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Diabetes Belly

Belly Fat Causes Diabetes, Heart Attacks

Belly Fat Causes Diabetes, Heart Attacks

Abdominal obesity comes from high blood insulin levels. To prevent blood sugar levels from rising too high after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin, which converts blood sugar to a type of fat called triglyceride. Insulin drives triglycerides into the fat cells in your belly. So having high triglycerides and a fat belly are signs of high blood insulin levels, and high blood levels of insulin constrict arteries to cause heart attacks. Insulin also acts on the brain to make you eat more and on your liver to manufacture more fat, and on the fat cells in your belly to store that fat. The liver removes insulin from the bloodstream, but insulin causes fat to be deposited in the liver which prevents the liver from removing insulin from the bloodstream. People with fat bellies store too much fat in their livers, which prevents the livers from removing insulin, so insulin levels rise higher and higher to cause heart attacks, more abdominal obesity and eventually diabetes. If you store fat primarily in your belly, you should restrict refined carbohydrates: foods made with flour, white rice, milled corn or added sugars. See Treatment of Insulin Resistance Fat cells in your belly are different from those on your hips. The blood that flows from belly fat goes directly to your liver, whereas the blood that flows from your hips goes into your general circulation. The livers of those who store fat in their bellies are blocked from removing insulin by the extra fat and therefore do not remove insulin from the bloodstream as effectively as the livers of people who store fat primarily in their hips. People who store fat primarily in their bellies have higher blood insulin and sugar levels, which raise levels of the bad LDL cholesterol that causes heart attacks, and lower levels of th Continue reading >>

Lose Belly Fat Fast With This Diabetes-friendly Exercise Routine

Lose Belly Fat Fast With This Diabetes-friendly Exercise Routine

Everyone seems to want a slimmer middle, a smaller pant size — you know the drill. But trimming your waistline is about so much more than how you look in the mirror; it’s about improving your insulin sensitivity, glucose levels, and risk for diabetes complications, such as heart attacks, strokes, and cancer. “Current research shows that abdominal fat is a driving factor behind the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, as well as [a factor that affects] how people manage the condition,” explains Margaret Eckert-Norton, PhD, RN, a certified diabetes educator and associate professor of nursing at St. Joseph’s College in New York City. The Difference Between Visceral Fat and Subcutaneous Fat Belly fat, also known as abdominal or visceral fat, hangs out in and around your internal organs. It's known to secrete a variety of proteins that trigger inflammation and affect your body’s hormone levels, and it can increase your risk for a variety of conditions (but more on this later). For this reason, some experts actually call it “active fat.” That’s in contrast to subcutaneous fat, which sits directly underneath your skin and pretty much just acts as an energy reserve without strongly influencing health, Dr. Eckert-Norton says. How Excess Belly Fat Can Increase the Risk of Diabetes Complications So what are those conditions that belly fat influences? The first and most notable one for anyone with diabetes is insulin resistance, she says. One of the many factors at play is retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), a compound that visceral cells secrete, dulling the body’s sensitivity to the hormone insulin, encouraging the development and progression of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Those complications range from peripheral and central diabeti Continue reading >>

Fat Around The Belly & Diabetes

Fat Around The Belly & Diabetes

If you’ve recently moved up a waist size in your pants, you might take pause and evaluate your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Though a multitude of factors such as genetic predisposition and environmental triggers can influence development of type 2 diabetes, carrying excess body weight has long been associated with increased risk. In 2007, the Association for Weight Management and Obesity Prevention, The Obesity Society, and the American Diabetes Association released a consensus statement identifying waist circumference as a “stronger predictor of diabetes” than BMI. (See Reference 2) Type 2 diabetes can be defined as the reduced production of insulin coupled with cell resistance to that insulin. (See Reference 3) Produced by the pancreas, insulin enables cells to take in their energy source from the blood: sugar. Because fat tissue secretes substances that reduce cells’ sensitivity to insulin, the more fat tissue present in the body, the more insulin resistance. Fat tissue concentrated in the abdomen is especially associated with insulin resistance. (See Reference 3) Waist Circumference is More Predictive Than BMI In preparation for their 2007 consensus statement, the Association for Weight Management and Obesity Prevention, The Obesity Society, and the American Diabetes Association extensively reviewed obesity-related clinical research studies as well as large epidemiological studies. Review of the data revealed that waist circumference, not BMI, was a consistently better predictor of whether a person would develop type 2 diabetes or not. (See Reference 2) Evidence from these studies also supports that waist circumference is a better predictor than blood pressure or even blood sugar levels. (See Reference 2) Weight Loss Can Reduce Your Risk The Diabetes Continue reading >>

The Exercise Solution For Blood Sugar, Belly Fat, And Pre-diabetes

The Exercise Solution For Blood Sugar, Belly Fat, And Pre-diabetes

0 You don’t have to eat like this to be challenged with blood sugar issues. Whether or not you have diabetes, have been told you are pre-diabetic, or simply want solutions to losing belly fat, you’ll want to read this article. In fact, in the environment many of us grew up in (marshmallow stars, anyone?), we easily are or were pre-diabetic. If you are weight loss resistant or you’re having trouble with belly fat you’ve never had issues with before you can’t blame it all on your sex or stress hormones. Insulin is the hormone that teams up with others to be the real belly fat bully. I want to share with you the resistance training advantage in beating belly fat and or diabetes. Even if you’re on insulin, the chance to reduce your meds and to feel better with resistance training is only good routine away. (see specifics below – not just any old routine will do) It’s no secret that if you’re diabetic you should exercise. It can be tricky to begin if this is your first wake up call to exercise. The combination of meal timing, insulin, and exercise all need to be taken into consideration. Glucometers that make it simple to take immediate readings help. Even if you’ve never been told you’re pre-diabetic if you have any of the signs and symptoms below you might be. Invest in a $20 glucometer from your pharmacy and get clear on where you stand. Low and high blood sugar both are a problem you want to fix with diet and exercise. Hungry within 1-2 hours after a meal (you should be easily able to go 3-4 hours) Feeling sick if you miss a meal (hunger yes, but sickness, no) Moody, depressed, anxious Crashing several hours after a meal, commonly in the afternoon Constant cravings and need to snack Exercise For Blood Sugar Stabilization Aerobic exercise has always Continue reading >>

Banishing Belly Fat

Banishing Belly Fat

Amy Campbell, CDE, is a registered dietitian and the author of several books about diabetes, including 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet and Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition and Meal Planning. With winter winding down and swimsuit season right around the corner, our thoughts often turn to the few pounds that we may have put on since the holidays. And if you’re like many people, those few pounds may be clinging to your middle just like, well, a spare tire. Even if you’re not overweight or looking to lose weight, you may have noticed (especially if you’re a menopausal woman) that your weight has shifted and that your midsection is thicker than it used to be. Self, meet belly fat. What is belly fat? And why does it matter? Belly fat is just what the name implies. It’s fat that piles on around your waist and in your abdominal section. The good news, if you want to view it as such, is that everyone has some belly fat—even supermodels and physically fit people. However, unlike fat in other areas of your body, such as your arms, thighs, or under your chin, belly fat is deeper and more serious in terms of its health implications. Another term for belly fat is visceral fat. Visceral fat is not your run-of-the-mill type of fat. Rather, it’s a vicious type of fat that wraps itself around the internal organs. Subcutaneous fat, on other hand, is a layer of fat that lies just beneath the skin. It’s annoying for sure, but it’s pretty harmless compared to visceral fat. Unlike fat in other areas of your body, belly fat is more serious in terms of its health implications. Keep in mind that belly fat is generally a combination of both subcutaneous and visceral fat. While there’s no easy way to know how much of each you have (short of having a CT scan or an MRI), grab a Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Permanently Banish Belly Fat

7 Ways To Permanently Banish Belly Fat

Sixty-nine percent of American adults are overweight, and over 35 percent are obese1. These conditions aren’t just aesthetically unpleasing. Obesity increases your risk for numerous conditions including heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer2. Sadly, about 3.4 million adults die each year3 from being overweight or obese. Globally, obesity now kills about the same as tobacco and more than all wars, terrorism, and violence. Nearly all people who are overweight already have “pre-diabetes” and have significant risks of disease and death. They just don’t know it. When you begin to put on weight, especially lethal belly fat, your biology shifts out of balance, veering into the unstable and unhealthy territory of disease —which in turn makes you fatter. A vicious, deadly cycle ensues unless you take control of your weight. Insulin: The Key Player in Belly Fat Numerous hormones contribute to belly fat, but none proves more powerful than insulin, your fat storage hormone. High levels of insulin tell your body to gain weight around the belly, and you become more apple-shaped over time. Insulin also drives inflammation and oxidative stress, creating myriad downstream effects. Eventually you become insulin resistant, which leads your body to generate belly fat and hold on to that spare tire for dear life. Fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, blood sugar swings or hypoglycemia, high triglycerides, low HDL, low sex drive, and problems with blood clotting are also common among people who are overweight. Simply put, less insulin equals less belly fat, since insulin makes you hungry and stores belly fat. The best thing you can do to prevent diabesity and all its problems is to lose weight. The Number One Thing You Can Do to Reduce Belly Fat Hig Continue reading >>

Why Getting Rid Of Belly Fat May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Why Getting Rid Of Belly Fat May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Belly fat can hamper blood-sugar-regulating organs.IstockphotoExcess weight is probably the number one risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Yes, other factors, such as genes and aging do play a role in type 2 diabetes. But an International Obesity Task Force estimated in 2002 that 60% of diabetes cases around the world were due to weight gain, and in Western nations it was closer to 90%. If you are obese or overweight, you are 90 times as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as someone who is not, according to a review of medical literature published in 2003 by University of Kentucky and other researchers. Why belly fat is so bad And while any excess fat cranks up the risk of diabetes, fat in your midsectionwhich tends to swaddle organs that play a key role in regulating blood sugaris a bigger contributor to risk. "When those fat cells go in and around your belly, not down in your buttocks or your hips, but when it's around the belly … that fat in and of itself works to block the action of insulin, which is necessary to lower the blood sugar," says Gerald Bernstein, MD, director of the diabetes management program at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. More about type 2 diabetes Insulin normally triggers the liver to take up extra blood glucose and store the energy for future use. But when the liver is submerged in fat tissue, insulin "can't get the liver to respond," he says. As a result, blood sugar can accumulate in the bloodstream, where it can damage organs all over your body. But even a relatively moderate amount of weight loss and exercise can protect you from diabetes. Next Page: How exercise helps [ pagebreak ]How exercise helps, even if you don't lose weight Regular exercise makes cells more sensitive to insulin, Continue reading >>

The Role Of Belly Fat In Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Role Of Belly Fat In Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

In a recent study, scientists found that there is a link between belly fat and type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers set out to find if genetic evidence is consistent with a casual relationship with belly fat and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease that other studies have found. They conducted a study where they tested the association of a polygenic risk score for wast-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index which is a measure of belly fat, with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease through blood cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and glycemic phenotypes. Study Details Data was taken from 4 genome-wide association studies conducted between 2007 and 2015 involving 322,154 participants and other data from the UK Biobank collected between 2007-2011 involving another 111,986 participants. Then, estimates for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease were taken from summary statistics of two other genome0wide association studies which took place between 2007 and 2015 and involving 149,821 individuals and another 184,305 individuals “combined with individual-level data from the UK Biobank”. The researchers found that a genetic predisposition to a higher waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for body mass index) was linked to more risk for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. The study authors concluded in their study abstract that “These results provide evidence supportive of a causal association between abdominal adiposity and these outcomes.” How to Measure Your Waist Waist measurements or waist-to-hip ratio are both good ways to determine future health risks. The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health states that according to the American Heart Association, waist circumference should be no larger than 35 inches (88 centimeters) for women a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Belly Fat Gene Increases Risk

Diabetes: Belly Fat Gene Increases Risk

Excess weight is a known risk factor for diabetes. However, the latest study finds that where and how that fat is stored is just as important. The researchers identify and investigate a pivotal fat-controlling gene. A new study digs into the genetics of fat cells and their relationship with diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes . That's almost 1 in 10 people. This is no small issue and, as such, a great deal of research effort is spent trying to understand who is most likely to develop the condition, as well as why. Certain risk factors for type 2 diabetes are already known. For instance, being 45 or older and having high blood pressure , depression , heart disease , or a family history of diabetes are all likely to raise a person's risk. Arguably, the most well-known risk factor is being overweight or obese. But a new study shows that, although body fat certainly is a risk factor, the story is a little more convoluted. The research was completed by scientists from the University of Oxford, MRC Harwell, King's College London all of which are in the United Kingdom the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, among others. Of particular interest to the team was a gene called KLF14. Although this gene has little impact on a person's weight, it modifies the way in which fat is stored. They discovered that in women, a certain variation of KLF14 causes fat to be deposited on the hips rather than the abdomen. Also, although there are fewer fat cells in total, each one is much larger and chocked full of fat. The theory is that, because there are fewer fat cells overall, each needs to take on a higher volume of fat and, conseque Continue reading >>

Belly Fat Gene Increases Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

Belly Fat Gene Increases Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

Belly fat gene increases type 2 diabetes risk, study suggests Belly fat gene increases type 2 diabetes risk, study suggests Concerns over cultural barriers in type 2 diabetes education for South Asia community 05 April 2018 A specific type of belly fat gene could have a significant impact on whether someone develops type 2 diabetes , researchers have said. Being overweight and having excess belly fat is known to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, but losing weight through eating a healthy diet and making positive lifestyle changes can reduce the risk. This new research from the University of Oxford reveals that one gene in particular, KLF14, can be a factor in the increased risk of type 2 diabetes related to belly fat . KLF14 was shown to modify how fat is stored, and in women a slightly different version of the gene meant the fat tended to be deposited on the hips rather than the abdomen , which conveys a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Fewer overall fat cells were observed, but the fat cells were larger and contained a greater mass of fat. The researchers demonstrated that these cells increased the risk of type 2 diabetes and showed that not all body fat is equal with excess fat stored in some parts of the body playing a more significant role. Co-lead author Professor Mark McCarthy, from the University of Oxford, stated: "Here, we identify a key gene involved in women in determining whether excess fat is stored around the hips (where it tends to be free of metabolic consequences) or around the waist (where it is particularly likely to increase diabetes risk). "Being overweight is known to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, but this study shows that not all fat is equal: where any excess fat is stored in the body has a big impact on disease risk." The researchers Continue reading >>

What Is

What Is "diabetic Stomach"?

My niece takes an oral medicine for diabetes. At least once a week, she throws up at night. The doctor calls it "diabetic stomach." I have never heard of this, and I have had diabetes for 36 years. What could be the cause of her stomach problems, and what foods may be causing flare-ups? Continue reading >>

Dr. Oz: Diabetes Fight Starts With Belly Fat

Dr. Oz: Diabetes Fight Starts With Belly Fat

Almost everyone knows someone who has diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, an estimated 23.6 million people in the United States -- or 7.8 percent of the population -- have diabetes, a serious, lifelong condition. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Diabetes is also associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body. The disease often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Diabetes is also on the rise in kids, as a result of obesity. Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of Fox Network's "The Dr. Oz Show," is passionate about this public health crisis. He appeared on "The Early Show" Wednesday from Washington, D.C., where he is the keynote speaker at the National Conference on Diabetes. Dr. Oz said he estimates that 57 million more people than the American Diabetes Association statistics include are likely to have diabetes or be pre-diabetic. Oz said, "The irony is the earlier you intervene and help folks, the better they'll do. It'll double the survival rates, but 90 percent of people don't realize it." So how do you know if you have diabetes? Oz said thirst, excess urination and weakness are factors, but another big factor is belly fat. "Your belly fat is what tells us if you're at high risk for being a Type II diabetic." Oz gave a formula for learning if you're at risk: You take your height in inches and divide that in half. If your waist size is more than half your height, you're at higher risk for developing complications from belly fat. He said the leading complication is diabetes. Oz said the formula works for men, women and children. Oz also suggested these practical ways to combat diabetes: • Include fiber with Breakfast - "Everyone knows bre Continue reading >>

How To Lose Stomach Fat Resulting From Diabetes

How To Lose Stomach Fat Resulting From Diabetes

Excess stomach fat, also known as abdominal or central obesity, is linked to impaired insulin action or insulin resistance. Consequently, abdominal obesity is associated with a higher risk for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Weight loss, particularly loss of stomach fat, can help manage diabetes and reduce the risk of pre-diabetes and T2DM. However, loss of body fat occurs all over when you lose weight, so it cannot be targeted to the abdominal area only. Methods to lose weight are focused on a nutritious, reduced-calorie diet with an increased level of physical activity. Overall Weight Loss Effects on Stomach Fat Body fat is categorized as either subcutaneous fat, found under the skin, or visceral fat that surrounds internal organs, including those in the abdominal cavity. While either type of fat can be found in the abdomen, visceral fat is linked to a greater risk of health problems such as prediabetes and T2DM. An article published in the January 2008 "International Journal of Obesity" reviewed results from 61 studies examining visceral and subcutaneous fat loss after weight loss interventions. Researchers found modest weight loss resulted in a preferential loss of abdominal fat, but this benefit is less or even negated in weight loss greater than 20 percent. Diet and Loss of Stomach Fat According to 2014 statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 9 percent of the U.S. population suffers from diabetes, and 85 percent of people with diabetes are overweight. Loss of abdominal fat in T2DM, as part of overall weight loss, helps control T2DM by improving insulin action. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a variety of eating patterns, as part of a reduced-calorie meal plan, can be used to lose weight. These patter Continue reading >>

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

As frustrating as it is to carry around that spare tire or suffer from “muffin top” syndrome, you might find some comfort in the fact that a slimmer, trimmer middle is something that everyone strives for, even celebrities (OK, I realize that’s little consolation). But my point is that, whether your goal is to lose weight to improve your health, to look better, or to feel better — or all three — it can be a challenge. Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to whittle your waist somewhat and, perhaps most importantly, lower your risk for a host of health problems. Blasting Away Belly Fat: Here’s How Losing weight can be a challenge, and it seems to be harder for some than others. Plus, depending on how much you want to lose, you may be in it for the long haul. Keep in mind that everyone is different, and what may work for one person may not be the best option for someone else. There really is no magic bullet…yet. And if there were, all of us would have heard of it by now. That being said, last week I mentioned that liposuction (not exactly a feasible option for many people due to the cost) is not a contender for losing visceral fat. So what does work? Here are some possible options: Move it. Yes, you do need to exercise. There’s no way around it. For some people, exercise doesn’t result in actual weight loss (meaning, the scale may not budge), but it can and does shrink visceral fat. Even if you haven’t gained weight, you may notice that fat redistributes itself and tends to settle around your middle. This is especially true of women who have gone through menopause. A study done at Duke University showed that men and women who did no exercise for six months increased their visceral fat by 9%; those who exercised regularly decreased their viscer Continue reading >>

Belly Fat Clearest Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Belly Fat Clearest Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Men who measure more than 102cm (40 inches) around the middle – and not below the belly – are five times more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than men with a smaller waist, while women who measure more than 88cm (35 inches) are three times more likely to be diagnosed than others, according to advice from Public Health England. People who are simply overweight, as well as those who are obese, are risking type 2 diabetes, which can lead to blindness, amputations and an early death, the public health body has warned. Abdominal fat – around the stomach – is a better indicator of your chances of getting it than BMI (body mass index), which is a ratio of weight to height. "Diabetes is a massive problem. It is getting clearer and clearer that it is a massive problem in England and the single best thing you can do to address it is to lose weight," said Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England. In an advisory report to local authorities, who now have responsibility for public health including combating obesity, Public Health England is stating categorically for the first time that excess weight is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Some 90% of people with the disease are overweight. Treating people with the disease and its complications - they also risk cardiovascular disease, kidney disease and depression – cost £8.8bn in 2010-11, which is approaching 10% of the NHS budget. Around 23,300 people died prematurely that year because of it. It is not just about those who are morbidly obese, said Tedstone. "Over 60% of us are at risk of type 2 diabetes because we are overweight," she said. "But overweight has become normalised and many people no longer realise they are potentially endangering their health. "People underestimate the Continue reading >>

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