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Diabetes Bear

The New Jerry The Bear.

The New Jerry The Bear.

Since theyre local to me here in Rhode Island, I drove up to the Jerry the Bear office to meet with my friends Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung, creators of Jerry the Bear. Its awesome to see you guys! Where have you been the last few years? After hugs and hellos, I realized my question was unfair. Because they havent been hiding but instead, the team behind Jerry the Bear has been working tirelessly to change their business in efforts to meet their mission of getting Jerry into the hands of every child diagnosed with type 1 diabetes globally. Thats quite a mission. But if anyone can accomplish this goal, the driven, passionate, creative, and all-heart team behind Jerry can. A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on As a business, we know that Jerry the Bear works , but in order to succeed and survive, we need to make the business work. Weve been working to move our company from a direct to consumer model to a business-to-business model. This means were not selling our bears directly to people but instead have partnered with two different distributors in order to get Jerry into kids hands, said Jerry the Bear co-founder and CEO, Aaron Horowitz. Namely, theyve partnered with Beyond Type 1 to handle domestic and international orders (except Canada) and Diabetes Express for our neighbors to the north. We want to improve life with diabetes for kids by giving them something positive to associate with diabetes, said Hannah Chung, co-founder and CCO. The Sproutel team did a lot of research in developing new Jerry. In addition to marathon sessions with post it notes, building paper prototypes, and body storming, the team went into the field to access kids in their natural play habitats. Hannah told me that she went to playgrounds during the development phase in order to Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear Comes Home

Jerry The Bear Comes Home

Jerry the Bear arrived at our house and within a few hours, Jerry had enjoyed a few slices of pizza (with insulin!) and had a couple of low blood sugar events, which Henry treated with the 15-15 rule he learned from Jerry: eat 15 carbs and wait 15 minutes to check blood sugar. Each morning since Jerrys arrival, Henry has set his alarm for 7:30 a.m. and the first thing he does is check Jerrys blood sugar. Jerry is a stuffed teddy bear that has Type 1 diabetes. He comes with a free app, that much like a QR code, reads patches on his body, where insulin would be injected. You can interact with Jerry through the app, count carbs, calculate insulin doses, and listen to Jerrys diaries where he tells stories of going to school, as well as what its like to live with Type 1. As a parent of a young child with Type 1, my job is multi-faceted. Right now, Im my sons pancreas, and Ive been his pancreas for over half his life. Every since he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 3, I decide how much insulin to dose for the food he eats, give him rescue carbs when his blood sugar goes too low, and change his insulin pump site every few days. My alarm is set for 2 a.m. and 5 a.m. so that I can monitor his blood sugar through the night. However, it wont always be my job to be Henrys pancreas. Ill have to teach Henry to be his own pancreas. After all, its Henrys diabetes, not mine. Parents are always teaching their children skills: how to tie shoes, how to cook, to drive a car, to manage money. So in my more rational moments, I think of teaching Henry to manage his diabetes as just one more of the many things a parent teaches a child. The problem is that these rational moments are punctured with panic that every parent of a Type 1 child knows. Having the flu could mean DKA and Continue reading >>

Camping In Bear Country With Type 1 Diabetes

Camping In Bear Country With Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Camping in Bear Country With Type 1 Diabetes Last summer, we went camping in one of our favorite vacation spots: Yosemite National Park. We had done a fair amount of camping since Kaitlyn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, so we were feeling like we had the whole camping with diabetes thing down pretty well. However, this was our first time in bear country since her diagnosis. For those who havent been camping in bear country before, rule number one is to always store your food in bear boxes. Amazingly, a bear can smell even a sealed can of food through a locked car and will tear a door off to get it! It had been a particularly big year for bear encounters in Yosemite, and bears had actually come through our campsite twice while we were there. So, we were VERY careful about keeping all of our food, toiletries, and even our baby wipes in the bear box. Most of the time, using the bear box wasnt a huge inconvenience. We would get our food out during meal times and then lock it back up when we were done. But the nighttime routine was another story The first night we were there, I checked Kaitlyns blood sugar holding a flashlight in my mouth. I finally got a reading and it was low! Argh! I had to find my shoes, zip open the tent, and get her juice out of the bear box. To make matters worse, I woke up half the camp with the insanely loud latch on the bear box. I went back to the tent, gave Kaitlyn the juice, went all the way over to the bear-proof trash cans to throw away the almost empty juice box, and then made my way back to the tent. The next morning my sister (who was camping with her family next to us), told us that she was convinced there was a bear trying to break into our bear box. We both had a pretty good laugh when I tol Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear

Jerry The Bear

Jerry is currently available in the US through Beyond Type 1 Jerry is currently available in Canada through Diabetes Express By taking care of Jerry's diabetes, children gain hands-on practice with counting carbs, monitoring Jerry's blood sugar, and dosing Jerry with insulin. Kids care for Jerry using the virtual diabetes tools and the digital pantry in our app! Check Jerry's blood sugar by lancing Jerry's finger and adding a test strip to the glucometer! When Jerry's blood sugar goes high or low, Jerry speaks symptoms, encouraging kids to recognize how they feel. Use Jerry's insulin pen or pump to dose insulin. Learn about injection site rotation by using the injection sites on Jerry's arms, legs, belly, and butt. Feed Jerry a healthy diet or give him junk food! Either way, kids learn about the impact that carbs have on blood sugar, and learn carb counts for basic foods in Jerry's virtual kitchen. Follow along with Jerry's journey to train for the All Stars Games! All 21 interactive story books are paired with care tasks to reinforce important diabetes lessons. Our curriculum is co-designed with doctors, educators, and families to create educational content that kids love. Check Jerry's blood sugar by following the steps of lancing Jerry's finger and adding a test strip to the glucometer! When Jerry's blood sugar goes high or low, Jerry speaks symptoms, encouraging kids to recognize how they feel. Use Jerry's insulin pen or pump to dose insulin. Learn about injection site rotation by using the injection sites on Jerry's arms, legs, belly, and butt. Feed Jerry a healthy diet or give him junk food! Either way, kids learn about the impact that carbs have on blood sugar, and learn carb counts for basic foods in Jerry's virtual kitchen. Follow along with Jerry's journey to Continue reading >>

Build-a-bear Diabetes Kit (hooray!)

Build-a-bear Diabetes Kit (hooray!)

Summary: Build-A-Bear has added a Diabetes Kit to their accessory line that includes an insulin pump, glucose meter, and lancing device. It retails for $10 and is available online and in select stores. I have a few friends who have many, many stuffed animals from Build-A-Bear and their collections seem to be constantly growing. Qs collection would grow exponentially if we had a BAB store in our town, but she only gets to shop for them in person when we travel. I was on Facebook recently and one of my friends (Hi, Stacey!) posted a picture of her newest bear. And it was wearing an insulin pump! A bunch of us T1Ds and parents of T1D kiddos instantly commented wanting to know where we, too, could get an insulin pump for our bears. I immediately reached out to Build-A-Bear wanting to know more. They were kind enough to send us the Diabetes Kit so we could see it in person and share it with you. Im awaiting answers to some questions I have about the how and why BAB decided to add it to their accessory line. But I really wanted to share this with you as soon as possible in case you are looking for one more special holiday gift for your child with diabetes. The Diabetes Kit is available online and in select stores (you can do a search on the product page for stores near you) and sells for $10. It includes an insulin pump on a waistband, a glucose meter, and a lancing device. Q thinks its so cute, especially the heart on the meter, and immediately her bear was diagnosed with diabetes. (And you are never too old to play with bears. Am I right?) If you have a Lenny the Lion , which is made by Build-A-Bear and is available to Medtronic insulin pump users, this would be an awesome accessory. But how cool is it that you can now accessorize any of the many BAB animals with his or he Continue reading >>

How A Startup Is Educating Kids With Diabetes With A Teddy Bear

How A Startup Is Educating Kids With Diabetes With A Teddy Bear

How a startup is educating kids with diabetes with a teddy bear How a startup is educating kids with diabetes with a teddy bear Jerry the Bear comes with a backpack, food cards, an insulin pen, interactive storybooks, injection sites, and tickle spots. Beyond the day-to-day inconveniences and physical struggles of a diabetes diagnosis, children with the disease often face the social stigma and anxiety of being different from their peers. In response, a startup company came up with the idea of using a stuffed teddy bear as a companion and interactive health education tool for children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Through the use of animated books and sensors installed using an Android tablet in Sproutel's Jerry the Bear, children can learn more about their condition by acting as caregivers themselves, feeding food to the bear, administering insulin, and monitoring his blood glucose levels. According to the American Diabetes Association , about 208,000 Americans younger than 20 years old have been diagnosed with diabetes. Toy companies such as American Girl and Barbie have responded to the epidemic by creating educational products such as diabetes care kits and pump cases for their dolls. See also: Federal agencies and ad groups join forces for prediabetes campaign Speaking at Digitas Health LifeBrands' m.2016 mobile innovation thought leadership platform in New York last week, Sproutel co-founder and CEO Aaron Horowitz said Jerry the Bear is the product of one part passion, one part problem. Diagnosed with human growth hormone deficiency when he was 12 years old, Horowitz experienced firsthand how it felt to self-administer injections every day for five years. It gave me a lot of understanding going through the slew of doctors and healthcare providers at a young age Continue reading >>

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do Bears can eat like pigs, hibernate for months and still be healthy. This seems so unfair. Tim Shobe/iStockphoto hide caption Bears can eat like pigs, hibernate for months and still be healthy. This seems so unfair. Sometimes nature comes up with elegant solutions to difficult problems, like how to gain weight and not get diabetes. Take, for instance, the grizzly bear. How does this 750-pound mammal survive long, lean winters? Well, it just gets really fat beforehand and then sleeps the hungry season away. Grizzly bears can easily double their body fat in the months leading up to hibernation. For us humans, this kind of weight gain could result in some pretty serious health consequences one of the most common being Type 2 diabetes. But grizzly bears are adept at staying healthy despite their dramatic fluctuations in weight, reports a study published Tuesday in Cell Metabolism. According to the report, the grizzly's ability to pack on the pounds and then use that energy efficiently during hibernation might have to do with the surprising way that its body responds to the hormone insulin. If Polar Bears Can Eat A Ton Of Fat And Be Healthy, Why Can't We? "The results were so different from what we see in humans and rodents that we were all very skeptical at first," says Kevin Corbit, a senior scientist at Amgen Inc. , a biotechnology firm in Thousand Oaks, Calif., who led the research team. "This was a complete surprise," he says. Amgen is interested in the potential this research has to help treat obesity and diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, and it instructs fat, liver and muscle tissue to suck up blood sugar and convert it into fat. In humans, weight gai Continue reading >>

How Motivating Is A Diabetes Teddy Bear? | Ask D'mine

How Motivating Is A Diabetes Teddy Bear? | Ask D'mine

Ask D'Mine: Just the (Diabetes Bear) Facts Written by Wil Dubois on January 20, 2018 Happy Saturday! Welcome to Ask D'Mine, our weekly advice column hosted by veteran type 1 and diabetes author W il Dubois in New Mexico, who also has experience as a clinical diabetes specialist. This week, Wil ponders the mystery of "disappearing diabetes" -- or when it seems like blood sugar control has magically gone on auto-pilot(?) Here's Wil's take on that. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Elizabeth, grandma of a type 1 from Idaho, writes: Im worried about my little grandson. When he was diagnosed two or three years ago he was given a Rufus Teddy Bear that, like him, had diabetes. The bear has been a constant companion until just recently. When I asked him where Rufus was, he told me that Rufus was cured and didnt have diabetes anymore. Im worried that because hes decided his bear is cured that he might decide to stop taking his insulin shots, which he learned to do at a very early age. What do you think? Am I worried for nothing, or is there a risk here? [email protected] DMine answers: I love Rufus ! For any of you who havent had the pleasure of meeting him, Rufus is a Teddy Bear who has diabetes. He comes complete with a medic alert bracelet and with little patches showing where he needs his shots and where he needs his paw pricked for his blood sugar tests. His mission (and the mission of his various sponsors through the JDRF over the years) is to make the childhood diagnosis experience less lonely. JDRF tells me that 163,000 Rufus bears have been given to newly diagnosed children as part of their Bags of Hope kits since Carol Cramer sewed the first one for her own child with diabetes in 1996 (and then went on to create the next 1,300 bears at her own exp Continue reading >>

Teddy Bear With Diabetes Helps Children Through Diagnosis And Beyond

Teddy Bear With Diabetes Helps Children Through Diagnosis And Beyond

Teddy Bear with Diabetes Helps Children Through Diagnosis and Beyond Rufus, the teddy bear with diabetes, is full of love, but was born out of anger. Carol Cramer, the Lake Zurich, Illinois, mother who sewed the first Rufus bear, was inspired by the exasperation that followed her son Brians diagnosis with diabetes at age 3. I was angry because my son had to take on such a strong sense of bravery. He had to be even more brave than me, recalls Carol. Children should not have to endure taking on the role of hero. It just hurt me so much. Carol wanted to help her son with his feelings upon diagnosis, so she bought him a teddy bear and sewed patches on all of the bears injection sites and finger tips, where he would have to poke himself. Brian named the bear Rufus, and they began to face the world of diabetes together. Rufus helped Brian to not feel alone or different. Everyone loves a teddy bear, just for being a teddy bear, just as people love children just for being children, says Carol. Rufus helped to let Brian know that a child with diabetes is no more or less lovable a child. There are no labels. You are who you are because thats who you were created to be. Because Rufus helped Brian feel loved, Carol thought that other children, upon first being diagnosed, would also love a teddy bear with diabetes. When your child is first diagnosed, you and the child have to take in very scary terms-blindness, shots, pokes, you cant eat this-and its hard to tell with young children what theyre thinking. Carol approached the hospital where Brian was educated and, borrowing against her own life insurance policy, bought over 1300 bears, sewed the patches on all of them, and donated them to the hospital. But Carol knew she could not afford many more, and needed some help. She called t Continue reading >>

Dr. Roboto? Interactive Teddy Bear Helps Kids Manage Diabetes

Dr. Roboto? Interactive Teddy Bear Helps Kids Manage Diabetes

Dr. Roboto? Interactive Teddy Bear Helps Kids Manage Diabetes The World at Work is powered by GE . This new series highlights the people, projects and startups that are driving innovation and making the world a better place. Big Idea: Jerry the Bear is a robotic teddy bear that "has" diabetes. Children are able to take care of Jerry by checking his blood glucose levels, giving him "insulin shots" and "feeding" him a variety of foods. Why It's Working: Targeted specifically to children living with type 1 diabetes, Jerry helps sick kids not only learn about the procedures that are performed on them daily but also empowers them to understand the importance of symptom-checking and self-care. People with type 1 diabetes, a lifelong genetic condition that prevents the accurate breakdown of glucose in the blood, rely on a steady amount of insulin to be delivered to their bodies every day. Since young children cannot manage an insulin pump, test their own glucose or deliver their own injections, parents with diabetic children must administer at least 3 finger-sticking blood glucose checks and frequent insulin injections every day to ensure diabetes is managed. For a five-year-old child, that's a lot of boo-boos in the name of love. Enter Jerry the Bear, a fully interactive robotic teddy bear with type 1 diabetes and the brainchild of Northwestern students and Design for America fellows Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung. Horowitz, now CEO for the duo's company Sproutel , explains that Jerry the Bear was inspired by the teddy bears children often get after their diabetes diagnosis. "They respond really well to these inanimate objects that they ascribe all sort of feelings to," Horowitz explains. "We just saw there was a great potential to use this thing they're so attached to and Continue reading >>

Bears And Diabetes | Oupblog

Bears And Diabetes | Oupblog

Eric Chivian , MD, is the founder and Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School. In 1980, he co-founded, with three other Harvard faculty members, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War , which won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Aaron Bernstein , MD has been affiliated with the Center for Health and the Global Environment since 2001 and is currently a resident in the Boston Combined Residency in Pediatrics . Together they wrote Sustaining Life: How Human Health Depends on Biodiversity which presents a comprehensive review of how human medicines, biomedical research, the emergence and spread of infectious diseases, and the production of food all depend on biodiversity. Chivian was recently interview on Canadas The Hour, you can watch him here . In the excerpt below from the book we learn more about the importance of Polar Bears. Nine species of bears are listed on the IUCNs 206 Red List of Threatened Animal Species, including the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus), the Giant Panda (Alluropoda melanoleuca) and the Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus). In 2005, the Polar Bear Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission reviewed the status of the Polar Bear and decided to list it as a Vulnerable species, increasing its degree of threat from Lower Risk, given the projected loss of habitat resulting from global climate change. And in 2006, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began a review to consider whether Polar Bears should also be protected under the Endangered Species Act, a decision that is expected in early 2008. Influencing this decision will be a series of studies released in September 2007 by the U.S. Geological Survey predicting that two-thirds of the worlds Polar Bears will be lost by 2050 beca Continue reading >>

Care For The Bear: A Novel Approach To Diabetes Education

Care For The Bear: A Novel Approach To Diabetes Education

Care for the Bear: A Novel Approach to Diabetes Education The pace of innovation in medicine and medical practices is relentless. The technology moves so quickly that it is often difficult for caregivers to explain the treatments behind the path to wellness. Hannah Chung, Aaron Horowitz and the Sproutel team have proven that healthcare innovation goes well beyond the parameters of surgical centers, laboratories and prescription drugs; innovation can also take the shape of a huggable stuffed animalJerry the Bear. Developed to teach children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes how to manage the disease, Jerry has had a positive impact on the hearts and minds of the smallest of patients. Through Jerry, Chung and Horowitz are bridging the communication gap between medical practitioners and the most impressionable of patients, giving children with a serious health issue a greater understanding of their condition and the methods necessary to control or treat it. Jerry the Bear started out as a sketch on a Post-it Note, but has evolved into a cuddly teddy bear that educates children and promotes empathy and understanding, ultimately empowering them to take an active role in their diabetes care. Children can feed Jerry one of 10 food cards, and the carbohydrate grams passed over his mouth are calculated on a touch screen on Jerrys stomach to teach children correct food choices. Children can also squeeze one of Jerrys fingers to measure blood-sugar levels, which are also indicated on the touch screen. When the sugar levels get out of range, the insulin pen can be touched to one of the injection sites on the bears body to adjust the blood-sugar level. This allows the patient to become the care provider and teaches how eating healthy foods can help manage the disease. The idea f Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear For Kids With Type 1 Diabetes: New & Improved!

Jerry The Bear For Kids With Type 1 Diabetes: New & Improved!

Jerry the Bear for Kids with Type 1 Diabetes: New & Improved! Jerry the Bear is a pretty special fella. He isnt just soft and cuddly. He isnt just smiley and cute. This bearknows what its like to wear an insulin pump and receive insulin injections because Jerry the Bear is a bear with type 1 diabetes . And hes here to help your kiddos with type 1 diabetes feel a little less alone, and a little less like the only one around who has to deal with diabetes every day. Founded by Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung , Jerry the Bear is designed to help your child learn about diabetes while also feeling like theyre not alone. Through playing games, Jerry the Bear teaches kids with diabetes about all aspects of the disease, such as: but with his new and improved features, he does even more to help your child with type 1 learn about managing their blood sugar.We spoke with Jerrys creators about his latest features in this interview: For those who dont already know the original Jerry the Bear, could you give a simpleexplanation of what hes all about Jerry the Bear is a best friend for kids with type 1 diabetes. By taking care of Jerrys diabetes,children gain hands-on practice with counting carbs, monitoring Jerrys blood sugar, and dosingJerry with insulin. Kids can also follow along Jerrys journey of training for the All Stars Game through 21 animated storybooks. Who created Jerry the Bear? How did the idea for him come about? Jerry the Bear is created by Sproutel. Were a research, design, and development company thatmakes interactive educational companions for kids health. Sproutel has been recognized byPresident Obama and the White House and little Jerry has even been programmed to wishPresident Obama a happy birthday! The insight to create Jerry came from observing children with t Continue reading >>

Teddy Bear Could Help Kids Cope With Diabetes

Teddy Bear Could Help Kids Cope With Diabetes

Jerry the Bear aims to help children with type 1 diabetes. NEW YORK For young children with type I diabetes, days are filled with constant monitoring, finger pricking and insulin injections. But one inventor is aiming to bring these children a bit of comfort during these activities, as well as to teach them the importance of staying healthy he created a teddy called Jerry the Bear, who also has diabetes. Aaron Horowitz, CEO of tech startup Sproutel, grew up with a condition called human growth hormone deficiency, which also required frequent injections to treat. After visiting children with type I diabetes in hospitals, Horowitz said he realized that their feelings of loneliness mirrored his own. Many of the children had stuffed animals, and projected their medical condition onto their inanimate friends, Horowitz said. In people with Type I diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce the hormone insulin. The children would prick their companions' fingers to test their blood sugar, and cut syringes out of paper to give them insulin injections. [ Top 10 Stigmatized Health Disorders ] Horowitz set out to create an educational toy, and wound up with Jerry the Bear. This teddy bear's sensors connect to a central Android system, which runs a unique operating system. Jerry comes with a handful of interactive storybooks and games. Children can feed Jerry, regulate his insulin with injections and prick his fingers to monitor his blood sugar. A large, colorful screen in the center of Jerry's chest provides not only a medical readout , but a space for children to play games. Horowitz made Jerry's condition into a game. Children must monitor Jerry's health very closely, because as they will learn through storybook sequences and touchpad games the bear is training for the Olympics, and w Continue reading >>

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

When your child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D), it can be an overwhelming time. As you navigate this challenging period of adjustment to life with T1D, you can find helpful information and support through the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF Bag of Hope is filled with useful resources for both the child who has been diagnosed with T1D and his or her caregivers. Along with educational materials, we’ve included a special friend — Rufus, the Bear with Diabetes® — to show your child he or she is not alone while learning to take shots and test blood sugar. Resources in your JDRF Bag of Hope include (but are not limited to): Rufus the Bear with Diabetes “Rufus Comes Home” book “Pink Panther: A First Book for Understanding Diabetes” JDRF materials with educational video links “CalorieKing” book ACCU-CHEK® Aviva Connect blood glucose meter Information about Novo Nordisk/JDRF educational book series Novo Nordisk adjustable measuring scoop Informational postcard about the support Lilly Diabetes offers families with a bookmark Lilly Diabetes literature on severe hypoglycemia management Discount coupon for a stylish medical ID bracelet by Hope Paige Designs for your child Babysitter Guide provided by Omnipod® Glucose tabs in an Omnipod® tin “My Trip to Quest Diagnostics” coloring and activity book The JDRF Bag of Hope Program is made possible by generous funding provided by Co-Presenting Sponsors: Roche and Quest Diagnostics, and Supporting Sponsors: Insulet, Lilly Diabetes, Novo Nordisk and Hope Paige Designs. Only available for children (16 and under) who reside in the United States. Live outside the US? Was this helpful? Continue reading >>

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