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Diabetes Blisters

Skin Complications And Diabetes

Skin Complications And Diabetes

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin.As many as one out of three people who are living with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In fact, sometimes such problems are the first sign that a person has diabetes. Some of these problems are skin conditions anyone can have, but people with diabetes get more easily. These include bacterial infections, fungal infections and itching. Other skin problems happen mostly, or only, to people with diabetes. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters and eruptive xanthomatosis. In addition to November being American Diabetes Month, it is also National Healthy Skin Month, so it’s the perfect time to talk about the topic of skin complications and diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. Good skin care is essential and there are several things you can do to head off skin problems. First and foremost, keeping your diabetes well managed is crucial to avoiding complications. People with high glucose levels tend to have dry skin and less ability to fend off harmful bacteria. Both conditions increase the risk of infection. In addition, here are some tips on how to properly care for your skin: Keep skin clean and dry. Use talcum powder in areas where skin touches skin, such as armpits and groin. Avoid very hot baths and showers. If your skin is dry, don’t use bubble baths. Moisturizing soaps may help. Afterward, use a standard skin lotion, but don’t put lotions between toes. The extra moisture there can encourage fungus to grow. Prevent dry skin. Scratching dry or itchy skin can open it up and allow infection to set in. Moisturize your skin to prevent chapping, Continue reading >>

Proper Care For Foot Blisters

Proper Care For Foot Blisters

Regular foot checks will help minimize your risk of foot ulcers. While foot blisters are simply a nuisance for some, they can lead to serious complications for people with diabetes. Due to decreased circulation and feeling in many diabetic patient’s extremities, it’s possible for a blister to become a diabetic ulcer. With the proper treatment, your chances of developing an ulcer can be minimized. What causes blisters? Simply put, friction causes blisters, but not necessarily by the shoe rubbing on the outside layer of skin. The skin on your foot moving relative to the underlying bone is called shear. When shear happens excessively in one place, the tissue tears and fluid fills the injury site. So, you got a blister Clean it thoroughly with warm water and soap, and sanitize it with rubbing alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. Do this at night when you’ll be off your feet to allow for proper air circulation. Put antibiotic ointment on the area and cover it with a bandage or dressing, especially if you’re putting shoes back on. If you aren’t putting shoes back on, take the pressure off of your feet. This will prevent your feet from swelling. Wait as long as you can to put shoes back on, reducing the friction on the blister, ensuring that the roof doesn’t tear off of it. Many people wonder if they should pop a blister. While it isn’t necessary, it’s usually safe to pop a small, clear blister. This can be done with a sterilized needle or pin. Do not pop it if your blister is large. This will cause a large opening in the skin, potentially allowing bacteria to enter the wound. It could become a diabetic foot ulcer it it’s not handled properly. If it’s large enough that it’s hard to walk, you should see a doctor. As with all wounds, severe redness and pus are sig Continue reading >>

Shoe Lacing Techniques To Reduce Friction Blisters

Shoe Lacing Techniques To Reduce Friction Blisters

We know shear forces (friction) causes blisters, which leads to foot ulcers in people with diabetes and neuropathy. There are a couple shoe lacing techniques I’d like to share with you to help reduce the friction in your shoes. If you have a high arch foot type, the top of your foot may rub against the tongue of the shoe. For this situation, I recommend feeling the top of your foot while it’s in the shoe for the prominence. Then re-do the laces so they skip the holes nearest the foot prominence. This puts less pressure on the foot in that area. If our shoes are not laced tight enough, the foot slips back and forth inside the shoe. If it slips enough, the toe can jam into the front of the shoe cause problems with the toenail, and the heel can jam the back of the shoe causing thick calluses. The key is to tie the laces tighter near the ankle. Basketball shoes and hiking boots are also great at locking the ankle into the shoe. Heel Lock Lacing Technique Some shoes, particularly running shoes, have extra holes at the top to allow a heel lock lacing technique. This is a stronger hold around the ankle than tying a regular knot. Create loops on each side with the laces going through the extra holes, go across and through the loop, pull up towards you to tighten, and then tie the shoe like you would normally. If you’re confused on how to do this, there are tons of great videos on youtube.com, just look up “heel lock lacing”. Usually shoes are well padded around the ankle. If you have diabetes and neuropathy and decide to try these techniques, check your feet frequently in the beginning to make sure it’s not causing a new problem. With that said, the overwhelming majority of diabetic foot problems are from shoes that are too loose, wearing slippers, or even going bar Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot Problems And Foot Care

Diabetes: Foot Problems And Foot Care

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S People with diabetes are at risk for foot problems. This handout explains why these problems occur and what you can do to protect your feet. Why are foot problems so common in people with diabetes? In people with diabetes, high blood glucose can cause two complications — both of which can result in foot problems. You may have one or both of these: • Nerve damage (neuropathy). Nerve damage from high blood glucose usually begins in the hands and feet. It can cause painful symptoms — tingling, aching, or throbbing — but it can also reduce sensation. If you can’t really feel cold, heat, or pain in your feet, it’s easy to ignore an injury or infection. And unfortunately, in people with diabetes, even a small blister or stubbed toe can become serious. • Poor circulation. High blood glucose can damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow to your feet. This means that injuries take longer to heal. Over time, poor circulation in your feet can even change the shape of your feet and toes. This can cause problems with the way you walk. Are foot problems really that serious? In people with diabetes, yes — foot problems can be very serious. In the worst cases, they can lead to deformed feet, wounds that won’t heal, and serious infections that require surgery. In fact, diabetes-related foot problems are a leading reason for leg and foot amputations. Fortunately, good care can lower your chance of serious problems. Following the steps outlined at right, you and your medical caregivers can work together to care for your feet. However, the most important things are those you do (and don’t do) on your own to protect your feet. See the next page for these do Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Article

Diabetic Foot Care Article

A A A Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents several diseases in which high blood glucose levels over time can damage the nerves, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. Diabetes can also decrease the body's ability to fight infection. When diabetes is not well controlled, damage to the organs and impairment of the immune system is likely. Foot problems commonly develop in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious. With damage to the nervous system, a person with diabetes may not be able to feel his or her feet properly. Normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the foot is impaired. These factors together can lead to abnormal pressure on the skin, bones, and joints of the foot during walking and can lead to breakdown of the skin of the foot. Sores may develop. Damage to blood vessels and impairment of the immune system from diabetes make it difficult to heal these wounds. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles, and bones can then occur. These infections can develop into gangrene. Because of the poor blood flow, antibiotics cannot get to the site of the infection easily. Often, the only treatment for this is amputation of the foot or leg. If the infection spreads to the bloodstream, this process can be life-threatening. People with diabetes must be fully aware of how to prevent foot problems before they occur, to recognize problems early, and to seek the right treatment when problems do occur. Although treatment for diabetic foot problems has improved, prevention - including good control of blood sugar level - remains the best way to prevent diabetic complications. People with diabetes should learn how to examine their own feet and how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of diabetic foot problems. They should also l Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Even though it looks much the same as any other foot, the diabetic foot requires special attention. Why? Nerve damage is common with diabetes, especially in the lower extremities. Blood vessels are damaged as a result of the disease and circulation is decreased. When this happens, feet and legs tend to be cold and sores heal slowly, in some cases taking years to heal. This can easily lead to infection. Nerve damage can also decrease your ability to feel sensations in your feet, such as pain, heat, and cold. That means you may not notice a foot injury until you have a major infection. A common complaint from many people is, "My feet are killing me!" For a person with diabetes, that statement could be all too true. Loss of nerve function, especially on the soles of the feet, can reduce feeling and mask a sore or injury on the foot that, if left unattended, can turn into an ulcer or gangrene. Neuropathy, damage to the nerves, is a common problem for people with diabetes. It occurs most often in the feet and legs, and its signs include recurring burning, pain, or numbness. In addition to being painful, neuropathy can be harmful because if it causes a loss of feeling in the foot, even a minor foot injury may go undiscovered. In extreme cases, this can lead to serious infection, gangrene, or even amputation of the limb. Because of this, people with diabetes must be meticulous in caring for their feet. Moderate exercise, such as walking, cycling, or swimming, are best for people with diabetes. Because people with diabetes have to take some extra precautions while exercising, you will need to work with your health-care provider to design an exercise program that is right for you. For example, since exercise lowers blood glucose, you will need to learn how to maintain the correc Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Diabetic foot ulcer is a major complication of diabetes mellitus, and probably the major component of the diabetic foot. Wound healing is an innate mechanism of action that works reliably most of the time. A key feature of wound healing is stepwise repair of lost extracellular matrix (ECM) that forms the largest component of the dermal skin layer.[1] But in some cases, certain disorders or physiological insult disturbs the wound healing process. Diabetes mellitus is one such metabolic disorder that impedes the normal steps of the wound healing process. Many studies show a prolonged inflammatory phase in diabetic wounds, which causes a delay in the formation of mature granulation tissue and a parallel reduction in wound tensile strength.[2] Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should include: blood sugar control, removal of dead tissue from the wound, wound dressings, and removing pressure from the wound through techniques such as total contact casting.[3] Surgery in some cases may improve outcomes.[3] Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may also help but is expensive.[3] It occurs in 15% of people with diabetes,[4] and precedes 84% of all diabetes-related lower-leg amputations.[5] Classification[edit] Diabetic foot ulcer is a complication of diabetes. Diabetic foot ulcers are classified as either neuropathic, neuroischaemic or ischaemic.[6] Risk factors[edit] Risk factors implicated in the development of diabetic foot ulcers are infection, older age,[7] diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, cigarette smoking, poor glycemic control, previous foot ulcerations or amputations,[5] and ischemia of small and large blood vessels.[8][9] Prior history of foot disease, foot deformities that produce abnormally high forces of pressure, renal failure, oedema, impaired ability to look Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Nearly 26 Million Americans Have Diabetes

Nearly 26 Million Americans Have Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes is increasing in both the United States and around the world. Diabetes currently affects nearly 26 million Americans. Because diabetes causes too much sugar (glucose) to stay in your bloodstream, it can damage many parts of the body, including the heart, blood vessels, nerves, eyes, and kidneys. What is a diabetic foot sore? Diabetes and high blood sugar can lead to foot problems in two ways: Nerve damage (also called neuropathy) can lead to loss of sensation in your feet and legs. Because of nerve damage, you may not feel cuts or sores, making it easy for them to become infected. Poor circulation in your feet and legs is caused by narrowing of blood vessels (also called peripheral artery disease or PAD). Because your vessels aren’t bringing enough blood with oxygen and nutrients, your body will be slow to fight off an infection and heal. A diabetic foot sore usually starts out on the bottom of the foot, and becomes deeper and sometimes even infected. The effects of diabetes can slow wound healing anywhere on the body, so small cuts and blisters can easily develop into deep sores. 1 of 4 Symptoms Because many people with diabetes who develop diabetic foot sores have lost the ability to feel pain, pain is not a common symptom. Even if pain is not felt, look out for the following symptoms: Drainage on your socks Redness Swelling Odor If you suspect a diabetic foot sore, contact your doctor immediately. Anyone who had diabetes can develop a diabetic foot sore. However, people who have diabetes plus the following risk factors are more likely to develop a diabetic foot sore: Older males People of Native American, African American, or Hispanic descent People who use insulin People with diabetes-related kidney, eye, or heart disease People Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetic Blisters?

What Causes Diabetic Blisters?

ANSWER People with diabetes can develop skin problems, including blisters that resemble burn blisters. These blisters can occur on the fingers, hands, toes, feet, legs, or forearms. Diabetic blisters usually are painless and heal on their own. These skin problems often occur in people who have severe diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. Bringing your blood sugar level under control is the medical treatment for this health condition. Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

If you have diabetes and experience the spontaneous eruption of blisters on your skin, they may well be diabetic blisters. These are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. Although the blisters may be alarming when you first spot them, they’re painless and normally heal on their own without leaving scars. A number of skin conditions are associated with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are fairly rare. An article in the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries notes that in the United States, the disorder occurs in only 0.5 percent of people with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are twice as likely to be found in men than in women. Diabetic blisters most often appear on your legs, feet, and toes. Less frequently, they show up on hands, fingers, and arms. Diabetic blisters can be as large as 6 inches, though they’re normally smaller. They’re often described as looking like blisters that occur when you get a burn, only without the pain. Diabetic blisters seldom appear as a single lesion. Rather, they are bilateral or occur in clusters. The skin surrounding the blisters isn’t normally red or swollen. If it is, see your doctor promptly. Diabetic blisters contain a clear, sterile fluid, and they’re usually itchy. Read about the eight best remedies for itching. Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes. The fluid in the blisters is sterile. To prevent infection, you shouldn’t puncture the blisters yourself, though if the lesion is large, your doctor may want to drain the fluid. This will keep the skin intact as a covering for Continue reading >>

Friction Blisters

Friction Blisters

What Is It? A friction blister is a soft pocket of raised skin filled with clear fluid caused by irritation from continuous rubbing or pressure. Friction blisters usually occur on the feet, where tight or poor-fitting shoes can rub and irritate delicate toes and heels for long periods of time. This type of irritation causes minor damage to the skin and the tissue just beneath the skin, then fluid accumulates just beneath the outermost layer of skin. If the irritation is enough to damage small blood vessels, the blister also may contain blood, and is then called a blood blister. Symptoms A friction blister is a small pocket of puffy, raised skin containing clear fluid. It is usually painful when touched. A blister can appear anywhere. Diagnosis Blisters can be diagnosed by looking at them. In short, if it looks like a blister and feels like a blister, and if it's in a place that could have been irritated by pressure or rubbing, it likely is a blister. Expected Duration Friction blisters typically drain on their own within days. A new layer of skin forms beneath the blister, and eventually the blistered skin peels away. If pressure or friction continues in the same area, the blister may last two weeks or longer. Continued friction may rub away the delicate top skin layer, and the blister may break open, ooze fluid and run the risk of becoming infected or developing into a deeper wound. If the irritation is mild, the blister may heal despite continued irritation, and eventually a callus will form. Prevention The best way to prevent friction blisters is to wear shoes that fit your feet well, so that the shoe is not tight anywhere and does not slide up and down your heel when you walk. Wear socks with shoes to protect your feet and prevent irritation, and try to keep your fe Continue reading >>

Foot Care

Foot Care

When you have diabetes you need to take care of your feet every day Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations Daily care can prevent serious complications Check your feet daily for changes or problems Visit a podiatrist annually for a check up or more frequently if your feet are at high risk Your feet are at risk because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves in your feet, blood circulation and infection. Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations. This damage is more likely if: You have had diabetes for a long time Your blood glucose levels have been too high for an extended period You smoke – smoking causes a reduced blood flow to your feet, wounds heal slowly You are inactive. It's important to check your feet every day. If you see any of the following- get medical treatment that *day * Ulcer Unusual swelling Redness Blisters Ingrown nail Bruising or cuts If you see any of the following- get medical treatment within 7 days Broken skin between toes Callus Corn Foot shape changes Cracked skin Nail colour changes Poor blood glucose control can cause nerve damage to feet. Symptoms include: Numbness Coldness of the legs A tingling, pins and needles sensation in the feet Burning pains in the legs and feet, usually more noticeable in bed at night. These symptoms can result in a loss of sensation in the feet which increases the risk of accidental damage because you can’t feel any pain. An injury to the feet can develop into an ulcer on the bottom of a foot which can penetrate to the bone. This could lead to infection of the bone (osteomyelitis) and a chronic infection in the bones and joints. If an infection isn’t treated at the earliest signs, this could result in ulceration (an infected open sore) and eventually Continue reading >>

Foot Care When You Have Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Foot Care When You Have Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

For people with diabetes, the smallest blister, bug bite or foot sore could lead to a difficult-to-heal foot infection, a skin ulcer and even the possibility of amputation. Risks are high – with diabetes, your lifetime risk for a foot ulcer is 25%.1 And between 9 and 20% of foot ulcers lead to amputations in the US..2 The causes: Nerve damage due to peripheral diabetic neuropathy that can rob you of protective skin sensations plus circulation problems and high blood sugar that can interfere with rapid healing. That is why diabetes experts recommend that everyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes protect their feet with daily foot checks, smart choices in socks and shoes, and comprehensive foot exams by a healthcare practitioner at least once a year. These strategies could save your feet: In one study of 352 people with diabetes from the Regenstrief Institute for Health Care in Indianapolis, those who learned and practiced good self-care for their feet for a year were 59% less likely to have a serious foot wound than those who didn’t .3 And they’re recommended for everyone with diabetes, not just people who already know they have nerve damage. The reason? Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can cause a dangerous loss of protective sensation before you realize it. In an Australian study of 32 people with diabetes, researchers found that just one in four could detect a foot injury like a small blister -- but 78% of study volunteers thought their feet were still sensitive to small problems.4 An Easy Plan To Help Protect Your Feet Do a Daily Foot Check. Sit down, take off your shoes and socks and check the top, bottom and all parts of the toes of both feet every day. Use a mirror or ask your spouse or partner to help if you have trouble seeing all areas of your feet. Check for Continue reading >>

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