diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Bedtime Snack Ideas

Rethinking Bedtime Snacks For Type 2 Diabetics

Rethinking Bedtime Snacks For Type 2 Diabetics

I had an obese Type 2 diabetic patient at one of my jails recently who wrote a long grievance about not receiving a bedtime snack. He argued in the grievance that he had received a bedtime snack at previous facilities where he was incarcerated (which was true) and a bedtime snack was “the standard of care” for Type 2 diabetics. I thought that this argument was ridiculous, especially since this patient routinely purchases lots of candy bars and Ramen Noodles from the commissary (think 30-40 candy bars a week). However, despite the fact that bedtime snacks are routine at many correctional facilities, I believe that bedtime snacks for Type 2 diabetics in a correctional setting is, in most instances, a bad idea and bad medical care. I would like to discuss why this is so by discussing what our overall goals for Type 2 diabetic management are, where the whole idea of diabetic snacks came from in the first place, and then present three cases. What Are Our Dietary Goals for Type 2 Diabetics? Let’s begin by agreeing on our overall treatment goals for Type 2 diabetics. Type 2 diabetics have a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism. We call this “Insulin Resistance.” However, this does not mean that the insulin that the patient produces is damaged or malfunctioning; it means (simplistically stated) that the insulin is being overwhelmed by the amount of work it has to do. So the first principle of Type 2 diabetes management is to decrease consumption of carbohydrates, especially quickly absorbed “white” carbohydrates like sugar and processed flour. When we order a “Diabetic Diet” in a correctional setting, that is what we are getting: Fewer carbs, especially sugar and other quickly absorbed carbs. This decreases the pressure on the pancreas to make ever more insulin Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

Nighttime Snack- A Blood Sugar Must

Nighttime Snack- A Blood Sugar Must

Over and over again, I have heard people say “Don’t eat after 8pm, its bad for your health” with no evidence to back up this supposed claim. Your body will not magically turn all calories into fat if you eat a piece of fruit, a cracker or even your dinner the second the clock strikes 8pm, but for those with type 2 diabetes, not eating a nighttime snack may actually be contributing to high blood sugars in the morning. Medications for diabetes-especially insulin – work by helping glucose enter the cells and lowering blood sugar values. This medication is adjusted specifically for each individual in order to make sure that blood sugars don’t stay too high or drop too low. However, insulin may act in your body for an extended period of time, depending on the type. During the day, we are constantly providing our body with sources of carbohydrates either by eating three distinct meals every several hours or grazing throughout the day. For those who choose not to eat anything between dinner and breakfast the next morning, this provides a window of potentially twelve hours with no carbohydrates entering the bloodstream. As mentioned before, insulin often works over an extended period of time, and may still be helping lower your blood sugar at night when you are sleeping and will cause a low blood sugar at night. You might be wondering how this will lead to high blood sugars in the morning right about now. Our bodies have a unique system of storing some extra glucose in our liver, and these stores are called glycogen. When we eat foods that are turned into glucose as they are digested, a limited amount of this glucose is stored in the liver for emergency purposes in case we need a boost of energy to run away from a bear that is about to eat us. For the average American Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy snack ideas for people with type 2 diabetes Small Snacks If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, youll find many healthy ideas below. Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canadas Food Guide . The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Heres a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate -rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats , barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL ( cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL ( cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 1 single-serve (125 mL) unsweetened applesauce sp Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! Our Best Articles, Delivered Get expert advice on Diabetes from our coaches and trainers The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood Continue reading >>

Bedtime Snack Ideas - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Bedtime Snack Ideas - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Ok.... my glucometer is outdated and I'm waiting for a new one from insurance to come in the mail so the numbers may be a bit off. I was diagnosed 2 weeks ago and all of my after meal numbers have been great so far. But I can't get my fasting number under 90 no matter what I eat. I had no issues with my fasting numbers during my first pregnancy. What are your go-to snack ideas? And how long is it usually between your snack and your fasting test? What i have for bedtime is 1wheat bread with cheese slice and half glass of skim milk. I also tried *** milk with pure protrin powder and my num were fine i think the protein powder is working for me. Also the gap between bed time snack and morning breakfast should be no longer then 8hrs so when you wake up for breakfast before that check your sugar. I do two rice cakes topped with peanut butter and a piece of string cheese and plenty of water. The dr wanted me under 100... which I rarely ever was, and I never was under 90 lol. Nothin I tried worked, I have to take meds... :( I am kinda lucky with fasting as I can eat just about anything and always be under 100 for fasting. My go to snacks are 1 oz mixed nuts, skippy PB Bites, a mini haagen Dazs chocolate ice cream. Also I don't worry about how many hours it's been before testing, although it's always at least 8. I do test immediately upon waking though. I've been doing a Yasso Greek yogurt ice cream bar, a piece of cheese, and a scoop of peanut butter. This keeps me under 95 and usually under 90 but my dr asked for under 95 so it has been working well for now. I go about 6-7 hrs unfortunately I have to get up really early for work and I'm lucky to sleep 6-7 hrs and then I test right when I wake up. Weekends I can get to 8 and weather I test at 6 or 8 the fasting number is stil Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Snacking Options

Diabetes-friendly Snacking Options

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 12 No. 9 P. 12 Grabbing a quick bite between meals isn’t off-limits for people with diabetes. “Snacking can really contribute to a healthy diet. It ensures that our body gets the fuel that it needs regularly throughout the day—and that’s true for everybody, diabetes or not,” says Beverley Manganelli, RD, BS, CDE, manager of community nutrition services at Hunterdon Medical Center in Flemington, N.J. “What’s different for someone with diabetes is, obviously, what kind of medications they’re on and their blood sugar control. Snacking can definitely impact that, so you need to pay a little more attention to the things that you choose. Although there are no ‘never’ foods, you do want to get a nutritious bang for your buck.” Because carbohydrate is the nutrient that impacts blood sugar the most, monitoring intake is crucial. “Generally, snacks can be between 15 and 30 g [of carbohydrate], but that’s based on individual needs and what that patient works out with their registered dietitian,” says Manganelli. Caloric intake needs to be addressed as well, especially since many people with type 2 diabetes need to lose weight. However, a patient already at a good weight who works at an active job may need more carbohydrates. Older patients with long-standing diabetes often struggle with the idea that they can work sugar into their food plan. “They’re used to the old way of thinking,” says Lindsay Fortman, RD, CDE, of Memorial Healthcare’s Diabetes & Outpatient Nutrition Counseling Center in Owosso, Mich. “But with being allowed to eat anything—it’s portion size that matters—we are seeing better compliance.” Time It Right Grazing throughout the day, however, may negatively impact blood sugar. Constantly taking i Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Bedtime Snacks

Type 1 Diabetes And Bedtime Snacks

With type 1 diabetes we never let our guard down- especially in the middle of the night. One of the most vulnerable times people may encounter is during sleep which brings about the importance of a bedtime snack. Safety with type 1 diabetes is always paramount. When we are at rest, our awake clues of hypoglycemia become dampened. Lets look at the importance of a solid bedtime snack with recommendations from Sara Pinson, Registered Dietician (RD). Important food qualities to look for in a bedtime snack with type 1 diabetes According to Sara Pinson, RD there are differences in the food choices we make at bedtime to help stabilize our blood sugars overnight. She suggests combining foods that include both a carbohydrate and a protein to help sustain blood sugars overnight. Sara states: “Carbohydrates that are fiber rich will also keep kids feeling full and decrease the speed at which the sugar travels into the blood stream, helping to combat swings in those in the middle of the night blood sugars.” Top suggestions for a bedtime snack with type 1 diabetes (these are also gluten-free) 1 Cup of homemade trail mix (Kix cereal, rice or corn Chex cereal, unsalted almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pumpkin seeds and a few raisins on top) Cheese (cubed, string) with apple or cucumber slices Boiled egg with a handful of popcorn 1/2 cup of edamame Celery or apple with 1 tbsp of peanut butter or almond butter on top 1/4 cup of hummus and veggies Lowfat or plain greek yogurt 1 whole wheat gluten free waffle with fresh fruit 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese with a tbsp of walnuts and fresh sliced berries 1-2 slices of gluten free deli meat with a handful of grapes or get famcy and make lettuce wraps with sliced bell peppers in between Whole grain gluten free crackers with cream cheese on top Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacks For People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy Snacks For People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Share: Snack is not a “four-letter” word. Snacks are important in the daily life of a person with diabetes, particularly those with type 1 diabetes and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes. If there are more than four or five hours between meals, the person runs the risk of low blood sugar, and getting so hungry that he overeats at the next meal. Between-meal and bedtime snacks are essential to keep glucose tablets, wherever they go, particularly when driving or exercising. The best snacks are healthy, convenient and carbohydrate-controlled. Healthy means higher in fiber, low fat, less salt, and no or very little sugar. Convenient snacks do not have to be refrigerated, like snack bars and packaged snacks. Most important is the amount of carbohydrate the snack offers - a serving, or choice, is about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Your meal plan may designate the amount of carbohydrate for snacks. To slow the rise of blood sugar, and keep you full longer, you can include some healthy protein with your snack. Here are some tips in selecting your snacks: · Do not eat right out of the bag - count out your allowed serving, put the food items on a plate, and enjoy. There are single serving raisins, pretzels and other snack foods to help us with portion control. · Look for fresh snacks in the produce department - baby carrots, fresh fruit. · All crackers, bread and English muffins should be whole grain. · Watch the calories while you control the carbs. A snack should be about 150-200 calories. · Select nutrition bars carefully. Granola type bars are high in sugar and low in protein. Find bars that are more balanced - with 7 or more grams of protein. There are handy nutrition bars designed for diabetes that slow the rise of blood sugar with special formulations. (Extend Bars, G Continue reading >>

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

1 / 7 Midnight Snacking Isn't Off Limits If You Have Diabetes Midnight snacking doesn’t typically have the healthiest connotations. But being hungry late at night doesn’t mean you have to derail your diabetes diet by standing in front of the refrigerator spooning ice cream out of the tub, as delicious as that may sound. In fact, satisfying a late-night craving with a healthy snack may be good for diabetes. That’s because fasting for too long can, in some cases, make the liver overproduce glucose, which can raise blood sugar — an effect that can be harmful for people with type 2 diabetes, says Lori Chong, RDN, CDE, at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. Next time you have a hankering for something salty, savory, or sweet, get your hands on one of these diabetes-friendly snacks to ward off hunger and help you get back to sleep. Continue reading >>

6 Smart Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

6 Smart Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

Many people with diabetes deliberately nosh at night to keep glucose levels from plummeting while they sleep. A snack before bed isn’t a bad impulse, says Fran Cogen, M.D., director of the childhood and adolescent diabetes program at Children’s National Health System. But the wrong kind of snack can actually make things worse. Instead of high-carb fare like chips, “aim for a bedtime snack of protein plus carbohydrate,” she says. Also keep in mind that blood sugar levels are highly individual and will vary based on how active you are each day. So before you hit the kitchen, it’s best to test your glucose level. The Best Bedtime Snacks 10 Goldfish crackers + 1/2 cup skim milk String cheese + whole-grain crackers Apple slices + peanut butter 1 slice whole wheat bread + 2 oz turkey Hummus + raw veggies 1/4 cup cottage cheese + 1/2 cup berries Continue reading >>

Does Everyone With Diabetes Need A Bedtime Snack?

Does Everyone With Diabetes Need A Bedtime Snack?

Are you one of those people who get a craving for ice cream right around 10 pm? Or maybe you like to munch on potato chips when watching late night TV? Snacking before bedtime can be a guilty pleasure, but people with diabetes are often told to include it in their meal plans. Is this something that every person with diabetes really needs? Diabetes Meal Planning has Changed In the past, people who were diagnosed with diabetes were often given vague directions about meal planning, with little attention paid to their personal goals. Most people were told to have 3 meals and 3 snacks per day, without much guidance on exactly what and when to eat. Times have changed, and thankfully so have diabetes meal-planning guidelines. Nowadays, meal plans are much more flexible and individualized. Similarly, the decision to include a bedtime snack in your diet depends on many things – blood sugar levels, weight management goals, and your eating schedule. Blood sugar levels at bedtime are particularly important to look at. A study in the Journal of Diabetes Care recommends having a snack if your blood sugar is less than 126 mg/dl, but to avoid snacking if your blood sugar is higher than 180 mg/dl. Why is Snacking Important for People with Diabetes? Some people with diabetes may develop what’s called nocturnal hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) while they sleep. If your blood sugar at bedtime is low – i.e., less than 126 mg/dl ? then a snack can help to prevent this nighttime dip. But be wise about your snack selection: this isn’t a green light to eat just anything. It’s important to choose a snack that is low in calories, as well as a healthy source of carbohydrate and protein. Best Bedtime Snacks A general rule of thumb is 15-30 grams of carbs and about an ounce (7 grams) of prot Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

How To Snack In The Right Way If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

How To Snack In The Right Way If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If it fits your meal plan, yogurt with fruit can be a good snack.Getty Images If you have type 2 diabetes, you don't need to include snacks in your daily diet, unless you're on a type of medication, such as insulin or sulfonylureas, that can cause hypoglycemia. However, snacksif they are healthy and part of the meal plan developed by your diabetes educator or dietitiancan help prevent blood glucose peaks and valleys, as well as overeating at mealtime. The trick is knowing which foods make a "good" snack, the right portion size, and how often you should eat between meals. Calculate snack carbohydrates and calories A good snack consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on the individual's meal plan and medication), according to Rosalia Doyle, RD, a nutritionist at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. Just like meals, snacks should aim for a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates (read the food label to get all the details). "At our clinic, every type 2 diabetic gets an individual meal plan when they see one of the registered dietitians. And snacking is important for some people because it helps to prevent the blood sugar from fluctuating," says Doyle. Doyle likes to incorporate snacks her clients enjoy, like yogurt with fruit, popcorn without butter, and berries. Despite the nutritional value of such snacks, this eating must also be monitored. Inappropriate snacking can contribute to obesity. One way to avoid harmful snacking is to understand portion sizes for both your snacks and meals, and to stick to the parameters. "Three cups of popcorn is the same serving as one slice of bread, and a great snack," says Doyle. Other snack ideas include high fiber cereal with soy milk, a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes