regulate your blood sugar. It can have serious complications if not treated properly. Leah is doing well, but her life has changed forever. She can only be left with caregivers who are trained to take care of her. For now, when she’s a toddler, this part is no big deal. But as she gets older, play dates, field trip Continue reading >>

Top 30 Type 1 Diabetes Blogs To Follow In 2017

Top 30 Type 1 Diabetes Blogs To Follow In 2017

Being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes is difficult enough, the realization of how much your life has changed, even more difficult. These Top 30 blogs open the door to the lives of real life people also living with the condition. Here they are in no particular order: Kerri, the writer of this blog, renders a fresh and very relatable perspective on living with type 1 diabetes. Her approach to diabetes does not describe it as the chronic ailment it is, but as a condition that can be managed while living a very normal life. Her blog provides articles from travel tips on how to pack luggage as a diabetic to diet. There’s no greater challenge; than the Joy of having a baby, only to have her diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes shortly after. This blog sheds a lot of light on being non-diabetic parents with a diabetic toddler. Hallie the writer of this blog, relates how a family unit can work as team in caring for a diabetic child. Diagnosed since 1980; and not a medical expert. Scott uses his experience, vast exposure and work in the diabetic field as a communication lead, speaker, writer, advocate and co-host for DSMA live, to relay resourceful and highly qualified information on Diabetes. Don’t be alarmed by the title, it literally means what it says! Kim the writer of this blog, gives an avid description on the gadgets or more accurately insulin pumps she has used over the years and the one she currently uses that allows her TEXT her pancreas! Alexis is the quintessential advocate for Type I Diabetes and a public speaker. Unapologetically herself, she has a strong point of view on the stigma that comes with living as a diabetic. She shares interesting encounters in her daily life as a diabetic, saying it as it is. Not many young adults are eager to share their lives when suff Continue reading >>

12 Diabetes Blogs You Should Be Reading

12 Diabetes Blogs You Should Be Reading

We spend a lot of time reading blogs and news stories to stay on top of what’s going on in the DOC (diabetes online community). Because of that, we’ve piled up our RSS reader with tons of great articles and have found some bloggers that really stick out above the rest. Here’s 12 diabetes blogs that you should be reading on a regular basis, in no particular order. 1. Six Until Me (www.sixuntilme.com) – The brainchild of Kerri Sparling, Six Until Me is a first person account of life with diabetes. Kerri started the blog after getting frustrated by not being able to find any resources that spoke positively about life with diabetes. Six Until Me helped pave the way for the larger network of diabetes focused blogs today. 2. Diabetes Mine (www.diabetesmine.com) – Diabetes Mine is a community of PWDs that covers almost every facet of life with diabetes. They have facts about diabetes, tips for management, interviews and write-ups about celebrities with diabetes, as well as diabetes product reviews and research papers. 3. Insulin Nation (www.insulinnation.com) – Insulin Nation is a great resource for the PWD community and focuses entirely on diabetes therapy, covering news and research about insulin and insulin related products and technology. 4. A Sweet Life (– A Sweet Life was started by a couple, Mike and Jessica, after they were both diagnosed with T1D. Their blog has grown tremendously and features staples like diabetes-friendly recipes, diet tips, and news. They’ve also got a great section of personal blogs covering diabetes from almost every perspective – college students, young adults, endurance trainers, parents, and seniors. 5. Scott’s Diabetes (– Run by Scott K. Johnson, this blog covers the personal aspects of managing T1D, along with some gene Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life Of Type 1 Diabetes

A Day In The Life Of Type 1 Diabetes

Unless you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, it’s hard to imagine the daily vigilance that is required to manage the disease. In the first installment of a new New York Times video series, you can get a glimpse of a day with Type 1 through the experiences of teenager Dominique Corozzo. The 16-year-old has been adjusting to living with Type 1 diabetes and discusses the challenges of her diagnosis and how she copes every day with the disease. For more information about research trials involving Type 1 diabetes, go to the National Institutes of Health TrialNet website. For more information about the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, featured in the video, go to www.nbdiabetes.org. Continue reading >>

Living Beyond

Living Beyond

This week's tweet chat was all about living beyond Diabetes and how we live beyond. The first question was all about if we see diabetes as a barrier, if we see it as something that stops us from achieving our dreams and it's safe to say that was a unanimous no. Most of us do not see it as a barrier and in fact a lot of us see it as something that spurs us on to do better, to prove people wrong, to prove that actually we can do anything we set our minds to despite having diabetes. The thing about living with Type 1 Diabetes is that it's 24/7, it doesn't stop and we can't take a break from it, so Type 1 can have an affect on your general life let alone trying to live beyond and do amazing things. However, for the people who achieve incredible things like running marathons with Type 1 or scaling mountains, Type 1 diabetes is irrelevant. It's a challenge, it's an extra precaution but in the grand scheme of things, in the bigger picture, Type 1 diabetes is not a barrier. In fact, it makes the achievement even sweeter, because you did it all while proving Type 1 Diabetes cannot stop you. You will however, not find me up a mountain, not because I have Type 1 Diabetes but because I'm lazy and I hate heights, and that was the general consensus with a lot of us who don't harbour the desire to be adrenaline junkies or do extraordinary things, it's not Type 1 that stops us...it's our character as people, ha ha. We also got into a discussion about personal achievements. I think it's really easy to forget that everything is relative, and people's circumstances are different and living beyond your circumstances alone can be an achievement. What may be something really insignificant to one person, might be really significant to another and to the person achieving it. You don't have to Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Diabetes Blogs

The 10 Best Diabetes Blogs

Living with diabetes can be a challenging burden. But it can be helpful to share your frustrations and successes, and read about people's similar experiences. We have identified the best diabetes blogs that aim to inspire, empower, and educate readers. Diabetes is a group of diseases that impact how the body uses blood glucose, and it affects around 29.1 million people in the United States. Having type 1 diabetes means that the body does not produce enough insulin, and the condition is more commonly diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. But having type 2 diabetes means that the body cannot use insulin properly, and this type is more common in individuals over the age of 40 years. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all diagnosed diabetes cases. Keeping on top of your diabetes treatment plan can be a round-the-clock commitment that may feature blood sugar monitoring, medications and insulin, healthy eating, and regular physical activity. Medical News Today have rounded up the top 10 diabetes blogs, based on the quality of their information, helpful tips, recipes, fitness advice, and personal accounts. Speaking of Diabetes Speaking of Diabetes is the blog of the Joslin Diabetes Center. The Joslin Diabetes Center is a research and teaching affiliate of the Harvard Medical School. Their team of more than 300 scientists is dedicated to finding innovative pathways to prevent, treat, and cure type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While in pursuit of a world without diabetes, Joslin is helping to improve the lives of individuals with diabetes through patient education programs and care provided by their highly specialized and multi-skilled team. Speaking of Diabetes is designed for people with diabetes, as well as for their friends and family. Recent posts include tips for barbec Continue reading >>

Travelling Prepared With Diabetes

Travelling Prepared With Diabetes

I spent my final days of 2017 feeling under the weather. Which is a mild improvement on last year, when Dad grazed the back of his head on a running ceiling fan while changing a light globe, but that’s a whole other story… At the time of year where I wanted nothing more than to enjoy leftover cheesecake, munch on Nonna’s biscotti and sip on icy cold percolated coffees, I was devoid of all my appetite. I could feel bloating, wind and a great deal of discomfort in my stomach. As I thought back to Christmas Day, I honestly felt that I hadn’t done anything extremely out of the ordinary. Our family brekkie of bacon, eggs and grilled tomato, with Baileys and a few choccies was nothing out of the ordinary. I only picked a few of the more tempting options for dinner at my Uncle’s place, rather than attempting to try everything and then feel the food and high blood sugar coma for the remainder of the night. There were a few small blips throughout the day, but the highest I could remember my blood sugar peaking at was 13mmol. I was feeling super proud of myself at the conclusion of Christmas Day. Two days after Christmas, I was left with next to no explanation for my symptoms. I went without dinner, and breakfast the following morning. I had a few water crackers for lunch, before finally feeling able to manage small meals. I was shit scared to give any insulin until I’d actually stomached anything, for fear I would be forced to finish something I physically couldn’t. I even remember suspending my basal rate to bring myself away from a very minor hypo, because I really did not want to eat a glucose tab. However when the symptoms still hadn’t passed by the weekend of New Year’s, I began to think about the implications of my diabetes. The rational side of my brain Continue reading >>

We're More Than Diabetes

We're More Than Diabetes

I sit here alone in the middle of Indiana. It pounds against my mind, begging for me to work through the feelings of anger, love, gratefulness, and fear. The stories of Diabetic lives swirl around me. At times they can overwhelm my senses and put my busyness on pause. In this moment I quiet my mind and ponder the last 20 years. The blood, the tears, the triumphs, the numbers…all of it replaying in subdued black and white. I see the history of my family and the impact of friendships and unconditional love. It’s impossible to box up all my emotions in one tidy blog post. Diabetes has been a constant companion, yet my history is so much richer than the worry it imparts. My history includes four children. Little boys who danced and ran and laughed with tears streaming down their faces. Forty perfect toes, and eight bright eyes that have been through hell and back. A hell that has very little to do with Diabetes. As I take in the pictures and turn them from black and white to color, I don’t see insulin pumps. I don’t see test strips. I don’t see sleepless nights. I see boys who are human and are trying to make sense of all the chaos life has to offer. I see them walking as steady as possible in treacherous winds. But with all of it, so many more blessings. J is the most loving young man I know. He still holds my hand. His hugs are never-ending. He’s been knocked down so many times as he’s sorted through everything, and yet he gets up again and again. B is a force. He’s a whirlwind of empathy and care wrapped in the persona of a grumpy old man. He feels everything harder than everyone else, and desperately tries to hold it all in. L is a miracle. He has overcome so many obstacles and is wise beyond his years. He’s kind. He’s sweetness from head to toe. And Continue reading >>

My Favorite Type 1 Diabetes Blogs

My Favorite Type 1 Diabetes Blogs

I live in a bubble most of the time. I get along all right knowing what I know, living how I know how to live and plugging along day after day with my eyes right in front of me. It’s deceptively comfortable having blinders up, dealing with things on my own. But sometimes, I desperately need a different viewpoint, to see what other people experience. Blogs are a perfect way to get that extra dose of perspective! There are so many amazing type 1 diabetes blogs out there, but here are three of my favorites. Deathofapancreas.com Joanne writes a fantastic blog about her little girl Elise. I immediately was drawn to Joanne’s writing because I felt like I could relate well with her. Seeing her sweet little Elise pictured on the blog reminds me so much of my Kaitlyn. Another reason I love this blog is that Joanne talks a lot about different technology options. They’ve tried all kinds of different meters, pumps and CGM systems — some they’ve stuck with, and some they have not. As a mom who looks forward to using more of these kinds of systems, I find reading about her experiences with them invaluable! Ourdiabeticlife.com Meri is a mom of four boys, and three of them have type 1 diabetes. Three! That alone was enough to pull me in to find out about her story. As if that’s not enough for her to handle, her husband is also battling cancer. It brings me close to tears when I read it. She talks about how she copes and where she turns for hope and peace. She’s truly an inspiration. Theprincessandthepump.com First of all, how cute is that? Princess and the Pump… darling! Hallie writes about her dear little Sweetpea. She’s a 6-year-old girl who recently had her third “diaversary.” Once again, I’m drawn to Hallie’s writing because it mirrors my own roller coaste Continue reading >>

What It’s Really Like To Have A Child With Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Really Like To Have A Child With Type 1 Diabetes

I have two daughters with Type 1 diabetes, and in my experience there’s a disconnect between what people think it’s like to have Type 1 diabetes and what it actually is like. Many people are not aware of all the variables that come into play to control blood sugars. Some people think you take your medicine and you get a steady blood glucose of 120. In reality, you have to guess what the dose of your insulin is based on your guess of what the carbs in the food are based on what your guess is of the portion of food that will be eaten. Plus, you must take into account your guess of the amount of fat and protein in the food, and whether one has just exercised or is about to exercise (and how much exertion that exercise will involve). If you are about to go to sleep that must be taken into account, or if you’re going to be somewhere difficult to treat a low (such as a child on a school bus) keep that in mind as well. And don’t forget to pray that your pump infusion set is working and that your insulin didn’t fry in the heat. Now push go on your pump, or poke your arm with a needle and, voilà, you’re done! A diabetes disconnect also results from confusing headlines, such as Cure for Type 1 Discovered (it’s in mice) or New Drug for Diabetes (it’s for Type 2). Many book titles are misleading as well, often using language like ‘Reversing Diabetes’ or ‘Preventing Diabetes’ while meaning Type 2 diabetes and not Type 1. Even medical journals often don’t distinguish between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in their titles. Recently, I saw a friend whom I hadn’t seen for a long time. When I pulled out my daughters’ meters and lancets to check blood sugars, she said “I didn’t think you still had to do that.” This is not the first time I’ve heard someon Continue reading >>

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