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Diabetes Belt Usa

County-level

County-level "diabetes Belt" Carves A Swath Through U.s. South

More than 18 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with diabetes, which costs an estimated $174 billion annually. Typically, local public health agencies carry out the initiatives to manage and prevent this chronic disease, but because prevalence figures are generally given on national and state levels, local workers cannot gain the traction—and funding—to rein in rates in their areas. A new study drills down to the county level, revealing wide disparities within states and striking national patterns. "We're extremely excited about the county level," says Lawrence Barker, associate director for science at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Diabetes Translation. Many of the counties with the highest rates of diagnosed diabetes—higher than 11.2 percent of the population compared with the national average of 8.5 percent—are concentrated in 15 states and form an area the study's authors have labeled the "diabetes belt" (after the so-called "stroke belt" that described U.S. Southeast in the 1960s). "We've known for many years that there was a lot of diabetes in the Southeast," Barker says. But the new analysis, based on data from the self-reported national phone survey called the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), confirmed that the disease has a distinctive geographical distribution. The map and findings will be published in the April 2011 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The pattern of disease distribution is not a simple slice—nor does it follow the stroke belt. The diabetes belt touches states as far north as Ohio and Pennsylvania and as far west as Texas. But overall averages for many of these outlying states would not reveal the plights of their few high-prevalence counties. Sta Continue reading >>

Southern States Make Up Much Of Diabetes Belt

Southern States Make Up Much Of Diabetes Belt

Southern States Make Up Much of Diabetes Belt Study Shows High Rates of Type 2 Diabetes in the South March 7, 2011 -- The CDC says the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. are in a diabetes belt in 15 mostly Southern states. Researchers say the diabetes belt is similar to a stroke belt identified in earlier studies. The diabetes belt includes 644 counties in portions of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. Nearly a third of the difference in diabetes prevalence between the diabetes belt and the rest of the U.S. is associated with sedentary lifestyles and obesity . Identifying a diabetes belt by counties allows community leaders to identify regions most in need of efforts to prevent type 2 diabetes and to manage existing cases of the disease, says Lawrence E. Barker, PhD, in a news release. Barker is with the CDCs division of diabetes translation. Although many risk factors for type 2 diabetes cant be changed, others can, Barker says. Community design that promotes physical activity , along with improved access to healthy food, can encourage the healthy lifestyle changes that reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers identified four factors that distinguished the diabetes belt from the rest of the U.S.: The population of the diabetes belt counties contained substantially more non-Hispanic African-Americans than the rest of the country. In percentage terms, 23.8% of people in the diabetes belt were non-Hispanic African-Americans, compared to 8.6% for the rest of the country. 32.9% of people in the diabetes belt were classified as obese, compared to 26.1% in the rest of the country. 30.6% of people in the diabete Continue reading >>

Stroke Risk Factors Centered In Southeast United States

Stroke Risk Factors Centered In Southeast United States

Health The Southeastern United States features the highest concentrations of people living with stroke risk factors like high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, according to researchers who mapped the data. “Our findings show that the geographic distribution of stroke risk factors mirrors the geographic distribution of stroke mortality, which suggests that higher prevalence of risk factors in certain areas may be associated with higher risk of outcomes,” said Leslie McClure, PhD, a professor in Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health, who served as senior author on the study. “Trying to understand why is the next step in this analysis.” A former student of McClure’s, Mathew Loop, PhD, now an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, led the study, published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. Their team intended to map the prevalence of hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes and smoking — all considered major risk factors for stroke — across the United States. By using data collected from participants between 2003 and 2007 for the National Institutes of Health’s Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) population health study, the researchers hoped to get a good idea of the distribution of risk factors. Participants in the study were 45 years of age or older, and the data was sorted into white and black participants to determine if there were any racial disparities in the geographic distribution of the prevalence of certain risk factors. “Understanding the geographic distributions of risk factors is important to understanding where to focus clinical interventions and policy changes so that they can be most effective,” McClure explained. Data showed that the population of Continue reading >>

Stroke Belt - Wikipedia

Stroke Belt - Wikipedia

Stroke Belt or Stroke Alley is a name given to a region in the southeastern United States that has been recognized by public health authorities for having an unusually high incidence of stroke and other forms of cardiovascular disease . It is typically defined as a 9-state region consisting of Alabama , Arkansas , Georgia , Kentucky , Louisiana , Mississippi , North Carolina , South Carolina , and Tennessee . Although many possible causes for the high stroke incidence have been investigated, the reasons for the phenomenon have not been determined. Stroke death rates 2002-2007, adults 35+ by US county. The stroke belt is typically defined to include the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. [1] In 1980 these nine states had age-adjusted stroke mortality rates more than 10% above the national average. [2] Some investigators also consider North Florida to be a part of the stroke belt, based on a stroke mortality rate higher than several states included in the region. [3] East Texas also is characterized as a stroke belt. [4] High rates of lung cancer (indicated in this map by brown colors) are highly correlated with the Stroke Belt. The stroke belt was first identified in 1962 by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) researchers who noted a concentration of high stroke death rates in the Atlantic coastal plain counties of North Carolina , South Carolina and Georgia . [5] Similar high stroke rates were later observed in the Mississippi Delta region as well. [5] [6] Analysis by the CDC of U.S. mortality statistics from the period 1991 to 1998 found that for both blacks and whites the counties with the highest stroke death rates were in the southeastern states and the Mississippi Delta region. Strok Continue reading >>

Geographic Distribution Of Diagnosed Diabetes In The U.s.: A Diabetes Belt.

Geographic Distribution Of Diagnosed Diabetes In The U.s.: A Diabetes Belt.

1. Am J Prev Med. 2011 Apr;40(4):434-9. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.12.019. Geographic distribution of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S.: a diabetes belt. Barker LE(1), Kirtland KA, Gregg EW, Geiss LS, Thompson TJ. (1)CDC, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. [email protected] BACKGROUND: The American "stroke belt" has contributed to the study of stroke.However, U.S. geographic patterns of diabetes have not been as specificallycharacterized.PURPOSE: This study identifies a geographically coherent region of the U.S. wherethe prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is especially high, called the "diabetesbelt."METHODS: In 2010, data from the 2007 and 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor SurveillanceSystem were combined with county-level diagnosed diabetes prevalence estimates.Counties in close proximity with an estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes11.0% were considered to define the diabetes belt. Prevalence of risk factors inthe diabetes belt was compared to that in the rest of the U.S. The fraction ofthe excess risk associated with living in the diabetes belt associated withselected risk factors, both modifiable (sedentary lifestyle, obesity) andnonmodifiable (age, gender, race/ethnicity, education), was calculated.RESULTS: A diabetes belt consisting of 644 counties in 15 mostly southern states was identified. People in the diabetes belt were more likely to be non-HispanicAfrican-American, lead a sedentary lifestyle, and be obese than in the rest ofthe U.S. Thirty percent of the excess risk was associated with modifiable riskfactors, and 37% with nonmodifiable factors.CONCLUSIONS: Nearly one third of the difference in diabetes prevalence betweenthe diabetes belt and the rest of the U.S. is associated with sedentary lifestyleand obesity. Culturally appropriate interventions aimed at decreasing obe Continue reading >>

Changes In Disparity In County-level Diagnosed Diabetes Prevalence And Incidence In The United States, Between 2004 And 2012

Changes In Disparity In County-level Diagnosed Diabetes Prevalence And Incidence In The United States, Between 2004 And 2012

Abstract In recent decades, the United States experienced increasing prevalence and incidence of diabetes, accompanied by large disparities in county-level diabetes prevalence and incidence. However, whether these disparities are widening, narrowing, or staying the same has not been studied. We examined changes in disparity among U.S. counties in diagnosed diabetes prevalence and incidence between 2004 and 2012. We used 2004 and 2012 county-level diabetes (type 1 and type 2) prevalence and incidence data, along with demographic, socio-economic, and risk factor data from various sources. To determine whether disparities widened or narrowed over the time period, we used a regression-based β-convergence approach, accounting for spatial autocorrelation. We calculated diabetes prevalence/incidence percentage point (ppt) changes between 2004 and 2012 and modeled these changes as a function of baseline diabetes prevalence/incidence in 2004. Covariates included county-level demographic and, socio-economic data, and known type 2 diabetes risk factors (obesity and leisure-time physical inactivity). For each county-level ppt increase in diabetes prevalence in 2004 there was an annual average increase of 0.02 ppt (p<0.001) in diabetes prevalence between 2004 and 2012, indicating a widening of disparities. However, after accounting for covariates, diabetes prevalence decreased by an annual average of 0.04 ppt (p<0.001). In contrast, changes in diabetes incidence decreased by an average of 0.04 ppt (unadjusted) and 0.09 ppt (adjusted) for each ppt increase in diabetes incidence in 2004, indicating a narrowing of county-level disparities. County-level disparities in diagnosed diabetes prevalence in the United States widened between 2004 and 2012, while disparities in incidence narrow Continue reading >>

‘diabetes Belt’ Encircles Southern U.s.

‘diabetes Belt’ Encircles Southern U.s.

Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control estimate, and that number could expand to one-third of the U.S. population by 2050 if obesity and other trends continue. The NewsHour has been covering this story, reporting on efforts to improve diabetes treatment among low-income and uninsured patients and fight childhood obesity in Mississippi. This week, a new study highlights the importance of that effort in Mississippi and other southern states. A claw-shaped “diabetes belt” stretches across the southeastern United States and up through Appalachia, according to a Centers for Disease Control study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. More than 11 percent of people in those areas have diabetes, compared to 8.5 percent of people outside the diabetes belt. The new analysis will allow public health officials to better target diabetes interventions and outreach to areas with the greatest need, said Lawrence Barker, the lead author of the report and associate director for science in the division of diabetes translation at the CDC. Researchers from the CDC used county-by-county estimates of diabetes prevalence to define the belt, which covers parts of fifteen states — Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia — as well as all of Mississippi. In many ways, the finding is not a surprise. “We’ve known for many years that there was more diabetes in the southeastern U.S., but it was a very general statement,” Barker said. “This allows us to have a much more specific idea of where we find a greater prevalence.” The researchers found that people across the diabetes bel Continue reading >>

Diabetes Belt = Fast Food Belt?

Diabetes Belt = Fast Food Belt?

Youre probably familiar with the Bible Belt , that swath of our nation characterized, for example, by the preponderance of Christian groups, such as Baptists: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has just released a high resolution map {see above} , Percentage of Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes, revealing a Diabetes Belt. An article in Scientific American {March 8, 2011) points out: More than 18 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with diabetes, which costs an estimated $174 billion annually. Typically, local public health agencies carry out the initiatives to manage and prevent this chronic disease, but because prevalence figures are generally given on national and state levels, local workers cannot gain the tractionand fundingto rein in rates in their areas. A new study drills down to the county level, revealing wide disparities within states and striking national patterns. The 15 states that have counties in the diabetes belt are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia. Belt counties, however, are unevenly distributed among those states on the list, ranging from a few in Ohio and Texas to the majority of Alabamas countiesand every one in Mississippi. This pattern made me wonder whether there might be a correlation of incidence of diabetes and fast food restaurants, given the clear link between type 2 diabetes and obesity. Keep in mind, my musings are not a scientific study. Im simply asking the question. Heres what I found from Google maps ( Fastfoodmaps.com , showing 49,750 restaurants). Continue reading >>

15 Us States Make Up Newly Identified 'diabetes Belt'

15 Us States Make Up Newly Identified 'diabetes Belt'

15 US States Make Up Newly Identified 'Diabetes Belt' Health experts have identified a "diabetes belt" that includes 644 counties in 15 states across the southern and southeastern United States, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Nearly 12 percent of people who live in this region have diabetes , compared with 8.5 percent of people in the rest of the United States, the study said. The diabetes belt area also includes more people who are obese (32.9 percent) than in the rest of the country (26.1 percent), and more people who don't exercise regularly (30.6 percent) than in the rest of the country (24.8 percent), the study said. The main reasons for the prevalence of diabetes in this region are likely dietary habits, lack of physical activity and income level, said study researcher Lawrence E. Barker, of the CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation. "Variations in preference of diet, based on culture, may be a contributor," Barker told MyHealthNewsDaily. The diabetes belt includes counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia. The entire state of Mississippi is also contained within the belt, the study said. The study was published March 7 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Barker and his colleagues analyzed 2007 and 2008 data from the CDC's national Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which included information on health conditions and risk behaviors, and combined that information with county-level diabetes data. Counties with a diabetes prevalence of 11 percent or more were designated as part of the belt, the study said. Researchers calculated that 30 percent of the heightened risk of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Belt Identified In Southern Us

Diabetes Belt Identified In Southern Us

Diabetes belt identified in southern US Researchers have identified a diabetes belt, a cluster of 644 counties in 15 mostly southeastern states that have a prevalence of diabetes of 11% or more. The belt includes portions of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and the entire state of Mississippi. Using data from the 2007 and 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and county-level diagnosed diabetes prevalence estimates, researchers found that the prevalence of diabetes in the diabetes belt was 11.7% vs. 8.5% in the rest of the country. Nearly one-third of the difference in diabetes prevalence between the diabetes belt and the rest of the United States is associated with sedentary lifestyle and obesity, researchers wrote in the When researchers compared demographics and risk factors such as age, sex, sedentary lifestyle, race/ethnicity, education and obesity, four factors distinguished the diabetes belt from the rest of the United States: Diabetes belt counties contained substantially more non-Hispanic blacks (23.8% vs. 8.6%). Obesity was greater in the diabetes belt (32.9% vs. 26.1%). Sedentary lifestyle was more common (30.6% vs. 24.8%). The proportion of people with a college degree was smaller in the diabetes belt (24.1% vs. 34.3%). Additionally, 30% of the excess diabetes risk in the diabetes belt was associated with modifiable risk factors, whereas 37% was associated with nonmodifiable factors such as age and race/ethnicity. Tailored interventions that target obese, sedentary, non-Hispanic black people should be considered in appropriate locations within the diabetes belt, the researchers said. Identifying a diabetes belt by counties allows Continue reading >>

Where In The Country Is Diabetes Belt And Why?

Where In The Country Is Diabetes Belt And Why?

Where in the Country is Diabetes Belt and Why? Posted by ADW Diabetes | Jan 13, 2015 | Diabetes Management | 0 | The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found a certain area of the United States has the highest rates of type 2 diabetes. These 15 states are referred to as the diabetes belt. Discover where the diabetes belt is and why. The CDC determined the highest rates of diabetes in the United States are in a diabetes belt. The diabetes belt is similar to the stroke belt found in earlier studies. The diabetes belt is in 15 mostly Southern states. The diabetes belt includes 644 counties in parts of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia. About 12 percent of the people in these areas have type 2 diabetes compared with 8.5 percent in the rest of the nation. About a third of the difference in diabetes prevalence between these areas and the rest of the United States is associated with obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The CDC identified regions that most need efforts to prevent diabetes type 2 and help people who have it manage the disease. Communities are encouraged to promote physical activity and access to healthy food to help people initiate positive lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Four factors distinguish the diabetes belt from the rest of the country. Over 32 percent of the people in the diabetes belt were obese, compared to about 26 percent in the rest of the U.S. The diabetes belt counties have more African-Americans than the rest of the nation. Just less than 25 percent of the people in the diabetes belt have a college degree while about 34 percent have a college degree in the rest of the country. P Continue reading >>

Diabetes Belt Identified In Southern United States

Diabetes Belt Identified In Southern United States

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Diabetes belt identified in southern United States Researchers were able to identify clustered high prevalence areas, or a "diabetes belt" of 644 counties in 15 mostly southeastern states, using data compiled for the first time of estimates of the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes for every US county. In the 1960s, a group of U.S. states with high age-adjusted stroke mortality defined a "stroke belt." Until recently, geographic patterns of diabetes had not been specifically characterized in the same manner. In an article published in the April 2011 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers were able to identify clustered high prevalence areas, or a "diabetes belt" of 644 counties in 15 mostly southeastern states using data compiled for the first time of estimates of the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes for every U.S. county. "Identifying a diabetes belt by counties allows community leaders to identify regions most in need of efforts to prevent type 2 diabetes and to manage existing cases of the disease," commented lead investigator Lawrence E. Barker, PhD, Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA. "Although many risk factors for type 2 diabetes can't be changed, others can. Community design that promotes physical activity, along with improved access to healthy food, can encourage the healthy lifestyle changes that reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes." Nearly one third of the difference in diabetes prevalence between the diabetes belt and the rest of the U.S. is associated with sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Thirty percent of the excess Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fellowship | Division Of Endocrinology | Department Of Internal Medicine | East Carolina University

Diabetes Fellowship | Division Of Endocrinology | Department Of Internal Medicine | East Carolina University

Diabetes is currently reaching epidemic proportions in the United States with over 29 million persons affected in this country. The total costs of healthcare for people with diabetes in the U.S. exceeded $322 billion in 2012. Eastern North Carolina is one of the areas in the diabetes belt that is defined by having counties with over an 11% prevalence of diabetes. The incidence is higher in Eastern North Carolina given the high percentage of minorities, the high prevalence of obesity, and substandard health care in much of our rural area. This is certainly bad news for the health of our area but a great opportunity for learners. The good news is that thanks to medical research, we are undergoing an unprecedented explosion in the development of new treatments for patients with diabetes. What is ironic and most unfortunate is that at this very time we are facing a serious shortage of diabetes specialists in the U.S. and in areas Eastern N.C. in particular. Most diabetologists are endocrinologists, i.e., physicians who have been formally trained in internal medicine or pediatrics and have completed an additional two or three year fellowship in either adult or pediatric endocrinology to develop an expertise in diabetes. There is a huge shortage of endocrinologists in the US. Furthermore, many endocrinologists are not passionate about or even interested in caring for people with diabetes. Unfortunately, true diabetes specialists may be considered an endangered species with the dwindling ranks of endocrinologists who dedicate themselves to care of the patients with diabetes. Given this situation, it is not surprising that primary care physicians manage over 90% of patients with diabetes. However, modern management of diabetes requires extensive training, including education o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Belt Identified In Southern United States

Diabetes Belt Identified In Southern United States

Diabetes Belt Identified in Southern United States Diabetes Belt Identified in Southern United States According to new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine San Diego, CA, March 8, 2011 In the 1960s, a group of U.S. states with high age-adjusted stroke mortality defined a "stroke belt." Until recently, geographic patterns of diabetes had not been specifically characterized in the same manner. In an article published in the April 2011 issue of theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers were able to identify clustered high prevalence areas, or a "diabetes belt" of 644 counties in 15 mostly southeastern states using data compiled for the first time of estimates of the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes for every U.S. county. Identifying a diabetes belt by counties allows community leaders to identify regions most in need of efforts to prevent type 2 diabetes and to manage existing cases of the disease, commented lead investigator Lawrence E. Barker, PhD, Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA. Although many risk factors for type 2 diabetes cant be changed, others can. Community design that promotes physical activity, along with improved access to healthy food, can encourage the healthy lifestyle changes that reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Nearly one third of the difference in diabetes prevalence between the diabetes belt and the rest of the U.S. is associated with sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Thirty percent of the excess risk was associated with modifable risk factors, and 37% with nonmodifable factors, such as age and race/ethnicity. Data from the diabetes belt showed prevalence rates greater than 11.0 Continue reading >>

Changes In Diagnosed Diabetes, Obesity, And Physical Inactivity Prevalence In Us Counties, 2004-2012

Changes In Diagnosed Diabetes, Obesity, And Physical Inactivity Prevalence In Us Counties, 2004-2012

Abstract Recent studies suggest that prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States reached a plateau or slowed around 2008, and that this change coincided with obesity plateaus and increases in physical activity. However, national estimates can obscure important variations in geographic subgroups. We examine whether a slowing or leveling off in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure time physical inactivity prevalence is also evident across the 3143 counties of the United States. We used publicly available county estimates of the age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity, which were generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using a Bayesian multilevel regression that included random effects by county and year and applied cubic splines to smooth these estimates over time, we estimated the average annual percentage point change (APPC) from 2004 to 2008 and from 2008 to 2012 for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in each county. Compared to 2004–2008, the median APPCs for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity were lower in 2008–2012 (diabetes APPC difference = 0.16, 95%CI 0.14, 0.18; obesity APPC difference = 0.65, 95%CI 0.59, 0.70; physical inactivity APPC difference = 0.43, 95%CI 0.37, 0.48). APPCs and APPC differences between time periods varied among counties and U.S. regions. Despite improvements, levels of these risk factors remained high with most counties merely slowing rather than reversing, which suggests that all counties would likely benefit from reductions in these risk factors. The diversity of trajectories in the prevalence of these risk factors across counties underscores the continued need to identify high risk areas and populations for prevent Continue reading >>

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